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Governor unsure if he'll veto law aimed at limiting his powers

1 month 1 week 2 days ago Thursday, October 22 2020 Oct 22, 2020 October 22, 2020 3:00 AM October 22, 2020 in News
Source: Associated Press

BATON ROUGE — After Republican Louisiana lawmakers voted Tuesday to give themselves more authority to curb Gov. John Bel Edwards’ coronavirus restrictions and emergency powers, the Governor reportedly said he's unsure if he'll veto their bill, according to reporter Sam Karlin.

The Associated Press reports that on Tuesday night, the Senate backed Covington Republican Rep. Mark Wright's bill in a 23-13 vote, followed by House backing in a 54-30 vote.

The votes largely were along party lines, with most Republicans in favor and Democrats opposed.

“It’s no longer a situation where you have to have the governor running the entire emergency response,” House Republican leader Blake Miguez said. “This is to allow the Legislature to get involved in the process.”

The measure heads next to the governor’s desk, where Edwards could choose to veto it. He’s repeatedly said he doesn’t support any attempts to lessen his emergency authority.

The House doesn’t have enough Republican members to override a gubernatorial veto. That raises questions about whether lawmakers will return home without a permanent law change to the governor’s emergency powers and legislative oversight — the major disagreement between GOP lawmakers and the Democratic governor that prompted the special session.

Republicans say Edwards’ statewide mask mandate, business restrictions and crowd size limits at football games and other events are too harsh seven months after the coronavirus outbreak began in Louisiana.

Edwards has loosened his restrictions several times, noting that his rules are in line with guidance from the White House’s coronavirus task force and are less strict than what exists in many other states.

The process outlined in Wright’s bill would come into play when a governor renews a state of disaster or emergency declaration after the first 30 days of the proclamation. Edwards has repeatedly renewed — and tweaked — his public health emergency declaration and restrictions for months, since first issuing it in March.

Under the bill, if one of the top two elected leaders of both the House and Senate agree that provisions of a governor’s renewed order exceed his authority or “are not narrowly tailored to address the disaster,” they could ask lawmakers to vote by mailed ballot on whether to revoke individual sections of that order. That means they could pick and choose which coronavirus restrictions enacted by Edwards they want to end.

Approval of Wright’s legislation in the House came with some confusion about what the Senate’s rewrite of the bill does. Still, GOP leaders rushed the compromise agreement to final passage, even though some Republicans in the House asked for a vote delay. Wright wasn’t in the House chamber for the vote; Miguez handled the bill.

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