WBRZ https://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Weather news Weather news en-us Copyright 2024, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Mon, 22 Apr 2024 HH:04:ss GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ https://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 NEW: officials determine April 10 tornado in West Feliciana Parish was on ground for 33 miles https://www.wbrz.com/news/new-officials-determine-april-10-tornado-in-west-feliciana-parish-was-on-ground-for-33-miles/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/new-officials-determine-april-10-tornado-in-west-feliciana-parish-was-on-ground-for-33-miles/ Weather news Fri, 19 Apr 2024 6:51:50 PM The Storm Station Meteorologists NEW: officials determine April 10 tornado in West Feliciana Parish was on ground for 33 miles

Ongoing storm surveys have found that a strong, long tracking tornado tore across portions of Pointe Coupee and West Feliciana Parishes during severe weather on April 10. This single tornado was previously believed to be two separate tornadoes. Additionally, a second tornado was identified just northwest of the new, long tracking tornado. 

Officials from the National Weather Service (NWS) used recent satellite data to find signs of additional tornadoes. Not only were several previously undetected tornadoes identified in St. Tammany Parish and Hancock County, but one of the West Feliciana Parish tornadoes was discovered to be on the ground continuously for 33 miles with a maximum width peaking near 1 mile near Spillman, LA. This tornado ranks as the second longest continuously on the ground in the Storm Station's 13 Parish, 2 County forecast area (since 1950). 

This EF-1 tornado with maximum winds of 110mph formed south of Morganza, LA within a powerful line of thunderstorms and quickly moved northeast over mainly rural lands before causing more substantial tree damage as it crossed Morganza Highway. The tree damage became increasingly more widespread and intense as the tornado crossed Levee Road and the Mississippi River. High resolution satellite imagery identified a focused swath of tree damage roughly 400 yards in width that continued northeast through the Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge up through US Highway 61. Tree damage was observed on Highway 61 with another large swath of tree damage further northeast on Bains Road. Due to the heavily wooded and rural areas, ground surveys were impeded in identifying parts of this track as it continued northeast. The tornado quickly grew in size thereafter and the most significant damage began after the tornado crossed Polk Brannon Road. Ground survey was able to access areas along Spillman and Jones Vaughn Creek Road where numerous trees were snapped, large hardwood trees were uprooted, and several wooden electrical transmission poles were snapped. The peak width of the damage path was measured in this vicinity with widespread damage evident along a mile wide swath. Ground surveys were impeded in Spillman due to widespread tree damage from this tornado, but the damage path and track remained wide and significant as it tracked northeast along Highway 421. High resolution satellite analysis was used to provide the end point for this tornado in which the tornado finally lifted after crossing into rural parts of Wilkinson County in Mississippi.

Further adjustments to peak intensity are possible and another damage survey team from the National Weather Service is planning to revisit the area on Monday. This will assist in finalizing the peak intensity and an increase to an EF-2 rating tornado in West Feliciana Parish is likely.

The second EF-1 tornado with maximum winds of 100mph was confirmed via radar imagery and ground survey. The starting point of this tornado was along the bend of Bayou Sara. The tornado then quickly tracked northeast into Bains where it crossed US Highway 61 causing primarily tree damage near an elementary school. Additional damage was not accessible due to Marydale Road being closed, but high resolution satellite imagery did identify a localized swath of tree damage near Alexander Creek tracking just west of the larger tornado that occurred in this area.

The Storm Station is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Officials: analysis may confirm more tornadoes occurred in West Feliciana on April 10th https://www.wbrz.com/news/officials-analysis-may-confirm-more-tornadoes-occurred-in-west-feliciana-on-april-10th/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/officials-analysis-may-confirm-more-tornadoes-occurred-in-west-feliciana-on-april-10th/ Weather news Thu, 18 Apr 2024 4:58:36 PM Meteorologist Balin Rogers Officials: analysis may confirm more tornadoes occurred in West Feliciana on April 10th

A week after the widespread severe weather moved through southeast Louisiana, officials from the National Weather Service have been looking at recent satellite data to find signs of any additional tornadoes. So far, they have identified several more tornadoes, mainly around the Slidell area. These newly discovered tornadoes have been given preliminary EF-0 and EF-1 ratings.

Further back to the west, further investigations are ongoing in West Feliciana parish. There have been two confirmed tornadoes in that area, but there is a possibility more will be found. Similar to Slidell, satellite data is being utilized to find potential damage paths. This technique is mainly used to find evidence of tornadoes in more rural areas. 

If you know of damage from this event, submit pictures to help the ongoing surveys. Email weather@wbrz.com with those photos and a specific location.

The Storm Station is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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National Weather Service confirms second tornado from Wednesday morning storms https://www.wbrz.com/news/national-weather-service-confirms-second-tornado-from-wednesday-morning-storms/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/national-weather-service-confirms-second-tornado-from-wednesday-morning-storms/ Weather news Wed, 10 Apr 2024 2:08:09 PM The Storm Station Meteorologists National Weather Service confirms second tornado from Wednesday morning storms

POINTE COUPEE PARISH - A National Weather Service (NWS) Survey team determined a EF1 tornado, estimated with peak winds of around 100mph caused damage across southern portions of Morganza. This tornado began across rural areas south of Morganza Highway 1, moving northeast causing damage to homes and trees at the intersection of Deaton Lane and Morganza Highway 1. In all, the tornado was on the ground for 3.26 miles with a maximum path width of 400 yards. 

Tree damage was mostly branches and snapped tree trunks. Damage to homes included mainly caused my falling trees, one on a car port and another tree fallen on a car. The tornado continued northeast across Labarre crossing Levee Road and pointe Coupee Road, with noticeable hardwood tree damage as the tornado crossed the Mississippi River into the Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge.


NWS Survey Team also determined that an EF-1 tornado, estimated peak with winds around 110 mph began crossing Highway 61 north of St. Francisville and in the area of Bains. The tornado caused mainly tree damage included snapped branches and trunks, with some powerline damage along Bains Road, north to Sage Hill Road. Many rural roads had trees covering them as the tornado continued northeast into rural areas east of highway 61, with scattered areas of powerline damage.

The tornado was embedded within a much larger line of thunderstorms which produced a more widespread swath of straight-line winds. That, in addition to the tornado, caused extensive damage in the region.

A TORNADO WARNING was issued for northern Pointe Coupee, West Feliciana, and West Baton Rouge parishes was issued at 8:06 a.m. Wednesday. The storm was moving incredibly fast, to the east at 75 mph when the warning was issued.

The Storm Station is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Solar Eclipse 2024: What to know about the spectacle https://www.wbrz.com/news/solar-eclipse-2024-what-to-know-about-the-spectacle/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/solar-eclipse-2024-what-to-know-about-the-spectacle/ Weather news Sun, 7 Apr 2024 10:12:52 PM Meteorologist Malcolm Byron Solar Eclipse 2024: What to know about the spectacle

Typically one has to wait until dark to see features of interest in the night sky, but soon the sun will steal the show in the middle of the day. Monday, April 8, 2024, the last total solar eclipse for decades will pass through the Lower 48.

Watch live newscasts here.

"A solar eclipse happens when the moon's orbit lines up between the sun and Earth to cause its shadow to fall on the Earth," Amy Northrop at the Highland Road Park Observatory said.

Although the moon is about 400 times smaller than the sun, it is about 400 times closer to the Earth. The moon and sun have the same apparent size in the sky as a result. This is how the moon appears to cover the sun during an eclipse, despite being smaller.

The path of totality passes through locations like Dallas, Texarkana, and Indianapolis this time. It's a narrow path, spanning a little over 100 miles. The moon's shadow will fly along this path at around 1,500 mph.

Baton Rouge will not be within said path on April 8, but we will still be close enough to experience a partial solar eclipse. That's exactly what it sounds like: where the moon only partially covers the sun. Eighty-six percent of the sun will be eclipsed at 1:49 p.m. Monday afternoon in the capital city. The partial eclipse begins at 12:28 p.m. and ends at 3:08 p.m.. 

As this happens, skies become darker.

"It will get darker than it did in both the October annular eclipse that was partial for us and the August eclipse of 2017...because we have better coverage this time," Northrop said.

And those lucky enough to see cloud breaks might notice crescent-shaped shadows, especially around trees.

A total solar eclipse is a much different experience, where the moon covers the sun entirely. That point is referred to as totality. The sun's corona becomes visible during this time, as evidenced by streams of white light surrounding the sun.

As totality comes to an end, beads of light shining through the rugged lunar surface appear - known as Bailey's beads.

That will soon turn into a bright flash of light known as the diamond ring. These are signs that totality is ending.

"Eclipses happen with great regularity. Unfortunately for solar eclipses, you have to be in the lucky path of the shadow in order to make it work," Northrop said.

On average, a total solar eclipse is visible somewhere on the Earth every 18 months. But for one spot, that changes to 375 years.

The next total solar eclipse to occur in the capital area doesn't come until May 11, 2078, but if you're willing to travel, you'll have another opportunity to see a total solar eclipse in the United States in the 2040s.


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The first 2024 Hurricane Season Outlook is in, and it's a big one https://www.wbrz.com/news/the-first-2024-hurricane-season-outlook-is-in-and-it-s-a-big-one/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/the-first-2024-hurricane-season-outlook-is-in-and-it-s-a-big-one/ Weather news Thu, 4 Apr 2024 5:56:04 PM Chief Meteorologist Dr. Josh Eachus The first 2024 Hurricane Season Outlook is in, and it's a big one

The first outlook for the 2024 hurricane season has been posted. Colorado State University has issued its most aggressive pre-season forecast ever, calling for well above average activity. The outlook is for 23 named storms, 11 hurricanes and 5 major hurricanes.

Sea Surface Temperatures as comapared to 30-year average (April 4, 2024)

Dr. Philip Klotzbach and the research team cited several reasons for the forecast of an active season such as well above average sea surface temperatures. Additionally, the Climate Prediction Center assigns a high likelihood that a La Niña pattern will develop this summer.

As defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), El Niño and La Niña are the warm and cool phases of a recurring climate pattern across the tropical Pacific—the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, or “ENSO” for short. Keep in mind that El Niño and La Niña do not “cause” any one specific weather event; rather the two phases of ENSO influence change in global climate patterns that then increase the likelihood of specific weather events. Once again, ENSO is not “to blame” for any one storm system, temperature anomaly or hurricane.

La Niña typically increases the amount of storm activity in the Atlantic basin because it decreases the amount of vertical wind shear. Vertical wind shear references strong winds in the upper levels of the atmosphere that typically work to prevent circulations like tropical systems from becoming fully formed.

The forecast is based on an extended-range early April statistical prediction scheme that was developed using over three decades of past data. These seasonal forecasts were originally developed by the late Dr. William Gray, who was lead author on these predictions for over 20 years and continued as a co-author until his death in 2018. You can review the entire prediction, the scientific explanation and the reason such a forecast is made, RIGHT HERE. Seasonal updates are issued in June, July and August.

Pre-Season Forecasts from NOAA and CSU since 2002 as compared to actual activity observed in Atlantic Basin

Since 2002, these pre-season predictions have shown modest accuracy. The Colorado State University research team outlooks fall within a reasonable margin of error (3 for named storms, 2 for hurricanes, 1 for majors) about 60% of the time. The NOAA outlooks have been only slightly better than a coin flip.

The researchers at Colorado State University and the Storm Station remind that “it only takes one hurricane making landfall to make it an active season for you,” so prepare accordingly. There have been seasons with a lot of storms but few impacts to land and seasons with few storms but a lot of impacts to land. For more on the season ahead and preparedness, visit wbrz.com/weather and click on the hurricane center.


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WATCH: A bright streak of light signaled the return of astronauts to Earth https://www.wbrz.com/news/watch-a-bright-streak-of-light-signaled-the-return-of-astronauts-to-earth/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/watch-a-bright-streak-of-light-signaled-the-return-of-astronauts-to-earth/ Weather news Tue, 12 Mar 2024 1:51:27 PM Meteorologist Malcolm Byron WATCH: A bright streak of light signaled the return of astronauts to Earth

If you were out and about early on Tuesday morning, you may have noticed a bright flash of light across the night sky. Several Storm Station sent in their photos of the spectacle.

It was not a shooting star. Rather, the fiery streak of light was a spacecraft carrying four astronauts who spent more than six months aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The SpaceX Dragon Endurance splashed down at 4:47 a.m. CDT off the coast of Pensacola, Florida.

The spacecraft encountered intense air resistance upon reentering Earth’s atmosphere, which allowed the vessel to heat up rapidly. This in turn led to a bright fireball flying through the sky. Skywatchers across the country had the chance to witness the reentry.

While in the upper atmosphere, the astronauts were traveling faster than the speed of sound. This produced a sonic boom over some parts of the country. A lot of speed was lost in the reentry process. The Dragon spacecraft had to decelerate from over 17,000 mph to nearly 350 mph four minutes prior to splashdown. A series of parachute deployments decelerated the spacecraft further until reaching the ground.

The return to Earth marks the end of NASA’s SpaceX Crew-7 mission. The mission lifted off in late August of 2023 on a Falcon 9 rocket from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Crew-7 members contributed to a variety of science and maintenance activities while on the ISS.

The return of the Crew-7 follows shortly after NASA’s SpaceX Crew-8 launch. The crew members left Earth on March 3, 2024 and docked to the ISS on March 5, marking the beginning of another expedition. Crew-8 is scheduled to return to Earth in Fall 2024.

When you see weather (or space) happening, share it with us! Email photos to weather@wbrz.com or submit them via the Storm Station Weather App.

 


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Severe Weather Awareness Week: Staying Informed https://www.wbrz.com/news/severe-weather-awareness-week-staying-informed/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/severe-weather-awareness-week-staying-informed/ Weather news Fri, 8 Mar 2024 6:57:53 AM Storm Station Team Severe Weather Awareness Week: Staying Informed

Staying safe during severe weather starts with being able to get important weather alerts when they are issued! We suggest having multiple ways to receive those alerts. Some ways to receive alerts include downloading the Storm Station app, watching the Storm Station team on WRBZ or having a NOAA weather radio. Making sure you have access to important weather alerts could save your life. 

The Storm Station is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Severe Weather Awareness Week: Lightning https://www.wbrz.com/news/severe-weather-awareness-week-lightning/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/severe-weather-awareness-week-lightning/ Weather news Thu, 7 Mar 2024 6:42:15 AM Storm Station Team Severe Weather Awareness Week: Lightning

Lightning is a severe weather threat that can occur in any storm. From a pop-up summer storm to a category 5 Hurricane, lightning is a very intense and life threatening weather phenomena. It's important to remember that thunder is a RESULT of lightning, and if you hear thunder roar, head indoors. In fact, lightning can strikes miles from a storm, even when it is not currently raining in your location. 

The Storm Station is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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A bow without rain https://www.wbrz.com/news/a-bow-without-rain/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/a-bow-without-rain/ Weather news Wed, 6 Mar 2024 5:07:14 PM Chief Meteorologist Dr. Josh Eachus A bow without rain

GONZALES – Storm Station viewer Ami Barden spotted a colorless half circle, or bow, across the horizon in Gonzales on Wednesday morning. It was not a gray rainbow. In fact it had not rained all night. However, there was fog. This was what is known as a fogbow.

A fogbow forms very much like a rainbow as sunlight interacts with water droplets. The drops found in fog are 10 to 1000 times smaller than in rain, only about 0.1 millimeters in diameter.

Just like in a rainbow, the observer has sunlight behind and water droplets in front. The key difference with a fogbow is the visual process at work. A rainbow is formed via refraction—that is when light passing from air through a more dense raindrop, it disperses and changes color. A fogbow is formed via diffraction—that is when the light broadens through the droplet and blurs the colors causing it to appear white. This is also why a fogbow appears much brighter than a rainbow.

The fog has to be fairly thin and diffused in order for a fogbow to appear. Sometimes, multiple pale colored rings called a glory will appear at the center of a fogbow.

When you see weather happening, share it with us! Email photos to weather@wbrz.com or submit them via the Storm Station Weather App.


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Severe Weather Awareness Week: Flooding https://www.wbrz.com/news/severe-weather-awareness-week-flooding/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/severe-weather-awareness-week-flooding/ Weather news Wed, 6 Mar 2024 6:07:26 AM Storm Station Team Severe Weather Awareness Week: Flooding

As we focus on the hazards of flooding for the third day of Severe Weather Awareness Week, it's important to remember simple flood safety protocols. When driving, it is always best to "turn around, don't drown" when encountering a flooded roadway and if possible, move to higher ground during any flood event! 

The Storm Station is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Severe Weather Awareness Week: Severe Thunderstorms https://www.wbrz.com/news/severe-weather-awareness-week-severe-thunderstorms/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/severe-weather-awareness-week-severe-thunderstorms/ Weather news Tue, 5 Mar 2024 7:51:52 AM Storm Station Team Severe Weather Awareness Week: Severe Thunderstorms

As Severe Weather Awareness Week continues, we turn our focus to the dangers of Severe Thunderstorms. When Severe thunderstorm warnings are issued in your area, treat them with the same caution you would a Tornado Warning. Severe storms can contain damaging winds, large hailstones, as well as spin up tornadoes. It is important you keep weather alert notifications turned on during any severe weather event. 

The Storm Station is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Severe Weather Awareness Week: Tornadoes https://www.wbrz.com/news/severe-weather-awareness-week-tornadoes/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/severe-weather-awareness-week-tornadoes/ Weather news Mon, 4 Mar 2024 7:18:48 AM Storm Station Team Severe Weather Awareness Week: Tornadoes

We kick off Severe Weather Awareness Week with the focus on Tornadoes. As most know, tornadoes can spin up quickly and do damage just as fast. The sporadic nature of tornadoes makes them one of the most dangerous and life-threatening weather phenomena that occur in southern Louisiana.

It is extremely important to stay alert on days that tornadoes are a threat and always make sure to keep weather notifications turned ON! The free Storm Station app, downloadable HERE, is able to send any severe weather alerts straight to your phone in a timely manner.  


The Storm Station is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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The science behind leap days: what would happen if they didn't exist https://www.wbrz.com/news/the-science-behind-leap-days-what-would-happen-if-they-didn-t-exist/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/the-science-behind-leap-days-what-would-happen-if-they-didn-t-exist/ Weather news Thu, 29 Feb 2024 5:44:54 PM Meteorologist Malcolm Byron The science behind leap days: what would happen if they didn't exist

This year, we find an extra date on our calendars – February 29. Although we tack on another day to winter, the added leap day ensures we don’t see winter shifting around on the calendar.

We define one year as 365 days. This is almost consistent with the time it takes for the Earth to make one complete orbit around the Sun. The difference between the two is about a quarter of a day, or six hours.

At face value, it doesn't seem like a huge deal. But if we multiply that discrepancy over four years, our calendars would then be one day off. To account for this difference, we add a leap day every four years.

What if we didn’t have leap years? Over 100 years, the seasons would shift by 24 days. Over 750 years, that shift is closer to six months. In that case, we’d see our coldest winter nights in July.

Even with the standard leap day adjustment, it’s not perfect. We would still find an 11 minute and 14 second difference on average between our calendar year and the Earth’s orbit. For this reason, we have a few exceptions. If a year coincides with the turn of a century and is not divisible by 400, it does not become a leap year. For instance, 2000 was a leap year, but 1700, 1800, and 1900 were not.

With this correction, we only see a one-day shift in the seasons every 3,333 years.


The Storm Station is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Last chance: Our final opportunity to see a solar eclipse for decades https://www.wbrz.com/news/last-chance-our-final-opportunity-to-see-a-solar-eclipse-for-decades/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/last-chance-our-final-opportunity-to-see-a-solar-eclipse-for-decades/ Weather news Tue, 27 Feb 2024 3:17:41 PM Meteorologist Malcolm Byron Last chance: Our final opportunity to see a solar eclipse for decades

BATON ROUGE - On Monday, April 8th, 2024, another solar eclipse takes over skies across North America. Solar eclipses happen when the Moon passes between the Earth and Sun at a position where the Moon casts a shadow on the Earth. Those caught in the path of this shadow experience the eclipse.

The path of totality will miss southeast Louisiana to the north and west. This means that local areas will not see the Moon cover the Sun completely. However, we will still be able to observe a partial solar eclipse. The partial eclipse begins at 12:28 p.m. and will end at 3:08 p.m.. The maximum eclipse will occur at 1:49 p.m. when 86% of the Sun will be obscured in the Baton Rouge area.

If you’re willing to travel, you can see the eclipse reach totality in the following nearby cities: Dallas, Waco, Austin, and Texarkana. The path of totality extends northeast toward New England.

The Northeast tends to deal with more cloud cover from a historical perspective in early April. Less cloud cover generally occurs in the South, which might be good if your plans take you to Texas or Arkansas to see the eclipse.

Please remember that eye protection is REQUIRED to view the solar eclipse. It is not safe to look at the eclipse through sunglasses, unfiltered camera lenses, telescopes, or binoculars. The intense solar energy will damage your eye’s retina without proper eye protection. In many cases, it takes hours to days until you realize the damage done.

The only safe time to look at the Sun during a solar eclipse is during the short window of maximum totality. That will not happen in Baton Rouge on April 8th, meaning that there is no safe point to look at the Sun with the naked eye.

You need special solar filters/viewers that meet “ISO 12312-2” standards for safe viewing. Before using, inspect them to ensure that they aren't scratched, punctured, or torn. You can find a list of suppliers HERE.

Of course, we will only see the eclipse as long as cloud cover permits. You can find the latest 7-day forecast and real time weather updates HERE.

 


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Looking long-term: What the latest weather outlook for March doesn't tell you https://www.wbrz.com/news/looking-long-term-what-the-latest-weather-outlook-for-march-doesn-t-tell-you/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/looking-long-term-what-the-latest-weather-outlook-for-march-doesn-t-tell-you/ Weather news Tue, 20 Feb 2024 4:45:14 PM Meteorologist Malcolm Byron Looking long-term: What the latest weather outlook for March doesn't tell you

Though warm for the last week of February, Mother Nature may flip the script for the month of March. The latest outlook from the Climate Prediction Center reveals much of the Deep South having a shot at seeing below normal temperatures.

If you put a number on it, southeast Louisiana has roughly a 45% chance of seeing temperatures below average for the month of March. While these odds might appear worse than flipping a coin, that isn’t necessarily the case. To see why, we need to separate temperatures into three groups – below average, near average, and above average.

Meteorologists and climatologists refer to these categories as terciles. With a 45% chance of seeing below average temperatures, the other 55% must be divided between the near and above average terciles. We find that the chance of being below average dominates over the other categories after doing so. In fact, the chance of seeing above average temperatures is slim.

It’s not perfect, and we do play a game a chance to some extent. However, this is the best tool we have to see how conditions might shape up beyond the next seven days.

These forecasts do come with some caveats. Even if this upcoming March ends up cooler than normal, it does NOT mean that there won’t be any warm spells. It doesn’t guarantee that the month will be bitterly cold either. Rather, the 45% chance of below normal temperatures means that the average high/low from March 1-31 is favored to be less than the average monthly temperature of 62°.

Forecasters must take several factors into account when making monthly forecast, a few of which are: El Niño/La Niña, Ocean Currents, Oceanic Heat Content, Soil Moisture, Health of Vegetation, Snowpack/Snowmelt, and Sea Ice.

Another factor to consider is the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). The MJO at its simplest level is a traveling package of enhanced/suppressed tropical rainfall. These regions of rainfall or lack thereof move eastward across the globe. Unlike the weather which can be predicted up to seven days, the MJO can be predicted 2-3 weeks in advance.

The MJO has been active in the last several weeks. A region of enhanced storminess associated with the MJO appears to push closer to the Indian Ocean in the next few weeks. For this reason, southern Louisiana is forecast to have a potentially cooler than normal March.

The Storm Station is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Much of Capital Region sees drought conditions end https://www.wbrz.com/news/much-of-capital-region-sees-drought-conditions-end/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/much-of-capital-region-sees-drought-conditions-end/ Weather news Thu, 8 Feb 2024 10:06:14 AM Meteorologist Emma Kate Cowan Much of Capital Region sees drought conditions end

2024 has brought Louisiana multiple rounds of beneficial rainfall already. The month of January recorded 7.84" of rain in the Baton Rouge area. As a result, the capital city has been taken out of drought altogether.

Three months ago, over 70% of the state was in an exceptional drought, the worst designation. As of today, all of Louisiana is neither included in the exceptional nor the extreme category. Roughly 28% of the state is not classified under any level of drought, including a significant portion of southern Louisiana.

This update comes as we continue to experience wet weather as we get closer to the weekend. Get the latest 7-day forecast and real time weather updates HERE.


The Storm Station is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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PHOTOS: Ice left behind after Monday night's round of wintry weather https://www.wbrz.com/news/photos-ice-left-behind-after-monday-night-s-round-of-wintry-weather/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/photos-ice-left-behind-after-monday-night-s-round-of-wintry-weather/ Weather news Tue, 16 Jan 2024 9:01:36 AM Meteorologist Malcolm Byron PHOTOS: Ice left behind after Monday night's round of wintry weather

Many Storm Station viewers woke up to an icy scene across the capital area after a round of freezing rain on Monday night. Photos show ice all along cars, trash cans, siding, fountains, and trees. 

Ice caused quite the headache for travelers early on Tuesday as many major roadways were shut down. Read more on the treacherous roads from Tuesday morning HERE.

With the sun poking out and temperatures eventually rising above freezing, the ice should melt as Tuesday progresses. Get the latest 7-day forecast and real time weather updates HERE.

See weather happening? Snap it and send it to the Storm Station via email to weather@wbrz.com or tweet @WBRZweather.


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'Zipper in the sky:' Unique cloud feature spotted across Baton Rouge skies https://www.wbrz.com/news/zipper-in-the-sky-unique-cloud-feature-spotted-across-baton-rouge-skies/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/zipper-in-the-sky-unique-cloud-feature-spotted-across-baton-rouge-skies/ Weather news Wed, 10 Jan 2024 6:13:52 PM Meteorologist Malcolm Byron 'Zipper in the sky:' Unique cloud feature spotted across Baton Rouge skies

Several Storm Station viewers spotted an interesting cloud feature in the sky on Wednesday. Rebecka Miller saw the strange cloud formation over Morgan City, noting that it looked like a “zipper in the sky.”

Photos reveal a deck of cirrocumulus clouds (high clouds with a lumpy appearance) being separated by a sudden line of clearing. Within this line of clearing, we find embedded cirrus clouds (thin, wispy clouds composed of ice crystals).

This feature is known as a distrail – short for dissipation trail. Distrails form when planes fly through a cloud composed of both supercooled water and ice. The disruption of the airflow created by the aircraft allows the water to evaporate and deposit onto the ice crystals. The removal of the water droplets produces a sharp line of clearing with clouds composed of ice mixed in.

Another photo from Wednesday afternoon reveals a similar phenomenon known as a hole punch cloud. The formation process is exactly the same but occurs when aircraft passes through a water/ice cloud during takeoff or landing. Hole punch clouds have more of a circular appearance.

The Storm Station is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.

 


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National Weather Service confirms EF-0 damage near Labadieville https://www.wbrz.com/news/national-weather-service-confirms-ef-0-damage-near-labadieville/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/national-weather-service-confirms-ef-0-damage-near-labadieville/ Weather news Mon, 8 Jan 2024 11:15:32 PM The Storm Station Meteorologists National Weather Service confirms EF-0 damage near Labadieville

LABADIEVILLE - The National Weather Service determined that an EF-0 tornado touched down in Assumption Parish on Monday afternoon. The NWS storm survey stated that wind speeds peaked around 80 miles per hour. The tornado was on the ground for about one minute, tracking 0.8 miles.

The survey noted that the tornado touched down at the intersection of Highway 1011 and Supreme Cross Road in Supreme. The tornado tracking northeast along Highway 1011. The west side of the road sustained the most damage, all to mobile homes. To the east of the highway, only minor roof/gutter damage was observed with a few well-built homes. The tornado was also able to scatter debris far away from where it originated.

Residents nearby shared photos showing damage from the storm that moved through just before 4 p.m. Pictures showed the roof of a thrift store knocked off and debris scattered through the streets. Multiple areas in the town were flooded.

Later the Labadieville Volunteer Fire Department posted pictures to social media of damage that occurred when a mobile home was launched into their fire station. Pictures showed two walls with holes in them. The mobile home was completely destroyed. Some pictures showed children's toys mixed in with the storm debris. No injuries were reported. 

A SEVERE T-STORM WARNING was issued for this storm around 3:23 p.m. In the warning, NWS stated that a severe thunderstorm moving northeast from Stephensville at 35mph could produce wind damage to roofs, siding and trees and added that in Napoleonville, Supreme, Labadieville, Paincourtville, and Belle Rose. The warning reminded that tornadoes can develop quickly from severe thunderstorms.

The Storm Station is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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PHOTOS: Labadieville buildings damaged by Monday afternoon storms https://www.wbrz.com/news/photos-labadieville-buildings-damaged-by-monday-afternoon-storms/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/photos-labadieville-buildings-damaged-by-monday-afternoon-storms/ Weather news Mon, 8 Jan 2024 5:39:37 PM WBRZ Staff PHOTOS: Labadieville buildings damaged by Monday afternoon storms

LABADIEVILLE - Storms that rolled through Assumption Parish on Monday evening took down trees, damaged buildings and knocked out power to some Labadieville residents. 

Pictures showed the roof of a thrift store knocked off and debris scattered through the streets. Multiple areas in the town were flooded. 

The Labadieville Volunteer Fire Department was damaged as the wind picked up a mobile home that crashed into the fire stations. Pictures showed two walls with holes in them. The mobile home was completely destroyed. Some pictures showed children's toys mixed in with the storm debris. No injuries were reported. 

                           


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