WBRZ https://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Weather news Weather news en-us Copyright 2022, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Sat, 28 May 2022 HH:05:ss GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ https://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 NOAA predicting above average tropical activity for the 7th consecutive year https://www.wbrz.com/news/noaa-predicting-above-average-tropical-activity-for-the-7th-consecutive-year/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/noaa-predicting-above-average-tropical-activity-for-the-7th-consecutive-year/ Weather news Tue, 24 May 2022 8:26:40 AM The Storm Station Meteorologists NOAA predicting above average tropical activity for the 7th consecutive year

With a little more than one week before the official start of hurricane season and days after the first named storm of the year, tropical experts with the National Hurricane Center are predicting above average activity this hurricane season for the 7th year in a row.

Their forecast calls for: 14-21 named storms, 6-10 hurricanes and 3-6 major hurricanes (category 3 strength or higher). The outlook predicts a 65% chance of an above-normal season, a 25% chance of a near-normal season and only a 10% chance of a below-normal season. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides these numbers with 70% confidence.

NOAA Official Statement

NOAA will re-visit and update their seasonal outlook in August, as we enter the peak months of hurricane season. Annual averages are 14 named storms, 7 hurricanes and 3 major hurricanes. Earlier this year, another reputable research outfit at Colorado State University predicted 19 named storms and 9 hurricanes with 4 being considered major. 

The team cited persistent La Niña conditions. Additionally, sea surface temperatures across the Atlantic Basin are slightly above average and are forecast to remain that way. 

La Niña is a pattern, which favors much more activity in the Atlantic Basin during hurricane season. During La Niña, trade winds weaken over the Atlantic Ocean creating a supportive environment for tropical cyclone formation.

Warm sea surface temperatures enhance evaporation and cloud development. In the presence of favorable winds, heat energy from the oceans promotes tropical cyclone strengthening.  

As defined by the NOAA, El Niño and La Niña are the warm and cool phases of a recurring climate pattern across the tropical Pacific—the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, or “ENSO” for short. Keep in mind that El Niño and La Niña do not “cause” any one specific weather event; rather the two phases of ENSO influence change in global climate patterns that then increase the likelihood of specific weather events.  Once again, ENSO is not “to blame” for any one storm system, temperature anomaly or hurricane. If La Niña does indeed persist, the Atlantic Basin faces an increased chance at above average tropical activity. Despite higher chances, it is much too early to determine where storms will develop or where they will go.

The National Hurricane Center and the Storm Station remind that “it only takes one hurricane making landfall to make it an active season for you,” so prepare accordingly. For more on the season ahead and preparedness, visit wbrz.com/weather and click on the hurricane center.

 


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Saharan Dust in South Louisiana https://www.wbrz.com/news/saharan-dust-in-south-louisiana-151598/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/saharan-dust-in-south-louisiana-151598/ Weather news Thu, 19 May 2022 10:31:52 AM WBRZ Meteorologist Saharan Dust in South Louisiana

For the past several years, Saharan dust has successfully made the trek across the Atlantic and appeared here in the Southern U.S.. This year is no exception.

The smallest dust particles from the Saharan desert get swept up into a westerly atmospheric flow and this year, it will be flowing right into the Gulf of Mexico.

What does this mean?

As dust particulates begin to move into our area over the weekend, we could see a decrease in air quality. However, all the rain in the forecast will help filter out large amounts of dust pollution. See the full 7-day forecast here. (Stay with us this week for timely updates on air quality!) Any dust left over will then mostly be seen at sunrise and sunset.


We can expect to see orange and yellow skies. During sunrise and sunset, the sun’s rays travel a long distance through the Earth’s atmosphere. On a normal day, the properties of the atmosphere already allow for colors like red and orange to appear. Cool colors like violets and blues are scattered very efficiently by air particles. Meaning, we don’t see them as much during sunrise and sunset. Warm colors like reds and oranges are not scattered away. Add in some desert dust and we have a perfect recipe for orange skies.


Timeline

The dust will start to enter the Gulf of Mexico on Friday reaching the Louisiana coast late Friday evening. It will continue to file in all weekend, expect to see the highest concentrations on Monday morning.

Send us your photos!

If you see a beautiful sunrise or sunset, please send them to us. We would love to share your pictures! You can email them to weather@wbrz.com, submit them through our WBRZ Weather app, or post them to the WBRZ Weather Facebook Page!

Download our app, WBRZ Weather by clicking these links for Apple or Android devices.

Find us on social media as WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Total lunar eclipse happening May 15th https://www.wbrz.com/news/total-lunar-eclipse-happening-may-15th/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/total-lunar-eclipse-happening-may-15th/ Weather news Sat, 14 May 2022 9:14:53 PM Meteorologist Jacelyn Wheat Total lunar eclipse happening May 15th

Make sure you keep your eyes on the skies! This time it is for a cool reason. Overnight on May 15 into May 16, a total lunar eclipse is happening. A lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth is aligned between the sun and the moon, and the Earth casts a shadow onto the moon. Eclipses only occur when there is a full moon present.

The lunar eclipse will start with the penumbral eclipse, which is not extremely noticeable to the naked eye. This is when the Earth’s shadow starts to move across the moon. This will begin at 8:32 pm CDT.

Once the eclipse stages have started, the shadow will become more noticeable. By 10:29 p.m. CDT, the total eclipse will begin, and it will last until 11:53 p.m. CDT. The moon will have a red shadow cast onto it.

If you don't catch a glimpse of the moon during the total eclipse hours, it's okay because the shadow will not fully go away until 1:50 a.m. CDT.

Our area will have maximum visibility of the lunar eclipse from start to finish! Depending on cloud cover, we should have a perfect view of the eclipse. Be sure to send in any pictures you take to weather@wbrz.com we would love to share them!

Make sure you catch this one, and if you miss it, the next lunar eclipse will be happening on Nov. 8th, 2022.


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Almost Record-Breaking: 91 degrees for the daytime high https://www.wbrz.com/news/almost-record-breaking-91-degrees-for-the-daytime-high/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/almost-record-breaking-91-degrees-for-the-daytime-high/ Weather news Mon, 9 May 2022 4:24:39 PM Meteorologist Jacelyn Wheat Almost Record-Breaking: 91 degrees for the daytime high

Monday has tied the record high of 91° set in 2003. Baton Rouge saw its first 90° day this year on Sunday, May 8th, and the hot days are just getting started. Not only is the air temperature hot but the heat index makes it feel nearly triple digits!

The heat index is influenced by how much available moisture there is in the atmosphere. Here in southern Louisiana, we have a huge moisture source, The Gulf of Mexico. Southerly winds are bringing moisture in from the Gulf. When the relative humidity is high, the rate of evaporation from the body decreases. This means that the temperatures feel warmer to our bodies. This is why the heat index is often referred to as the feels like temperature. The heat index is telling us what our body is feeling based on the moisture content and the air temperate.

Sun and Heat Safety: Some friendly reminders for the hot days ahead—sunburn can occur in less than 15 minutes with the extreme U.V. Index typical of this time of year. In addition to that, heat exhaustion and heat stroke can set in just as quickly. Seek medical attention if you or somebody you know is affected. While we all enjoy a list of cool beverages, be sure water is at least a part of that list! Finally, look before you lock. DO NOT leave people or pets in an unattended car.


Up Next: Heading into the week, we could be flirting with some record-breaking temperatures. A ridge of high pressure has set up across the southeast, locking in the heat. We are seeing very little cloud cover in our area so our daytime temperatures are going to continue to rise.


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Just getting warmed up... Baton Rouge hits 90 for first time in 2022 https://www.wbrz.com/news/just-getting-warmed-up-baton-rouge-hits-90-for-first-time-in-2022/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/just-getting-warmed-up-baton-rouge-hits-90-for-first-time-in-2022/ Weather news Fri, 6 May 2022 9:33:55 PM The Storm Station Meteorologists Just getting warmed up... Baton Rouge hits 90 for first time in 2022

On Sunday at approximately 2:45pm, Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport reached an air temperature of 90 degrees for the first time in 2022. This comes as the Capital Area is just beginning a stretch of unseasonably warm temperatures, with several records possible. CLICK HERE for the latest forecast.

As Baton Rouge anticipates many more 90° high temperatures, here are 9 stats about the 90s.

  1. Baton Rouge reached 90° for the first time in 2021 on April 28.
  2. Annual averages show the Red Stick recording its first 90° temperature by May 14.
  3. The earliest 90° day on record is March 2, 1909. *This is an amazing mark, which distances itself by more than a month from the next earliest 90° reading on April 10, 1908.
  4. The latest into the year it has taken Baton Rouge to reach 90° is June 10, 1950 & June 10, 1976.
  5. The latest into the year, the Capital City has recorded the last 90° high is October 27, 1907.
  6. On average, the last 90° high occurs on October 3.
  7. The earliest that the area has ever experienced the final 90° high for the year was September 6, 1979.  
  8. The maximum number of days that the Capital City has reached 90° or above was 127 in 1963. Two years earlier in 1961, only 30 days reached 90°, the fewest on record.
  9. On average, Baton Rouge spends (can’t make this up) 90 days per year in the 90s.

The Storm Station is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Air Quality Alert Saturday, some may need to limit time outside https://www.wbrz.com/news/air-quality-alert-saturday-some-may-need-to-limit-time-outside/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/air-quality-alert-saturday-some-may-need-to-limit-time-outside/ Weather news Fri, 6 May 2022 3:51:11 PM Chief Meteorologist Dr. Josh Eachus Air Quality Alert Saturday, some may need to limit time outside

An AIR QUALITY ALERT is in effect from 6am Saturday through Midnight for East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge, Livingston, Ascension, Iberville and Pointe Coupee Parishes. Active children and adults, the elderly and people with respiratory diseases such as asthma, should avoid prolonged outdoor exertion.

 

On Saturday, an upper level ridge of high pressure will reduce atmospheric mixing across the region. In addition, sunny skies and high temperatures in the upper 80s and low 90s will enhance ozone development. Furthermore, light southwesterly winds will transport additional smoke into southern Louisiana from the western Gulf, which will contribute to orange level ozone, which is unhealthy for sensitive groups. These conditions may continue on Sunday.

Area residents are encouraged to take one or more of the following voluntary actions to help reduce the formation of ozone:

-Drive less. Carpool, walk and bike, combine errands and care for your car. Be sure your gas cap is on tight

-Refuel your vehicle, mow grass and use gas powered lawn equipment and off road vehicles after 6 p.m.

-Postpone chores that use oil based paint, varnishes and solvents that produce flame

-If you barbecue, use an electric starter instead of starter fluid

-Take your lunch to work or walk to lunch

-Conserve energy in your home


Incorporating these tips into your daily routines can make a significant difference. We all have a stake in better air quality. Spread the word by telling family, friends, co-workers and neighbors about OZONE ACTION DAYS.

 

The STORM STATION is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Excitement in the sky as space rocks blast through atmopshere https://www.wbrz.com/news/excitement-in-the-sky-as-space-rocks-blast-through-atmopshere/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/excitement-in-the-sky-as-space-rocks-blast-through-atmopshere/ Weather news Wed, 27 Apr 2022 5:29:45 PM Chief Meteorologist Dr. Josh Eachus Excitement in the sky as space rocks blast through atmopshere

Many across southeast Louisiana have been reporting "fireballs" or "shooting stars" in the skies. There are two active meteor showers right now that are the likely cause.

The Lyrids is a meteor shower active through April 29th. While these meteors lack persistent trains, they can produce fireballs. The best viewing time is typically around dawn, in the northern hemisphere. 

The eta Aquaridis is a meteor shower active through May 27th. About 10-30 per hour can be seen. The best viewing time is around dawn, in the northern hemisphere, especially near the equator.

According to National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), "Meteoroids are objects in space that range in size from dust grains to small asteroids. When meteoroids enter Earth’s atmosphere at high speed and burn up, the fireballs or shooting stars are called meteors. When a meteoroid survives a trip through the atmosphere and hits the ground, it’s called a meteorite."

It is estimated that about 48.5 tons of meteoritic material falls on the Earth each day. Almost all of it is vaporized in Earth's atmosphere. As this process occurs, there is a bright trail left behind, often visible at the surface.

Meteor showers occur annually as the Earth passes through debris trails left by comets. Meteor showers are usually named after a star or constellation close to where those meteors appear in the sky.

Most meteoroids will break apart in Earth’s atmosphere because traveling at tens of thousands of miles per hour causes them to disintegrate. Most of the time, less than 5 percent of the original space rock will make it down to the ground. Any pieces are very difficult to find, ranging in size from that of a pebble to a fist and they look very much like terrestrial rocks.

If you catch one of these "fireballs" or "shooting stars" send a picture to weather@wbrz.com or tweet @WBRZweather. You can also submit directly to us through the free WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device.


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Ida becomes a retired hurricane name https://www.wbrz.com/news/ida-becomes-a-retired-hurricane-name/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/ida-becomes-a-retired-hurricane-name/ Weather news Wed, 27 Apr 2022 12:50:19 PM WBRZ Weather Team Ida becomes a retired hurricane name

The name, Ida, has been officially retired from the reoccurring storm name list. As we know all too well in south Louisiana, this was a devastating storm. Learn more about the World Meteorological Organization’s (WMO) decision to retire the name HERE.

This is now one of 94 storm names that have been retired. Ida will be replaced with Imani when this name list returns to the rotation in 2027.


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The first 90s of the year could be in South Louisiana this week https://www.wbrz.com/news/the-first-90s-of-the-year-could-be-in-south-louisiana-this-week/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/the-first-90s-of-the-year-could-be-in-south-louisiana-this-week/ Weather news Wed, 20 Apr 2022 8:09:12 AM Meteorologist Marisa Nuzzo The first 90s of the year could be in South Louisiana this week

It is nearly a guarantee that 90s will return to the forecast, but the question is when?

The WBRZ Weather Team is forecasting upper 80s for the Baton Rouge area through the weekend. Some parts of south Louisiana could see 90° before the week is over.

Baton Rouge typically sees its first 90° around May 13th. The earliest 90° on record came in on March 17th, 1963. The latest date 90° made the forecast was June 10th, 1976.

The normal or average high temperature for the end of April is 80°. That means a short stretch of unseasonable warmth needs to move over the area in order to hit 90°. The Climate Prediction Center regularly issues 8 -14 day temperature outlooks for the entire United States. The most recent outlook has south Louisiana in the blue, meaning temperatures will likely be slightly cooler than that 80° average. The warmup coming later this week will likely be the only opportunity to see the 90s before temperatures level back out early next week. Early May will be the next best chance to see 90°.

Baton Rouge has seen 90° (or warmer) every year since records started in 1930. On average, there are about 90 days a year with temperatures 90° or higher. 

Once Baton Rouge hits 90°, the Weather Team will start the annual count of 90 days in the 90s. 

Download the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. We will send a notification to your phone to let you know when Baton Rouge hits 90° for the first time! 




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April's Pink Moon https://www.wbrz.com/news/april-s-pink-moon/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/april-s-pink-moon/ Weather news Sat, 16 Apr 2022 6:53:15 PM Meteorologist Jacelyn Wheat April's Pink Moon

Be sure to have your eyes on the skies tonight. The moon is putting on a show. The April full moon is here!

Some areas will be seeing cloudy conditions overnight, making viewing the Pink full moon a challenge.

The Pink full moon this year is also the Paschal moon — the first full moon of spring. Easter is always celebrated the first Sunday after the Paschal moon.

The Pink moon will reach its peak at 3:57 p.m. CDT, but it will not be visible until after sunset.The Pink moon is not called that because it has a pink hue. The name is actually based on the springtime flowers that are native to eastern North America, the pink phlox. The full moon names are influenced by a number of cultures.

A viewer, Kendyl, sent in this wonderful picture of the moon tonight taken with a telescope!

Unfortunately, some parts of the area will not have a crystal clear view, but you could experience a break in the cloud cover and see this sight!

If you get a glimpse of the full moon, be sure to send in your pictures to weather@wbrz.com.


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Quiet weather, colorful sky: rainbows and halos seen on Thursday https://www.wbrz.com/news/quiet-weather-colorful-sky-rainbows-and-halos-seen-on-thursday/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/quiet-weather-colorful-sky-rainbows-and-halos-seen-on-thursday/ Weather news Thu, 14 Apr 2022 9:27:58 PM Chief Meteorologist Dr. Josh Eachus Quiet weather, colorful sky: rainbows and halos seen on Thursday

Even when the weather is quiet, there is almost always something to see in the sky! WBRZ Weather viewers can be counted on to do just that, and send in their beautiful pictures.

On Thursday, Catherine Chachere spotted rainbow clouds in Denham Springs. These are caused by cloud iridescence. It usually happens in high clouds, like cirrus, because of diffraction – a phenomenon that occurs when small water droplets or small ice crystals scatter the sun's light. Cloud iridescence is relatively rare. The cloud must be thin and have lots of water droplets or ice crystals of about the same size. When that happens, the sun's rays encounter just a few droplets at at time.

Alisa Ransome saw a similar process happening with a halo around the afternoon sun. These too are noticed in very thin clouds made up of tiny droplets or crystals. The halos are caused by both refraction, or splitting of light, and also by reflection of light. You can also see a halo around the moon sometimes, but they are less colorful, simply because moonlight is not as bright as sunlight.

What Catherine and Alisa may not have known when sending in these pictures, is that they were helping out with the weather forecast! High, thin clouds such as cirrus are often the first type of cloud that appears before a storm system or front moves into an area. Humidity, thicker clouds and even a few showers are all expected to return on Friday. CLICK HERE for the detailed WBRZ Weather forecast blog.

If you see interesting weather happening, send a picture to weather@wbrz.com or tweet @WBRZweather. You can also submit directly to us through the free WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device.

 


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Red Flag Warning issued, burning not advised on Friday https://www.wbrz.com/news/red-flag-warning-issued-burning-not-advised-on-friday/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/red-flag-warning-issued-burning-not-advised-on-friday/ Weather news Thu, 7 Apr 2022 9:04:37 PM Chief Meteorologist Dr. Josh Eachus Red Flag Warning issued, burning not advised on Friday

The National Weather Service has issued a RED FLAG WARNING due to critical fire conditions for all of south Louisiana and southwest Mississippi from 10am to 7pm Friday.

The combination of low relative humidity near or below 20 percent and winds of 15 to 20 mph with higher gusts will produce a high fire danger across the area on Friday. To get the detailed forecast for Friday and the weekend, CLICK HERE.

Any fires that develop will likely spread rapidly. Outdoor burning is not advised.

A Red Flag Warning means that critical fire weather conditions are either occurring now, or will shortly. A combination of strong winds, low relative humidity, and warm temperatures can all contribute to volatile fire behavior.

The Storm Station is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App on your Apple or Android device. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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CSU: 2022 hurricane season is predicted to be another active one https://www.wbrz.com/news/csu-2022-hurricane-season-is-predicted-to-be-another-active-one/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/csu-2022-hurricane-season-is-predicted-to-be-another-active-one/ Weather news Thu, 7 Apr 2022 9:14:38 AM The Storm Station Meteorologists CSU: 2022 hurricane season is predicted to be another active one

The first outlook for the 2022 hurricane season is out. Colorado State University is predicting an above average number of named storms, hurricanes, and major hurricanes. The probability of a major hurricane strike is also above average.

This is very similar to outlooks issued in April of 2020 and 2021.

Dr. Philip Klotzbach and the research team cited an absence of El Niño and  La Niña conditions likely to transition into neutral ENSO phase.

As defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), El Niño and La Niña are the warm and cool phases of a recurring climate pattern across the tropical Pacific—the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, or “ENSO” for short. Keep in mind that El Niño and La Niña do not “cause” any one specific weather event; rather the two phases of ENSO influence change in global climate patterns that then increase the likelihood of specific weather events. Once again, ENSO is not “to blame” for any one storm system, temperature anomaly or hurricane.

La Niña is a pattern, which favors much more activity in the Atlantic Basin during hurricane season. During La Niña, trade winds weaken over the Atlantic Ocean creating a supportive environment for tropical cyclone formation. Transitioning away from La Niña means these more favorable conditions go away, but without a full transition to El Niño, there are no major limiting factors.

The forecast is based on an extended-range early April statistical prediction scheme that was developed using 38 years of past data. These seasonal forecasts were originally developed by the late Dr. William Gray, who was lead author on these predictions for over 20 years and continued as a co-author until his death in 2018. You can review the entire prediction, the scientific explanation and the reason such a forecast is made, RIGHT HERE. Seasonal updates are issued on June 2nd, July 7th, and August 4th.

The researchers at Colorado State University and the WBRZ Weather Team remind that “it only takes one hurricane making landfall to make it an active season for you,” so prepare accordingly. NOAA’s official outlook is expected in Late May. For more on the season ahead and preparedness, visit wbrz.com/weather and click on the hurricane center.


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Hurricane Ida post-analysis report released from the National Hurricane Center https://www.wbrz.com/news/hurricane-ida-post-analysis-report-released-from-the-national-hurricane-center/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/hurricane-ida-post-analysis-report-released-from-the-national-hurricane-center/ Weather news Tue, 5 Apr 2022 10:29:03 AM Meteorologist Jake Dalton Hurricane Ida post-analysis report released from the National Hurricane Center

The National Hurricane Center has released their post-analysis report on Hurricane Ida. Hurricane Ida's landfall intensity was kept at Category 4 with maximum sustained winds of 150 mph. The storm caused $75 billion in damage and 49 direct fatalities.

Every season, the National Hurricane Center will go back through radar and satellite data, as well as observed wind and storm surge reports to make a final classification on the intensity of a storm. In recent years, Hurricane Michael was originally classified as a Category 4 hurricane at landfall, but was upgraded to a Category 5 in post-analysis after finding a small sample of 160mph winds near the Florida coast.

You can read the full report from the National Hurricane Center HERE.


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Mardi Gras sundog spotted in Zachary https://www.wbrz.com/news/mardi-gras-sundog-spotted-in-zachary/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/mardi-gras-sundog-spotted-in-zachary/ Weather news Tue, 1 Mar 2022 6:39:00 PM Chief Meteorologist Dr. Josh Eachus Mardi Gras sundog spotted in Zachary

ZACHARY - A WBRZ Weather viewer snapped an uncommon photo on Tuesday evening. About one hour before sunset, the team was sent a photo of what appears to be a sundog.

Sundogs are colored spots of light that develop due to the refraction of light through ice crystals. Typically, they appear about 22 degrees either direction from the sun (sometimes on both sides), depending on where the ice crystals are present. Colors usually go from red closest to the sun, out to blue on the outside of the sundog.

The type of ice crystals needed to produce a sundog are often found in high, thin clouds like cirrus, which were present in southeast Louisiana on Tuesday evening. Sundogs are also known as mock suns or parhelia, which means "with the sun".

Photo credit: Ashley Darsey

See weather happening? Snap it and send it to the WBRZ Weather Team via email weather@wbrz.com or tweet @WBRZweather.


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Drought Monitor: Some improvements to the local area https://www.wbrz.com/news/drought-monitor-some-improvements-to-the-local-area/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/drought-monitor-some-improvements-to-the-local-area/ Weather news Tue, 1 Mar 2022 11:58:45 AM Meteorologist Marisa Nuzzo Drought Monitor: Some improvements to the local area

The Baton Rouge area is no longer under extreme drought, but severe drought continues.

After 2021 finished as the third wettest year on record for Baton Rouge, drought conditions persist across south Louisiana.

After several rounds of rain, we are finally seeing some improvement to the drought monitor. South Louisiana is still far behind on rainfall. So far this year, Baton Rouge has picked up 15.12 inches of rain. Baton Rouge typically accumulates 24.66 inches of rain by this week in the year.

 

There are five classifications of drought. 

D0 - Abnormally Dry

D1 - Moderate Drought

D2 - Severe Drought

D3 - Extreme Drought

D4 - Exceptional Drought

The Parishes in the WBRZ viewing area currently have drought conditions that range from moderately dry(D1) to extremely dry(D3). Extreme drought is now isolated to coastal locations.

As drought is uncommon for this region, the symptoms have been mild thus far. The few instances of grass fires in the area may become more common as drought continues. Under an extreme drought grass stops growing, trees are stressed and creeks and bayous are low. 

Historically, extreme drought conditions lead to a number of problems. Rice crops become more expensive to maintain, soybean yields are also reduced. While the rivers and bayous are low, saltwater can intrude. That makes river water too salty for irrigation. Trees continue to be drought stressed and the crawfish population falls. Water pressure may fall and officials may ask for voluntary water restrictions. The burn ban from February was lifted, but a new one could be added as fires become more difficult to extinguish. Springtime allergies may worsen and the air quality may drop. 

WBRZ keeps a crawfish price index. CLICK HERE to check it out.

The drought conditions are monitored and updated weekly. Stay with The Storm Station for updates as they become available.  


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Has Baton Rouge had its last freeze this season? https://www.wbrz.com/news/has-baton-rouge-had-its-last-freeze-this-season-/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/has-baton-rouge-had-its-last-freeze-this-season-/ Weather news Thu, 24 Feb 2022 4:15:46 PM Meteorologist Jake Dalton Has Baton Rouge had its last freeze this season?

Many have asked the question over the last week: Are we anticipating another freeze this season? Can I start planting again?

The quick answer: another freeze or hard freeze is not likely this season. The average last freeze date for Baton Rouge is February 23. While a freeze has occurred as late as April 13, the chances of a freeze occurring after February 23 is much lower. Spring officially begins on March 20.





Looking at the latest forecast trends, the long range 8-14 day outlook and even monthly temperature outlook shows an above normal chance for temperatures to trend above average. While above average does not always mean super warm, it does indicate a very low chance of another freeze occurring.


Our temperature model guidance does not hint at a freeze as well, through the middle of March. I say, go ahead and plant away!


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Mardi Gras Climatology - New Orleans https://www.wbrz.com/news/mardi-gras-climatology-new-orleans/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/mardi-gras-climatology-new-orleans/ Weather news Thu, 24 Feb 2022 3:15:12 PM Meteorologist Jake Dalton Mardi Gras Climatology - New Orleans

Temperatures are forecast to be just below average for next 5 days leading up to Fat Tuesday. This is will be comfortable weather for all the parades and events.

From February 24 - March 1 average high temperatures are between 68 and 69 degrees, with average low temperatures of 51 and 52 degrees.

The coldest Mardi Gras on record was set just last year with a high temperature of 33 degrees in New Orleans. The cold probably would have kept most inside anyways, had there been an actual Mardi Gras in 2021.

The warmest temperature was recorded on February 20, 1917 and February 9, 1932 of 83 degrees. Only 7 out of the last 147 Mardi Gras Days had temperatures of 80 degrees or higher.

Rain has fallen on many parades as well, in fact, 47 out of 147 Mardi Gras Days (from 1874-2021) have received measurable rainfall. The wettest Mardi Gras was 2.12 inches of rainfall on March 1, 1927.


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Cold front at a standstill causing large temperature change over the area https://www.wbrz.com/news/cold-front-at-a-standstill-causing-large-temperature-change-over-the-area/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/cold-front-at-a-standstill-causing-large-temperature-change-over-the-area/ Weather news Wed, 23 Feb 2022 10:45:19 AM Meteorologist Marisa Nuzzo Cold front at a standstill causing large temperature change over the area

Can you spot the cold front?

A cold front has entered the WBRZ viewing area and it’s not moving. South Louisiana is no stranger to a cold front or big temperature changes, but this one may be a first for some. Instead of moving through in a couple hours, this one will take a couple days.

This front is an invisible boundary between warm, humid air and much cooler, drier air. Temperatures on the north side of the front will be at least 10 degrees cooler than those on the south side and humidity will be noticeably less. Places like New Roads, St. Francisville, and Woodville will continue to be on the cool side of this front through Thursday. 

While Baton Rouge will have near record heat this afternoon with temperatures in the low 80s, spots like St.Francisville will struggle to reach 70°. 

Temperatures across the WBRZ viewing area will span nearly 20 degrees on Thursday morning because of this boundary. 

Late Thursday night, the front will pick up the pace and push all the way to the coastline. All areas will get a taste of the cooler air come Friday morning. Some spotty showers will come along with it too. Check out the full forecast from your Storm Station Meteorologists here. 


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Beyond the 7-Day Forecast: The 8-14 Day Outlook https://www.wbrz.com/news/beyond-the-7-day-forecast-the-8-14-day-outlook/ https://www.wbrz.com/news/beyond-the-7-day-forecast-the-8-14-day-outlook/ Weather news Thu, 17 Feb 2022 4:38:09 PM Meteorologist Jake Dalton Beyond the 7-Day Forecast: The 8-14 Day Outlook

The new 8-14 day temperature outlook from the Climate Prediction Center shows a return of below average temperatures across much of the United States. Winter is not on its way out just yet.

Here in south Louisiana, there is a 50-60% chance of temperatures below average. At this point in the year, in Baton Rouge, our average high is 67 degrees and average low is 46 degrees.




It has been very dry over the last 5 months, but there is signal that our chances for rain may stay elevated past the next seven days. The Climate Prediction Center is forecasting near normal precipitation over Louisiana in their 8-14 day outlook.

The latest drought monitor was released today and continues to show severe drought conditions across much of south central Louisiana. With today's rain maker and more on the way next week, we should be able to chip away at some of the drought by next weeks update.



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