Pat Shingleton: "The Longest Burning Bulb and 1898..."

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Light is defined as the phenomenon of luminous radiation from the sun, other stars and bright objects.  The sun is expected to continue shining for another 5 billion years. There's another simple light that has lit a firehouse since their pumper was pulled by a horse. In 1901, the bulb provided enough light for the firefighters to light their kerosene lanterns and go to the fire.  It's called the Livermore bulb, and has been burning for 117 years. On May 21, 2013 the bulb went out at 6:13 A.M. but came-back-on at 6:17 A.M.. The 4-watt bulb with the curly carbon filament was made by the Shelby Electric Co. in Ohio that went out of business in 1912. The designer was Adolphe A. Chaillet and included a carbon filament. The loop inside the bulb, from below, looks like the word "no" in cursive. It's the longest burning bulb ever. Hurricane Season 2018 ends today with plenty of unfortunate memories for folks on the Florida Panhandle. Another incident identifies the weather on the Saturday evening after Thanksgiving, 1898 in New England that was rapidly deteriorating. In 90-mile-per-hour winds and 30-foot-seas, The Portland’s captain was known as a "storm racer" and would regularly make runs from Boston to Portland, Maine.  The steamship was designed for flat coastal bays and went down at 9:30 PM that was verified by pocket watches that came ashore. It was a victim of “The 1898 Hurricane" that claimed 190 lives and was one of the worst in New England history. One hundred and fifty ships went down that night and in August of 2002 the wreckage of the Portland was located.