Pat Shingleton: "The Leaves and New Founbdland..."

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Fall foliage in New England is called second to none and Southern New England attracts a vast amount of leaf-peepers. This area is composed of three small states: Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts.  Rhode Island is the smallest, measuring about 30 miles across with Connecticut the third smallest. Weatherwise Magazine reported that balanced precipitation and consistent seasonal temperature variations support both agriculture and industry. The availability of year-long precipitation and melting snows allow for plentiful vegetative growth. In addition to the luxurious fall foliage, harvest-time also includes a large portion of the nation’s cranberry crop and apple harvest ranks high in the nation’s cash receipts per acre.  Should your travels take you to New England before the end of the month the peak period for leaf-changing displays are underway. In addition, there’s a small fishing village in Newfoundland that is recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as the foggiest place in the world.  Trepassey, located on the Avalon Peninsula, averages 160 days of fog per year.  Newfoundland’s provincial capital, St. John, north of Trepassey, experiences 124 days of fog per year.  St. John is also the rainiest with 60 inches or five feet of rain each year.  Hold on, there are a few more distinctions for this town, it’s also the snowiest with 1414.34 inches; the windiest with a daily average of 15 mph; the cloudiest with only 1,497 hours of sunshine and having the greatest number of days of freezing rain per year at 38.  Lovely...