WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Weather Weather en-us Copyright 2016, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Thu, 26 May 2016 12:05:58 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Your Memorial Day Weekend weather planner http://www.wbrz.com/news/your-memorial-day-weekend-weather-planner/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/your-memorial-day-weekend-weather-planner/ Weather Thu, 26 May 2016 5:57:08 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Your Memorial Day Weekend weather planner

As vacations and outdoor activities kick into gear for the long weekend, here is a summary of what you can expect in the Baton Rouge area and nearby destinations.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: Persistence is the pattern into Thursday. Partly sunny skies and temperatures in the upper 80s will give way to a few pulse showers and thunderstorms during the afternoon hours. Again, rain coverage across the forecast area will be low. At night, any action will dissipate with a low failing to leave the 70s.

Up Next: For the Memorial Day Weekend, Friday to Monday, expect the main feature to be warm and humid conditions. Highs will flirt with 90 degrees while lows struggle to leave the 70s. The UV Index will be extremely high leaving sunburn times under 15 minutes. Thus, sunscreen will be important if spending extended time outdoors, like at the Jambalaya Festival in Gonzales. If there are any pop-up showers and thunderstorms, they will be isolated and limited to the afternoon hours. This means that all of the headlining acts at Bayou Country Superfest should go on without a hitch. Saturday seems to provide the best (but still low) chance at some activity. Please keep in mind, even if it is sunny, the sound of thunder means you are close enough to be struck by lightning. Just take a moment inside for any stray storms to pass and then continue on with outdoor plans. Those heading toward the coast will find even lower rain chances and slightly lower high temperatures.

THE SCIENCE:

Forecast Discussion: Some interesting and opposing features at play this afternoon make it difficult to predict whether or not there will be any pop-up showers. The upper level jet stream is weaker than yesterday and the capping ridge has bulged back to the north—two factors working against development. However, some energy moving through the mid-levels may create enough vorticity and uplift to support some activity. There will certainly be enough warmth and humidity available. In sum, we’ll carry the mention of a few showers in siding with forecast model output. By Saturday, the region will come as close as it will to a flattening trough in the Midwest. The axis of this trough lining up with Louisiana may result in some isolated showers and thunderstorms. For Sunday and Monday, a weak surface high pressure and very calm upper level conditions will likely result in the Central Gulf Coast staying entirely dry. Not much change is expected into the middle of next week. High temperatures will be fairly steady in the upper 80s to nearly 90 degrees. Days featuring more sunshine will obviously top out on the warm side while areas that receive showers may hang on to slightly lower numbers. 

The Tropics: While the local area remains under the influence of a shifting ridge, a deep trough moving off of the Southeastern United States Coast is helping to churn up an area of disturbed weather northeast of The Bahamas. The National Hurricane Center has given the unorganized complex of showers and thunderstorms a 60% chance of further tropical or sub-tropical development over the next five days. What does this mean for the local area? Nothing. What does this mean for the Eastern U.S.? Perhaps some wet weather and increased surf over the Memorial Day Weekend. What does this mean for the tropical season? Very little. As we have noted previously, pre-season storms have not served as a pre-cursor to a more active season. Over a 50 year period through 2015, 14 hurricane seasons brought a total of 17 early-season depressions, storms and hurricanes. Looking at the simple numbers alone, there are no trends. April or May storms are not necessarily a pre-cursor to an active season. Actually, 7 of the 14 years finished with fewer named storms than the averages-12 named storms, 6 hurricanes and 2 major hurricanes.

--Josh

For updates, stay connected with Meteorologist Josh Eachus:

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Warm with increased humidity http://www.wbrz.com/news/warm-with-increased-humidity/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/warm-with-increased-humidity/ Weather Wed, 25 May 2016 5:55:42 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Warm with increased humidity

Rain shower development will remain limited, but not impossible, through the holiday weekend.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: A slightly better chance at pop-up showers will come this afternoon. Still, most locations are expected to stay dry. Highs will again peak in the upper 80s. Humidity will be noticed as well. Overnight lows will be around 70 degrees.

Up Next: The same forecast will go up on the board Thursday and likely Friday. Measurable rain should not be found in more than 20% of the 13 Parish, 3 County forecast area through the week. By Saturday, we’ll bring in a little better opportunity at scattered storms but even this looks unimpressive right now. Overall, Memorial Day Weekend can be summed up as warm, sticky, partly sunny and mostly dry.  

THE SCIENCE:

Forecast Discussion: The ridge that lidded the atmosphere on Monday and Tuesday will begin to compress southward into the Gulf of Mexico today. At the same time a few ripples of energy in the 500mb flow will trek across the Gulf Coast. While moisture is limited, the weaker ridge and areas of positive vorticity advection will offer slightly a slightly better opportunity for a few showers or thunderstorms to pop up over the next two afternoons—though geographical rain coverage shouldn’t exceed 20% of the forecast area either day. By Friday and Saturday, a shortwave trough will be moving out of the Midwest and getting absorbed by the mean flow. However, a trough axis lining up Louisiana may be just enough to enhance afternoon shower and thunderstorm development—albeit with coverage remaining low. On Sunday and Monday, a subtle northern push from the ridge and quieter upper levels will again make shower and storm development difficult. Temperature won’t budge much through the stretch with highs in the upper 80s and lows near 70 degrees. Humidity will slowly build through the weekend.   

 

The Tropics: While the local area will be under the influence of a shifting ridge, a deep trough in the Eastern United States could spur some tropical development off of the Southeastern U.S. Coast. Forecast models suggest that the presence of an upper level low may translate into a surface low which could then take on some tropical or sub-tropical characteristics. In fact, the National Hurricane Center has highlighted a region northeast of the Bahamas as having a 30% chance of development over the next five days. What does this mean for the local area? Nothing. What does this mean for the Eastern U.S.? Perhaps some wet weather and increased surf over the Memorial Day Weekend. What does this mean for the tropical season? Very little. As we have noted previously, pre-season storms have not served as a pre-cursor to a more active season. Over a 50 year period to 2015, 13 hurricane seasons brought a total of 16 early-season depressions, storms and hurricanes. Looking at the simple numbers alone, there are no trends. April or May storms are not necessarily a pre-cursor to an active season. Actually, 6 of the 13 years finished with fewer named storms than the averages-12 named storms, 6 hurricanes and 2 major hurricanes.

--JoshFor updates, stay connected with Meteorologist Josh Eachus:

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Quiet locally, a tropical note http://www.wbrz.com/news/quiet-locally-a-tropical-note/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/quiet-locally-a-tropical-note/ Weather Tue, 24 May 2016 6:07:08 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Quiet locally, a tropical note

A glimpse at the 7-Day forecast will have you thinking, “May.”

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: Keeping in a similar pattern, Tuesday will again bring mostly sunny skies with a high temperature in the upper 80s. A touch more humidity may be noticed—but overall, not too bad. Winds will be light and southeasterly. The overnight hours will be mostly clear with a low in the upper 60s.

Up Next: A slightly better chance at pop-up showers is expected on Wednesday as some moisture returns to the area, meaning you will feel some humidity as well. Highs will again peak in the upper 80s. Overnight lows will be around 70 degrees. The same forecast will go up on the board through Friday. Measurable rain should not be found in more than 20% of the 13 Parish, 3 County forecast area through the week. By Saturday, we’ll bring in a little better opportunity at scattered storms but even this looks unimpressive right now.

THE SCIENCE:

Forecast Discussion: After today, an upper-level ridge will back off somewhat and allow ripples of energy in the jet stream to have a better chance at sparking showers and thunderstorms—primarily during peak heating hours. Model precipitation output is almost nil through Tuesday, with only the ECMWF suggesting some minor accumulated rain on Wednesday and Thursday. Therefore, if any showers do develop, they will be insignificant. Vorticity and uplift look a little more favorable Thursday and Friday and thus slightly higher rain chances may be reflected. A shortwave trough axis will cut across the Mid-Mississippi River Valley on Saturday and this should come with a little better shot at scattered showers and thunderstorms, but again, the daytime heat will be needed to get action started. The Sunday/Monday timeframe is not very clear at this point, but no major disturbances are foreseen, therefore a washout either day is unlikely. Temperatures will be very close to normal through the period.

The Tropics: While the local area will be under the influence of a shifting ridge, a deep trough in the Eastern United States could spur some tropical development off of the Southeastern U.S. Coast. Forecast models suggest that the presence of an upper level low may translate into a surface low which could then take on some tropical characteristics. What does this mean for the local area? Next to nothing. What does this mean for the Eastern U.S.? Perhaps some wet weather and increased surf over the Memorial Day Weekend. What does this mean for the tropical season? Very little. As we have noted previously, pre-season storms have not served as a pre-cursor to a more active season. Over a 50 year period to 2015, 13 hurricane seasons brought a total of 16 early-season depressions, storms and hurricanes. Looking at the simple numbers alone, there are no trends. April or May storms are not necessarily a pre-cursor to an active season. Actually, 6 of the 13 years finished with fewer named storms than the averages-12 named storms, 6 hurricanes and 2 major hurricanes.

--Josh

For updates, stay connected with Meteorologist Josh Eachus:

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Getting into the ol' standard http://www.wbrz.com/news/getting-into-the-ol-standard/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/getting-into-the-ol-standard/ Weather Mon, 23 May 2016 6:25:38 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Getting into the ol' standard

After brief break in humidity over the weekend, more seasonable weather is expected this week. 

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: Expect skies to be mostly sunny early with increasing clouds and an isolated thunderstorm possible in the afternoon. Temperatures will be warm with more humidity-- highs in the upper 80s. Tonight, skies will be mainly clear with lows in the upper 60s.

Up Next: Afternoon showers and thunderstorms rule our pattern this week feeling more like summertime, thankfully without the 90s. We will be close though as we peak our afternoon temperatures in the upper 80s. It's quite possible a few places could squeak into the 90s briefly, especially if they go without seeing rain. A slightly better chance of showers is expected on Wednesday and Thursday, and it's possible for some slightly drier air to move in by the weekend. At the moment, it looks like we could be seeing a stormy system move through next Sunday, but it's still a little too early to confirm. 

THE SCIENCE:

Forecast Discussion: This is the time of year where the subtleties in the upper levels become much more important. A building ridge over the Gulf of Mexico and into the Southeastern U.S. will result in weaker lapse rates and little more than an isolated shower or thunderstorm through Tuesday. In addition, more solar radiation will mean slightly warmer temperatures. Southwest flow aloft though will leave just enough moisture to keep us from eliminating rain chances altogether. By midweek, a shortwave trough in the Midwest will breakdown the ridge just enough for some additional instability to be available for more scattered afternoon showers and storms through Thursday. We will be keeping an eye on a more robust wave that could affect the region closer to Memorial Day. 

--Josh

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The time is NOW http://www.wbrz.com/news/the-time-is-now/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/the-time-is-now/ Weather Fri, 20 May 2016 11:22:41 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus The time is NOW

The time to prepare for a hurricane is before the season begins, when you have the time and are not under pressure. If you wait until a hurricane is on your doorstep, the odds are that you will be under duress and will make the wrong decisions. Take the time now to write down your hurricane plan. Know where you will ride out the storm and get your supplies now. You don’t want to be standing in long lines when a hurricane warning is issued. Those supplies that you need will probably be sold out by the time you reach the front of the line. Being prepared, before a hurricane threatens, makes you resilient to the hurricane impacts of wind and water. It will mean the difference between your being a hurricane victim and a hurricane survivor.

Taking all of the preparedness steps reviewed this week could make a stressful time a little less so. While it may seem elementary, writing down your plan will ensure you don’t make mistakes when faced with an emergency—eliminating second guessing. Document all of your possessions and valuables, taking pictures to support.  Gather your most important documents, like passports and medical records and stash them somewhere safe, that you can access quickly. Involve the entire family in planning and preparedness so that everyone is on the same page. FEMA provides a template that you and your family can fill out, HERE.

Finally, remember this: you will hear pre-season forecasts every year that may call for above or below average activity. There is some skill to this and even scientific application. However there currently is no ability to predict where those storms will develop or move. Much like a skipper may predict how many pitches the opposing pitcher may throw, there is no telling if they’ll hit the strike zone. That is why we need to be ready. It only takes one.

This concludes Hurricane Preparedness Week. You will be able to get links to all of this information, on wbrz.com. All season long, check in with the WBRZ Weather Team on News 2, wbrz.com/weather, the WBRZ WX app., the WBRZ Cable Weather Channel and for the latest bulletins in the Capital City, please keep up with us on social media.

Facebook: WBRZ Weather

Twitter: @WBRZweather

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Trust your source, check your source http://www.wbrz.com/news/trust-your-source-check-your-source/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/trust-your-source-check-your-source/ Weather Fri, 20 May 2016 10:31:51 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Trust your source, check your source

Communication is crucial during hurricane season—especially when a storm threatens. Studies have shown that clear and consistent messages result in a better understanding of the forecast. For that reason, the WBRZ Weather Team and NOAA’s National Hurricane Center work in tandem to deliver official statements from the most skilled tropical forecasters in the United States.

Be wary of sources that go rogue or issue their own statements ahead of the official word from NOAA. Mixed messages from multiple sources can lead to questionable decision making. Good information sources will be consistent with one another so that you are left with no confusion about the forecast or the proper actions to take.     

The WBRZ Weather Team works with the National Weather Service to provide information regarding specific expected impacts from the storm for the local area. Emergency managers will make the decisions regarding evacuations.

The WBRZ Weather Team has invested in technology to be sure that you get an accurate and official word, the moment it is issued. We’re proud to be the only weather team in the Baton Rouge area with that capability. Here are some bulletins you may see from the WBRZ Weather Team during the tropical season:

-Tropical Outlooks are issued when an area in the tropics has a chance of further development. You should periodically check in with the WBRZ Weather Team for updates.

-Advisories are issued for depressions and named storms. These come out four times each day, at 4 and 10. To assess the progress of the system and possible impacts to the United States, you should check in frequently check in with the WBRZ Weather Team on social media for new information the moment it is released.

-Watches and Warnings are issued when storm impacts are possible or even probable. You should check in with the WBRZ Weather Team for a constant stream of information on News 2, wbrz.com, the WBRZ WX App. and social media. Begin to take action on the hurricane plan you put together before the season.   

Hurricane Preparedness Week (May 15-21) concludes tomorrow. You will be able to get links to all of this information, on wbrz.com. All season long, check in with the WBRZ Weather Team on News 2, wbrz.com/weather, the WBRZ WX app., the WBRZ Cable Weather Channel and for the latest bulletins in the Capital City, please keep up with us on social media.

Facebook: WBRZ Weather

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App. Store & Google Play: WBRZ WX


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Daylight reveals storm damage, is there more to come? http://www.wbrz.com/news/daylight-reveals-storm-damage-is-there-more-to-come-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/daylight-reveals-storm-damage-is-there-more-to-come-/ Weather Fri, 20 May 2016 6:21:47 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Daylight reveals storm damage, is there more to come?

Severe thunderstorms swept through the region Late Thursday and Early Friday taking down trees and cutting off power to thousands. For more on the impressive storm complex, known as a Mesoscale Convective System (MCS), visit WBRZ Weather on Facebook.

One final round of showers and thunderstorms may kick up today as a cold front passes through the region. Severe weather is not anticipated.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: Scattered showers and thunderstorms will linger through the first half of Friday, especially for areas south and east of Baton Rouge. However, the threat for severe weather has passed. Expect the chance for rain to diminish from northwest to southeast by mid-afternoon as a cold front slips toward the Gulf of Mexico. Some sun may even return prior to dusk--but clouds through much of the day will hold highs in the low 80s. Alas, Baseball at the Box WILL  be able to play tonight as clearing begins in the evening and continues overnight. Lows will be in the mid 60s.

Up Next: The unsettled pattern will break this weekend—bringing another nice two day stretch for outdoor activity. Of course, more afternoon sunshine will lead to warmer temperatures with highs in the upper 80s Saturday and Sunday. On the other hand, humidity will be ratcheted down a notch. A similar forecast will go up on the board for Monday.

THE SCIENCE:

Forecast Discussion: The axis of an upper level trough will move across the region today. After widespread early morning storms, showers and thunderstorms will become scattered into the late morning and early afternoon hours as an associated surface low and cold front traverse the region. Once the trough axis and front exit eastward, drier air will filter in aloft and showers should begin to wrap up with clearing expected overnight. A weak ridge will build over the region Saturday through Monday. In addition, a high pressure will be positioned over the Ohio Valley maintaining a northerly component to surface winds. The combination will bring a drier atmosphere and less humidity. Mainly clear skies with lows in the mid 60s and highs in the upper 80s will be the trend. By the middle of next week, as the ridge retreats west, cooler northwesterly winds aloft riding over top of a return flow at the surface may allow for a few marine breeze showers to spark during peak heating hours.

--Josh

For updates, stay connected with Meteorologist Josh Eachus:

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All warnings have expired, thunderstorm watch in effect for eastern part of WBRZ viewing area http://www.wbrz.com/news/all-warnings-have-expired-thunderstorm-watch-in-effect-for-eastern-part-of-wbrz-viewing-area/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/all-warnings-have-expired-thunderstorm-watch-in-effect-for-eastern-part-of-wbrz-viewing-area/ Weather Thu, 19 May 2016 10:08:53 PM Hunter Robinson All warnings have expired, thunderstorm watch in effect for eastern part of WBRZ viewing area

BATON ROUGE - All tornado and thunderstorm warnings have expired, but a severe thunderstorm watch remains in effect for the eastern part of the WBRZ viewing area.


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Fortify your castle http://www.wbrz.com/news/fortify-your-castle/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/fortify-your-castle/ Weather Thu, 19 May 2016 1:06:13 PM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Fortify your castle

If you plan to ride out the storm in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code specifications. Many of these retrofits do not cost much or take as long to do as you may think. Have the proper plywood, steel or aluminum panels to board up the windows and doors. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand the winds.

In a high wind event anything can become a dangerous flying object. Take a day to make your landscaping more hurricane resistant. Activities include replacing landscaping rocks with mulch or trimming back tree limbs hanging over your roof.

Along with strong wind, hurricanes bring heavy rains. Your gutters are there to direct this rainfall away from your home and prevent flooding. This only works if your gutters are clear and in good shape. Take the day to clear out leaves or any other debris. While you’re up there make sure you don’t have any rusted out spots, holes, or openings.

Properly installed soffits keep water out of your house, and hurricanes will bring plenty. Properly installed soffits should stay in place in most high wind events, so take the day to make sure yours will stand up to a hurricane. Suitable caulking and screws will ensure your soffits are fit for hurricane season.

You can improve your roof’s resistance to uplift, without removing any of your roof covering! Proper application of the right caulk can increase the wind uplift resistance of your plywood roof sheathing by as much as three times! This one-day activity should be started in the early morning hours as attics can become quite warm in the afternoon hours.

If a hurricane is headed your way and you do not have pre-installed hurricane shutters, you are going to want to board up with plywood shutters. To make the process easier, measure all of the windows in your home you need to protect. You will then want to get the plywood cut and labeled to make installation easier if a storm is closing in.

The above items are just a few do it yourself one-hour, one-day and one-weekend activities suggested by the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes. A more detailed list and video tutorials can be found HERE.

New topics will be discussed each day through Hurricane Preparedness Week (May 15-21) on wbrz.com. All season long, check in with the WBRZ Weather Team on News 2, wbrz.com/weather, the WBRZ WX app., the WBRZ Cable Weather Channel and for the latest bulletins in the Capital City, please keep up with us on social media.

Facebook: WBRZ Weather

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Rallying for no rain http://www.wbrz.com/news/rallying-for-no-rain/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/rallying-for-no-rain/ Weather Thu, 19 May 2016 6:10:58 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Rallying for no rain

1pm UPDATE: Radar and model trends are showing faster speeds on an area of showers and thunderstorms to the west. If the current activity holds together, rain could impact the LSU Baseball game. High resolution models show rain arriving near game time, radar is estimating showers and thunderstorms not long after that.


Fans of LSU Baseball heading to Alex Box Stadium this evening should monitor radar on their WBRZ WX App. and keep up with @WBRZweather on Twitter, but the latest information brings positive news. Widespread, heavy rain that would halt the game should be holding off until much later tonight.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: Skies will be partly sunny on Thursday with high temperatures in the mid 80s. There is the possibility of an isolated shower or thunderstorm but much of the day will be spent dry. The main batch of precipitation is expected to hold off until the overnight hours. Thus, it could be a bit noisy for sleep time. Muggy air will stop low temperatures around 70 degrees.

Up Next: Friday is still looking unsettled. A batch of showers and storms has the potential to produce downpours, amounting to an inch or two of rain and perhaps even a few strong thunderstorms. Much of the action should occur during the morning hours, though scattered showers and thunderstorms remain in the forecast through afternoon. The unsettled pattern will quiet as we move into the weekend. Of course, more afternoon sunshine will lead to warmer temperatures with highs in the upper 80s Saturday and Sunday. On the other hand, humidity will be ratcheted down a notch.

THE SCIENCE:

Forecast Discussion: With a weak front washing out over the Louisiana Gulf Coast, it will take some time for showers and thunderstorms to kick out once again. As an upper level trough moves out of the Midwest, some energy will begin to move through the local area. Positive vorticity advection and omega will contribute to new development as they arrive. While isolated showers may develop along the front, given the latest movement of the trough, much of Thursday may be spent dry and partly sunny before rain and storms arrive during the evening and overnight hours. Early Friday, a weak wave of surface low pressure and an attendant front will traverse the area as the upper trough axis moves across the region. These features will focus a batch of rain and with high precipitable water values; efficient storms could leave behind an inch or two of rain. High resolution models indicate that the heaviest and steadiest rain will occur between midnight and dawn Friday. Scattered activity will continue in the proximity of the front and trough into the afternoon before wrapping up in the evening. A mid-level ridge will boot the trough eastward while a surface high pressure system settles into the Ohio River Valley over the weekend. Northeasterly winds, drier air and sunny skies will be the result. High pressure controlling the Eastern United States weather pattern into early next week will keep the local area quiet.   

--Josh

For updates, stay connected with Meteorologist Josh Eachus:

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Gather and stash to always be ready http://www.wbrz.com/news/gather-and-stash-to-always-be-ready/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/gather-and-stash-to-always-be-ready/ Weather Wed, 18 May 2016 8:33:31 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Gather and stash to always be ready

You’re going to need supplies not just to get through the storm but for the potentially lengthy and unpleasant aftermath. You will want to plan for two situations: Remaining in your home after a disaster or evacuating to a safer location. Have enough non-perishable food, water and medicine to last each person in your family a minimum of one week. Electricity and water could be out for at least that long. You’ll need extra cash, a battery-powered radio and flashlights. Many of us have cell phones, and they all run on batteries. You’re going to need a portable, crank or solar powered USB charger.


The Federal Alliance for Safe Homes offers this disaster supply checklist:

  • Cash -- Banks and ATMs may not be open or available for extended periods
  • Water -- at least one gallon per person per day for three to seven days, plus water for pets
  • Food -- at least enough for three to seven days, including: Non-perishable packaged or canned food and juices, food for infants and the elderly, snack food, non-electric can opener, vitamins, paper plates, plastic utensils
  • Radio -- battery powered and NOAA weather radio with extra batteries
  • Blankets, pillows etc. 
  • Clothing -- seasonal, rain gear/ sturdy shoes
  • First Aid Kit -- plus medicines, prescription drugs
  • Special items -- for babies and the elderly
  • Toiletries -- hygiene items, moisture wipes, sanitizer
  • Flashlight and batteries
  • Keys
  • Toys, books, games
  • Pet care items, proper identification, immunization records, ample food and water, medicine, a carrier or cage, leash.
  • Store important documents in a fire and water proof container.
  • Insurance papers
  • Medical records
  • Bank account numbers
  • Social Security cards
  • Deeds or mortgages
  • Birth and marriage certificates
  • Stocks and bonds
  • Recent tax returns
  • Wills 


Water should be of chief importance. Stocking an emergency water supply should be one of your top priorities so you will have enough water on hand for yourself and your family. While individual needs will vary depending on age, physical condition, activity, diet and climate, a normally active person needs at least two quarts of drinking water daily. Children, nursing mothers and people who are ill need more water. Especially in South Louisiana, very hot summer temperatures can double the amount of water needed. Because you will also need water for sanitary purposes, and possibly for cooking, you should store at least one gallon of water per person per day.  Store water in thoroughly washed plastic, fiberglass, or enamel-lined containers and don't use containers that can break, such as glass bottles. Never use a container that has held toxic substances. Camping supply stores offer a variety of appropriate containers. Plastic containers, like soda bottles, are best. Seal your water containers tightly, label them and store them in a cool, dark place.

Remember to keep your kit fresh. Replace stored food and water every six months. Keep a supply of fresh batteries on hand and keep your most important up-to-date family papers in a fire and water proof container.

New topics will be discussed each day through Hurricane Preparedness Week (May 15-21) on wbrz.com. All season long, check in with the WBRZ Weather Team on News 2, wbrz.com/weather, the WBRZ WX app., the WBRZ Cable Weather Channel and for the latest bulletins in the Capital City, please keep up with us on social media.

Facebook: WBRZ Weather

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Forecast Update: fewer showers expected this afternoon http://www.wbrz.com/news/forecast-update-fewer-showers-expected-this-afternoon/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/forecast-update-fewer-showers-expected-this-afternoon/ Weather Wed, 18 May 2016 5:32:17 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Forecast Update: fewer showers expected this afternoon

Afternoon and evening outdoor activities should be able to go on as planned with only an isolated shower to dodge around midday.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: Wednesday will bring a high temperature in the mid 80s. Isolated showers are possible but much of the day will be spent dry across the area. Skies won’t necessarily be overcast, but expect more clouds than sun. The overnight hours will stay quiet with a low temperature in the upper 60s.  

Up Next: Another round of showers and thunderstorms is forecast to develop Late Thursday, perhaps after dark, and persist into Friday. This batch has the greatest potential to produce downpours, amounting to a few inches of rain, and a few stronger thunderstorms. The unsettled pattern will begin to ease as we move into the weekend. Of course, more sunshine will lead to hot temperatures with highs approaching 90 degrees Saturday and Sunday.

THE SCIENCE:Forecast Discussion: A shortwave trough positioned over the Four Corners will continue to send waves of positive vorticity advection through a west-southwest flow across the Gulf Coast. Areas of omega, or uplift, will be maximized by these waves of energy and diurnal heating with dew points in the upper 60s will contribute to the development of showers and thunderstorms as well. After a dry beginning, the next wave of energy will scoot across the region this afternoon. A few showers may spark, however a pocket of mid-level dry air may limit activity. Showers will have a difficult time developing and sustaining themselves and thus rain coverage has been trimmed back for today. The final round of rain is pegged for Late Thursday as the shortwave trough itself and an associated surface front approach the region. The most widespread and heavy batch of rain will affect the area during the Thursday Night to Friday Afternoon time period. As precipitable water values will be 200% of normal, 1-2” or rain could easily fall with locally higher amounts. This would leave a weeklong total of 2-4” of rain. By the weekend, that trough will be pulling away to the east and some drier air will filter in aloft. Rain chances are considerably lower, if not absent for Saturday.  A mid-level ridge will result in a hot and dry Sunday and that pattern will hold into early next week. A string of 90° days could go up on the boards—not uncommon for Late May. 

--Josh

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Are you covered? The answer is a call away http://www.wbrz.com/news/are-you-covered-the-answer-is-a-call-away/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/are-you-covered-the-answer-is-a-call-away/ Weather Tue, 17 May 2016 6:39:31 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Are you covered? The answer is a call away

With the many and significant threats to property posed by a tropical cyclone, call your insurance company or agent now, before the season. Ask for an insurance check-up to make sure you have enough homeowners insurance to repair or even replace your home. Don’t forget coverage for your car or boat.

Aside from surge, tide and wind impacts, widespread heavy rainfall associated with tropical cyclones may produce amounts in excess of 6 inches. This can even occur well inland and away from where the storm made landfall. Even after the storm has passed, water runoff can bulge rivers and streams elevating the flood threat days later. No matter the strength of the storm, torrential rain is a threat in every tropical cyclone. Specific amounts depend on a cyclone’s speed and size as well as the geography and geology of the area being affected. Slower, larger storms tend to generate more rainfall. The most pronounced example of inland flooding came in 2001. Tropical Storm Allison produced more than 40 inches of rain in nearby Houston, TX. Killing 41 and causing $5 billion in damage.

It is VERY IMPORTANT to remember that standard homeowners insurance DOES NOT cover flooding. Whether you’re a homeowner or renter, you’ll need a separate policy for it, and it’s available through your company, agent or the National Flood Insurance Program at www.floodsmart.gov. Make that call now as flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period.

New topics will be discussed each day through Hurricane Preparedness Week (May 15-21) on wbrz.com. All season long, check in with the WBRZ Weather Team on News 2, wbrz.com/weather, the WBRZ WX app., the WBRZ Cable Weather Channel and for the latest bulletins in the Capital City, please keep up with us on social media.

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Catching a break http://www.wbrz.com/news/catching-a-break/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/catching-a-break/ Weather Tue, 17 May 2016 12:35:08 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Catching a break

The first round and first inch of rain for the week will taper through Tuesday.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: Tuesday will bring scattered showers and thunderstorms during the morning hours—especially for areas south of I-12. While isolated showers may linger into the afternoon, there will also be room for some breaks of sunshine. Highs temperatures will run into the low 80s with light easterly winds. A drier trend into the evening should allow a full baseball game at Alex Box Stadium. Overnight, some clouds will linger with low temperatures in the upper 60s.

Up Next: Wednesday through Friday, a front will stall out over Louisiana and a very wet, repetitive pattern will commence. Rounds of rain and storms are forecast, especially each afternoon. By the end of the week, the area could collect a rain total of 3-5”. As far as temperatures go, highs will be in the low 80s with lows near 70 degrees.

THE SCIENCE:

Forecast Discussion: As a weak wave of low pressure along the Louisiana Coast begins to push eastward, a pocket of dry air aloft will slide across the forecast area on Tuesday, bringing an end to morning showers and thunderstorms. A dry period is anticipated into Early Wednesday before the next wave of upper energy and a surface front return to the region. Into Wednesday Afternoon, a cold front will move into the region, stalling in Louisiana through Friday as precipitable water values will increase and be 150-200% of normal. This will mean that any storms during the second half of the week will be very efficient rain makers and thus, the Weather Prediction Center is forecasting 3-5” across the region by the end of the week. Rounds of rain and thunderstorms will be pinned down more precisely within 24-36 hours of a given forecast period however there are some early insights right now. Areas of maximized positive vorticity advection (upper level energy) and omega (uplift) are shown Thursday Afternoon and again through much of Friday. Instability will be high enough that severe weather may have to be considered in upcoming forecasts, however upper wind fields may be somewhat limiting. The stalled front should get a boot through by the weekend allowing showers and thunderstorms to gradually break away. A ridge will move overhead on Sunday leading to drier and warmer conditions.      

--Josh

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The route and destination, have an evacuation plan http://www.wbrz.com/news/the-route-and-destination-have-an-evacuation-plan/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/the-route-and-destination-have-an-evacuation-plan/ Weather Mon, 16 May 2016 9:22:07 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus The route and destination, have an evacuation plan

Determine if whether or not you live in a storm surge hurricane evacuation zone or if you’re in a home that would be unsafe during a hurricane. If you are, figure out where you would go and how you would get there if told to evacuate. You do not need to travel hundreds of miles. Identify someone, perhaps a friend or relative who doesn’t live in a zone or unsafe home, and ask to use their home as your evacuation destination. Be sure to account for your pets, as most local shelters do not permit them. Put the plan in writing for you and those you care about. If you live outside of an evacuation zone in a safe home, offer to be the evacuation destination for others.

If you are a pet owner, your family’s disaster plan must include your pets. In the event of a disaster, if you must evacuate, the best thing you can do to protect your pets is to evacuate them too. Identify boarding facilities, veterinarians or hotels outside of the affected areas that can accept your pets. If you have notice of an impending disaster, call ahead for reservations. Pet-friendly shelters may be opened during an evacuation.

When a hurricane threatens Louisiana, a phased evacuation will be based on geographic location and time in which tropical storm winds are forecasted to reach the affected areas.

Phase I - 50 Hours before onset of tropical storm winds. This includes areas south of the Intracoastal Waterway which are outside any levee protection system and are vulnerable to Category 1 and 2 storms. These areas are depicted in RED on the Evacuation Map. During Phase I there are no route restrictions.

Phase II - 40 Hours before onset of tropical storm winds. Thus includes areas south of the Mississippi River which are levee protected but remain vulnerable to Category 2 or higher storms. These areas are depicted in ORANGE on the Evacuation Map. During Phase II there are no route restrictions.

Phase III - 30 Hours before onset of tropical storm winds. Includes areas on the East Bank of the Mississippi River in the New Orleans Metropolitan Area which are within the levee protection system but remain vulnerable to a slow-moving Category 3 or any Category 4 or 5 storm. These areas are depicted in YELLOW on the Evacuation Map. During Phase III, certain routes will be directed and the Contraflow Plan implemented.

For Louisiana’s full emergency and evacuation guide, CLICK HERE.

New topics will be discussed each day through Hurricane Preparedness Week (May 15-21) on wbrz.com. All season long, check in with the WBRZ Weather Team on News 2, wbrz.com/weather, the WBRZ WX app., the WBRZ Cable Weather Channel and for the latest bulletins in the Capital City, please keep up with us on social media.

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Stormy days to come http://www.wbrz.com/news/stormy-days-to-come/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/stormy-days-to-come/ Weather Mon, 16 May 2016 6:28:38 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Stormy days to come

Expect an unsettled weather pattern this week with increased rain chances Wednesday through Friday. A couple of inches are possible by Saturday.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: With mainly cloudy skies, temperatures won’t climb too high on your Monday Afternoon. Numbers will generally top out in the low 80s. A warm front will be lifting through the region and as a result increased humidity will be noticed—especially later in the day. The boundary will also squeeze out a few showers and storms. A washout is not expected. Overnight, clouds and spotty showers will stay in the forecast with muggier lows in the upper 60s.   

Up Next: Tuesday will offer more of a “summer-like” scenario with warmth and humidity, perhaps a few breaks of sunshine, and pop-up thundershowers. Highs will climb into the mid 80s. Wednesday through Friday, a front will stall out over Louisiana and a very wet, repetitive pattern will commence. Rounds of rain and storms are forecast each afternoon with high temperatures in the low 80s and lows near 70 degrees.

THE SCIENCE:

Forecast Discussion: A warm front lifting through the region will bring a better chance for showers and thunderstorms today. An upper level disturbance detected on the water vapor imagery in Southeastern Texas will also add a pop to precipitation development during the afternoon hours. In addition to waves of energy aloft, daily activity should be aided by daytime warmth and fluctuations in the position of the marine breeze. With the warm front displaced north, a little less action is expected Tuesday. Then on Wednesday, a cold front approaching Louisiana will become the main focus for shower and thunderstorm development. Areas of vorticity riding over that boundary will be able to force out rounds of rain and storms. With a uniform wind direction at all levels of the atmosphere, the front will not progress much Wednesday through Friday and with a thoroughly saturated air mass, thunderstorms will be able to produce heavy rain. The persistence of the pattern will perhaps raise some flood concerns by the end of the week. Early projections from the Weather Prediction Center are in the 4-6” range. There may also be a risk for severe weather as well—we’ll evaluate those conditions as we get closer.     

--Josh

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Governor Edwards names May 15 start of Hurricane Preparedness Week http://www.wbrz.com/news/governor-edwards-names-may-15-start-of-hurricane-preparedness-week/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/governor-edwards-names-may-15-start-of-hurricane-preparedness-week/ Weather Sun, 15 May 2016 6:29:14 PM Kevin Dupuy Governor Edwards names May 15 start of Hurricane Preparedness Week

BATON ROUGE – Governor John Bel Edwards proclaimed on Sunday that May 15 – 21 will be Hurricane Preparedness Week.

Edwards released a joint statement with the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness to urge residents to “get a game plan” for the upcoming hurricane season.

“Now is the time to make sure you have an emergency plan in place for you, your family, your pets and business,” Edwards said.

The 2016 hurricane season begins June 1st.

GOHSEP Director Jim Waskom said that residents should prepare emergency kits that include at least three days of supplies.

“As we have seen with past storms, each event is different and includes different challenges,” Waskom said. “The more planning you do now, the easier it will be to deal with a crisis.”

The WBRZ News 2 weather team is preparing as well for the upcoming hurricane season. Beginning Monday, the WBRZ weather team will provide daily postings with information on how you can be prepared for severe weather.

A list of hurricane supplies, evacuation information and other important information can be found at www.getagameplan.org.


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Years since last Louisiana landfall, officials say prepare for hurricanes now http://www.wbrz.com/news/years-since-last-louisiana-landfall-officials-say-prepare-for-hurricanes-now/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/years-since-last-louisiana-landfall-officials-say-prepare-for-hurricanes-now/ Weather Fri, 13 May 2016 10:16:43 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Years since last Louisiana landfall, officials say prepare for hurricanes now

On average, over a two year period, 3 hurricanes strike United States coastline with one of them being considered major. Research on tropical cyclone return periods shows that Louisiana averages a hurricane strike every 7-8 years. The last was Isaac in 2012. It’s easy to forget what a hurricane is capable of doing. The U.S. has not been directly impacted by a major hurricane (Category 3 or higher) in more than a decade. However, hurricanes such as Ike, Sandy and Isaac reminded us that significant impacts can occur without the storm being classified as “major.” Many people are suffering from hurricane amnesia in the forms of complacency, denial and inexperience. This remarkable hurricane streak is going to end, and we have to be ready for it to happen this season.

Hurricanes are not just a coastal problem. Impacts can be felt hundreds of miles inland.

Therefore, it is important to identify the types of wind and water hazards that can affect your home, and then start preparing NOW for how to handle them.


Storm surge is the water pushed ashore by a tropical cyclone. It is the deadliest hurricane hazard.

Strong winds are capable of producing significant damage to any and all structures in their path.

Inland flooding can occur far from the coast and well after landfall. Such events are a more frequent cause of death in tropical cyclones.

Tornadoes are commonly spawned by tropical cyclones, well away from the center of the storm.

Rip currents along and near the coast can be deadly, even when to storm is well offshore.


While hurricanes are classified as the most powerful tropical cyclone, tropical storms and even depressions should still be taken seriously. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) defines a tropical cyclone as a rotating, organized system of clouds and thunderstorms that originates over tropical or subtropical waters and has a closed low-level circulation. There are several classifications of tropical cyclones.


Tropical Depression: A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 38 mph (33 knots) or less.

Tropical Storm: A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph (34 to 63 knots).

Hurricane: A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher.

Major Hurricane: A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 111 mph (96 knots) or higher, corresponding to a Category 3, 4 or 5 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

A Post-Tropical Cyclone is a system that no longer possesses sufficient tropical characteristics to be considered a tropical cyclone. Post-tropical cyclones can still bring heavy rain and high winds.


Assess your vulnerability to these storms, the hazards they present, and then begin to prepare NOW. By the time a storm is named, it may be too late. History has shown that many tropical tragedies are related to a lack of hurricane awareness and preparation. This year, from May 15-21 the National Hurricane Center, the WBRZ Weather Team and hopefully you will participate in Hurricane Preparedness Week. Together, we’ll discuss how these storms may affect you and what you can do to prepare for and recover from a storm, should one strike.

New topics will be discussed each day through Hurricane Preparedness Week on wbrz.com. All season long, check in with the WBRZ Weather Team on News 2, wbrz.com/weather, the WBRZ WX app., the WBRZ Cable Weather Channel and for the latest bulletins in the Capital City, please keep up with us on social media.

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Outdoor plans look good again http://www.wbrz.com/news/outdoor-plans-look-good-again/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/outdoor-plans-look-good-again/ Weather Fri, 13 May 2016 6:05:39 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Outdoor plans look good again

On Thursday, Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport reached 91° at 2:47pm. This marked the first 90°+ day in 2016 and the first since October 16, 2015.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: Friday will begin with a few lingering showers near the coast. A weak cold front will continue to fizzle over the area through the day clearing clouds from north to south. Afternoon sun will return bringing highs back into the mid 80s with noticeably less humidity. Overnight skies will go all clear with lows in the low 60s.

Up Next: Saturday will feature mostly sunny skies with a high in the mid 80s. Humidity will remain lower than it was during the week. The nighttime hours will stay mainly clear with a low in the mid 60s. By Sunday Afternoon, a few clouds will return and there is an outside shot at an isolated shower—especially for areas north and west of Baton Rouge.          

THE SCIENCE:

Forecast Discussion: A dissipating cold front will continue slipping southward into the Gulf of Mexico through Friday. The exiting front and arrival of a surface high pressure system dropping in from Arkansas will promote a north south clearing trend. Sunshine is expected by afternoon. With a drier column of air moving into the region there should be a brief respite in humidity but larger diurnal range in temperatures. Saturday will begin near average, in the low 60s, with highs reaching for the upper 80s. A weak impulse sliding through the subtropical jet stream may try to develop an isolated shower or thunderstorm as early as Sunday but it looks as though most of the available energy will not arrive until Monday. We’ll keep an eye on this in case it has an effect on some Late Sunday outdoor plans. Forecast models are not in good agreement as to how next week will unfold. While both the GFS and ECMWF suggest some positive vorticity advection on Monday, the ECMWF has a much stronger shortwave and thus much more rain coverage—with the possibility of s few stronger storms. At this time, we’re blending the two solutions. For Tuesday, both models depict a break between systems followed by another wave on Wednesday. IN this case, there is agreement among rain and thunderstorms; however the ECMWF is MUCH wetter with an inch or two of rain being indicated. Needless to say, stick with us as the details for next week become clearer.       

--Josh

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Approaching front, few showers late http://www.wbrz.com/news/approaching-front-few-showers-late/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/approaching-front-few-showers-late/ Weather Thu, 12 May 2016 5:47:09 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Approaching front, few showers late

Rain chances will increase briefly before a dry forecast returns to the area in time for the weekend.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: Thursday will continue a similar weather pattern with a partly sunny afternoon allowing high temperatures to top out in the upper 80s. As a cold front approaches the area, it is feasible that isolated showers and thunderstorms begin to develop closer to the evening and overnight hours—especially in coastal areas and north of the interstates. Most of what will be widely scattered precipitation is indeed expected to hold off until the overnight hours.

Up Next: Friday will begin near 70 degrees with mostly cloudy skies and scattered showers. A front will continue to fizzle over the area through the day bringing an end to rain chances from north to south. It does look as though afternoon sun will return bringing highs back into the mid 80s. The weekend will feature mostly sunny afternoons with highs in the mid 80s and lows in the low 60s.          

THE SCIENCE:

Forecast Discussion: An upper level trough in the Midwest is continuing to flatten. The leftover frontal zone will be pushed southward toward the Gulf Coast as a new trough dropping out of Canada begins to deepen in the Eastern United States. With the approach of that front on Thursday Evening and Friday, isolated shower and thunderstorm development is anticipated thanks to the better forcing available. There will be plenty of warmth and moisture available at the surface but buoyancy won’t be ideal on account of shallow lapse rates resulting from the trough being displaced so far to the north. In addition, wind fields aren’t favorable for severe weather either. By the Late Friday, the front will have cleared the region or washed out and a brief period of dry air advection will allow for a temporary break in humidity and clearer skies. While the weekend is expected to be dry, return flow will kick back into gear next week and another frontal zone to the north should begin to provide a focus for isolated convection each afternoon.  

--Josh

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