WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Weather Weather en-us Copyright 2014, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Wed, 22 Oct 2014 09:10:31 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Tranquil, Unchanging http://www.wbrz.com/news/tranquil-unchanging/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/tranquil-unchanging/ Weather Tue, 21 Oct 2014 4:16:01 AM Keller Watts Tranquil, Unchanging

Tranquil, unchanging

Little change can be expected in the weather over the next several days.

Forecast Discussion: A weak cold front will cross the Gulf South Tuesday Night. This system has virtually no moisture in place that would aid in the development of any showers or even a thick cloud deck for that matter. Once this front seeps into the Gulf, a reinforcing cool and dry northerly breeze will take hold for the remainder of the week. Expect slightly below average highs and lows through Saturday as a broad high pressure system in the Mid-Atlantic maintains tranquility into the weekend.

Today and Tonight: Like Monday, expect high temperatures to top out in the low 80s beneath a mainly sunny sky. The nighttime hours will be clear and just a touch less cool with lows in the mid to upper 0s.

Looking Ahead: Beyond a minor cold front on Wednesday, highs will be in the upper 70s with lows in the lower 50s for the rest of the week. Abundant afternoon sunshine will be carried into the weekend. Humidity will remain low.

The Tropics: From the National Hurricane Center

Showers and thunderstorms associated with an area of low pressurelocated over the southwestern Bay of Campeche are currently limited. This system still has the potential to become a tropical cyclone during the next couple of days while it moves slowly eastward across
the southern Bay of Campeche. Later in the week, the low is forecastto interact and possibly merge with a frontal system over thesoutheastern Gulf of Mexico or northwestern Caribbean Sea. An AirForce Reserve reconnaissance aircraft is scheduled to investigate
the disturbance this afternoon, if necessary. Interests in theYucatan Peninsula should monitor the progress of this system.

--Keller

 


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Tranquil days ahead http://www.wbrz.com/news/tranquil-days-ahead/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/tranquil-days-ahead/ Weather Mon, 20 Oct 2014 4:14:51 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Tranquil days ahead

Another week of quiet weather is ahead.

Look for plenty of sunshine and just a few passing clouds while temperatures head for the 80° mark. Overnight will be clear and quiet with lows dipping into the mid-50s.

Checking the tropics, there is an area of shower and thunderstorm activity in the Bay of Campeche that remains disorganized as of Monday Morning. With lower water temperatures and a harsher environment overall, this system is only given a 30% chance of development over the next 5 days as it drifts east-northeast. A frontal boundary falling into the Gulf should shunt the system to the east and away from Louisiana through this week.

Get a more detailed forecast in our weather blog right here: http://www.wbrz.com/weather-blog/ or from Meteorologist Josh Eachus on Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.


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Still dry, but a bit warmer http://www.wbrz.com/news/still-dry-but-a-bit-warmer/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/still-dry-but-a-bit-warmer/ Weather Fri, 17 Oct 2014 4:08:59 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III Still dry, but a bit warmer

While warmth will be on the rise, humidity will remain well below oppressive levels.

Forecast Discussion: The surface high pressure that has brought about tranquil weather over the last several days will chug toward the Florida Coast today. Resulting will be a bit of a southerly component to the local winds and thermometers will respond with the warmest day expected over the next several. By Saturday Morning, a cold front will be approaching from the north. This weak front will not have much moisture to tap into and thus rain showers are not expected, rather just an uptick in cloud coverage. On the other side of the front, Sunday through Wednesday, the region will experience dry and temperate weather.

Today and Tonight: Today we can expect to post our warmest high temperature over the next several days. Thermometers will top out around 85° with plenty of afternoon sunshine. Overnight lows will also be at their highest for the week ahead, dropping to only the lower 60s. Skies may reveal a passing cloud or two.

The Weekend: Partly sunny skies will be observed Saturday as a dry cold front works through the region. Temperatures will be similar to Friday but perhaps a touch lower due to added clouds and a northerly shifting breeze. Sunday will be mostly sunny and likely the cooler of the two days. Overall though, little sensible change is expected in the weather right into the middle of next week.

The Tropics: Hurricane Gonzalo is a category 4 storm about to bring a lot of rain and wind to Bermuda. Luckily for us, it is staying well away from the continental United States. It is picking up speed as it is being picked up by an upper level trough off the east coast. It will quickly move toward the NE and potentially scrape by Newfoundland as a tropical storm. The last time we saw a major hurricane make landfall in the US, was in 2005 with Wilma, 9 years ago this month.

 

On Facebook: Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III

On Twitter: @RG3wbrz

 

--RG3

 


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Warming, Gonzalo becomes major storm http://www.wbrz.com/news/warming-gonzalo-becomes-major-storm/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/warming-gonzalo-becomes-major-storm/ Weather Thu, 16 Oct 2014 3:48:28 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Warming, Gonzalo becomes major storm

After a cool morning, temperatures will begin returning to average.

If you wear a jacket during the chilly morning hours, you will be able to shed it by the afternoon as sunshine will move thermometers into the lower 80s. The overnight hours will be clear but not quite as cool with a low temperature in the upper 50s.

Hurricane Gonzalo is the Atlantic Basin's first major hurricane since Ophelia and Katia in 2011. A powerful storm, as of 4am CDT Thursday, Gonzalo packed winds of 140mph and a minimum central pressure of 945mb. Hurricane warnings are posted for Bermuda as Gonzalo lumbers northward around 10mph towards the island. Beyond impacts to Bermuda on Friday, the storm will accelerate to the north-northeast and out to sea.


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Another tranquil day http://www.wbrz.com/news/another-tranquil-day/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/another-tranquil-day/ Weather Wed, 15 Oct 2014 4:00:39 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Another tranquil day

The Baton Rouge area will notch another cooler than average day. After needing a light jacket early, the afternoon will warm into the middle 70s under plenty of sunshine.

Overnight will be cool and peaceful with lows again stretching for the upper 40s.

Hurricane Gonzalo continues to strengthen in the Central Atlantic Ocean. As of 4am Wednesday, Gonzalo was located about 660 miles south-southwest of Bermuda. Maximum sustained winds were 125mph with a minimum central pressure of 954mb. The storm may briefly strengthen to category four status as it turns to the north and then eventually accelerates by week's end. Hurricane force conditions will be possible over Bermuda on Friday, before the system meets its demise in the Northern Atlantic.

You can get forecasts from Meteorologist Josh Eachus weekdays on 2une-In from 5-7am and News 2 at Noon from 12-1pm. Additionally, you can get the fastest and latest forecasts and weather news by checking in with wbrz.com/weather, connecting with Josh on Google+ and following him on Twitter.


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Hurricane Gonzalo major storm, aims for Bermuda http://www.wbrz.com/news/hurricane-gonzalo-major-storm-aims-for-bermuda/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/hurricane-gonzalo-major-storm-aims-for-bermuda/ Weather Tue, 14 Oct 2014 2:05:53 PM APNewsNow Hurricane Gonzalo major storm, aims for Bermuda

MIAMI - Forecasters say Gonzalo has blown into a major hurricane in the Caribbean, churning up heavy surf as it approaches Bermuda.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami says Gonzalo is a Category 3 hurricane on with top sustained winds of 115 mph (185 kph) as it moved away from the U.S. and British Virgin Islands Tuesday.

Still intensifying, Gonzalo was centered about 770 miles (1,240 kilometers) south of Bermuda and moving northwest at 13 mph (20 kph).

The storm was expected to take a north-northwest turn late Wednesday and move over open waters toward Bermuda through Friday.


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Unsaturated http://www.wbrz.com/news/unsaturated/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/unsaturated/ Weather Tue, 14 Oct 2014 4:18:16 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Unsaturated

After spending seven straight days with above average temperatures, including a trio of 90° afternoons, Southeast Louisiana and Southern Mississippi return to more fall-like weather.

Evidence of the cooler, drier air can be found by looking at the low temperature trend over the next five days. Many locations will sneak into the upper 40s on Wednesday and Thursday Mornings.

As for the lower humidity, once again the dew point temperature can be applied to explain. When skies are clear and winds are calm, air temperatures will have a tendency to cool as much as possible. Thermometers can only cool to the temperature at which the air becomes saturated-which is the dew point temperature. Therefore, when forecast lows are in the upper 40s and lower 50s, dew points must be similar or even lower. Recalling the same dew point scale used to describe summer humidity, such readings in the 40s constitute a very dry air mass and a much more comfortable feel outside.

For Tuesday, abundant sunshine is anticipated during the afternoon hours. After a much cooler morning, a much cooler afternoon is ahead as well with highs staying 5-10° below average-in the mid-70s. A crisp morning is in the cards for Wednesday with dawn thermometers near 50° and some upper 40s likely in typical cool spots north of Baton Rouge.

The extended forecast will keep the region dry and below average before a little moderation in thermometers by Thursday Afternoon.

Even as temperatures try and climb above average by the weekend, humidity will not return to an oppressive level.

You can get forecasts from Meteorologist Josh Eachus weekdays on 2une-In from 5-7am and News 2 at Noon from 12-1pm. Additionally, you can get the fastest and latest forecasts and weather news by checking in with wbrz.com/weather, connecting with Josh on Google+ and following him on Twitter.


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Hurricane Gonzalo forms in Caribbean http://www.wbrz.com/news/hurricane-gonzalo-forms-in-caribbean/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/hurricane-gonzalo-forms-in-caribbean/ Weather Mon, 13 Oct 2014 2:00:46 PM APNewsNow Hurricane Gonzalo forms in Caribbean

MIAMI - Forecasters say Hurricane Gonzalo has formed in the eastern Caribbean and its winds are buffeting the island of Antigua, downing trees, knocking out power and tearing roofs from homes.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida, said Monday afternoon that Gonzalo is packing sustained winds of 75 mph (120 kph). Some strengthening is likely.

The storm gained strength as it passed through the Leeward Islands on a track toward the U.S. and British Virgin Islands and to the east of Puerto Rico, now as a hurricane.

As of 5 p.m. EDT (1700 GMT), the center of Gonzalo was about 20 miles (30 kilometers) southeast of St. Martin and 140 miles (230 kilometers) east-southeast of St. Thomas. It is moving toward the northwest at 12 mph (19 kmh).


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Strong storms possible Monday http://www.wbrz.com/news/strong-storms-possible-monday/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/strong-storms-possible-monday/ Weather Mon, 13 Oct 2014 6:10:45 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Strong storms possible Monday

The National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center has highlighted the entire WBRZ viewing area under an enhanced risk for severe weather on Monday.

The storm threat will be two-pronged.

Thunderstorms are expected to develop as early as midday. From noon until 5pm, isolated to scattered showers and thunderstorms can be expected through the region. At first, the more isolated storm cells will pulse up and pass over the region. Some of these storms could potentially produce a tornado. While not a certainty, far more ingredients are available to generate tornado producing storms today compared to normal. However, the afternoon hours are also a time in which some locations may even remain rain free due to the scattered nature of thunderstorms.

After 5pm, a squall line ahead of an approaching cold front will enter the region bringing rain to all. The squall line will create a much more widespread threat for damaging wind gusts. Some of these storms may also produce heavy downpours with an isolated pocket of hail.

By midnight, showers and thunderstorms will be coming to a close from west to east.

Know the difference between a watch and a warning. If a watch is issued, that means conditions are favorable for the development of a particular hazard. If a warning is issued, that means a particular hazard is imminent or occurring and action should be taken.

Be sure you have a means of staying connected to the forecast-especially as hazardous weather threatens. The WBRZ Weather Team will provide updates on-air, online and on social media:

Twitter: @2StormView, @Josh_Eachus, @RG3WBRZ, @Pat_Shingleton

Facebook: WBRZ Weather, Meteorologist Josh Eachus, Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III


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Fay hits Bermuda, becomes hurricane in open waters http://www.wbrz.com/news/fay-hits-bermuda-becomes-hurricane-in-open-waters/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/fay-hits-bermuda-becomes-hurricane-in-open-waters/ Weather Sun, 12 Oct 2014 3:11:34 PM DAVID McFADDEN Fay hits Bermuda, becomes hurricane in open waters

KINGSTON, Jamaica - Fay toppled utility poles and knocked out power to thousands of people in Bermuda before moving out over open ocean and strengthening into a hurricane.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami said Sunday that Fay was not expected to maintain its hurricane status for long. It had maximum sustained winds of 75 mph (121 kph), just above the threshold for a hurricane.

Farther south, a new storm is racing toward the eastern rim of the Caribbean, threatening to become a hurricane. Tropical Storm Gonzalo has winds of 45 mph (72 kph) and is moving toward Puerto Rico.

After tracking across the U.S. Caribbean territory of about 3.6 million people, forecasters expect Gonzalo to curve over the open Atlantic and stay away from the U.S. East Coast.


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Just keep swimming through the humidity http://www.wbrz.com/news/just-keep-swimming-through-the-humidity/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/just-keep-swimming-through-the-humidity/ Weather Fri, 10 Oct 2014 3:58:15 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III Just keep swimming through the humidity

It hasn't changed too much this week as we've kept a summer-like feel. An area of high pressure in the eastern Gulf of Mexico is helping to keep the warm and humid conditions in the forecast. Although the chance of showers aren't impossible, rain coverage will be fairly low over the next couple days. Perhaps a better chance of showers exists on Sunday, then by Monday we'll see a cold front come through and that could bring us a few strong storms.

Today, the patchy morning fog should clear by the later morning hours, and we will warm to the upper 80s. Some of us will likely even reach 90. Our "feels like" temperatures will definitely be above 90. Most showers will remain coastal with a few potentially moving inland. Most of us should stay dry. We'll cool down to 70 degrees with fog again in the morning. No more 60s for a couple days.

Monday night, that cold front should help relieve us a bit and bring us that "fall feel". It could spin up some strong thunderstorms, then cool us down and dry us out. Until then, expect some morning fog, warm and muggy days with low rain chances.

 

On Facebook: Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III

On Twitter: @RG3wbrz

 

~RG3

 

 


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Deja vu http://www.wbrz.com/news/deja-vu/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/deja-vu/ Weather Thu, 9 Oct 2014 4:05:54 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III Deja vu

Similar story as yesterday, as well as through the weekend. An area of high pressure off the east coast of Florida is helping keep the warm and humid conditions in the forecast. Although not impossible, rain chances are fairly low over the next few days. Perhaps a better chance of showers exists through the weekend as a weak front pushes through the South, but not quite through to us. It could spin up a few showers though.

Today, the morning fog should clear by the later morning hours, and we will warm up to the upper 80s, with a few coastal showers potentially moving inland. Most of us should stay dry. We'll cool down to 69 degrees with fog again in the morning.

Monday night, we're expecting another cold front to come through and this should help relieve us a bit. It could spin up some strong thunderstorms, then cool us down and dry us out. Until then, expect some morning fog, warm and muggy days with low rain chances.

 

On Facebook: Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III

On Twitter: @RG3wbrz

 

~RG3

 


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Typical, or maybe Indian http://www.wbrz.com/news/typical-or-maybe-indian/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/typical-or-maybe-indian/ Weather Wed, 8 Oct 2014 7:26:07 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Typical, or maybe Indian

Last weekend a refreshing cold front pushed through the region. Now the area is again stuck with warm and sticky conditions. Viewer Edwin Durabb of Baton Rouge emailed the WBRZ Weather Team asking if this is this a typical October in South Louisiana or perhaps an "Indian Summer?"

In case you haven't heard the term before, an "Indian Summer" is generally associated with an extended period of above normal temperatures in the fall or winter accompanied by dry, hazy conditions ushered in by a southerly breeze. Such conditions would precisely describe the Louisiana weather forecast for this entire first full week of October. Furthermore, climatological standards for this time of year are in the lower 80s and lower 60s for the Baton Rouge area. But, this does not qualify as an "Indian Summer." Why not?

Meteorologically speaking, the local of weather of late is not that uncommon. Record highs for Early October are as warm as the mid-90s. In addition, 90+ degree days have been recorded as late as the end of October.

Next, many historical references make note of the aforementioned conditions of an "Indian Summer" occurring after a killing frost or freeze. In other references, only northern sections of the country are counted for having "Indian Summers" as a discernable winter there is surely looming. Some southern locations, such as the Gulf Coast, rarely ever spend extended periods below freezing and warm spells are very common in the winter months.

As for the typical "Indian Summer" setup, the National Weather Service in Detroit, Michigan paints this picture: "...a large area of high pressure along or just off the East Coast. Occasionally, it will be this same high pressure that produced the frost/freeze conditions only a few nights before, as it moved out of Canada across the Plains, Midwest and Great Lakes and then finally, to the East Coast. Much warmer temperatures, from the Deep South and Southwest, are then pulled north on southerly breezes resulting from the clockwise rotation of wind around the high pressure. It is characteristic for these conditions to last for at least a few days to well over a week and there may be several cases before winter sets in. Such a mild spell is usually broken when a strong low pressure system and attending cold front pushes across the region. This dramatic change results from a sharp shift in the upper winds or "jet stream" from the south or southwest to northwest or north."

As for the origin of the term? Some say it has to do with the preferred hunting or harvesting season Native Americans prior to a long, harsh winter. Others contend it had to do with the prime loading times for cargo ships crossing the Indian Ocean. A few even believe the term has religious roots.

While historians may search endlessly for the precise origin of the term, note that this stale, steamy pattern is no "Indian Summer," just a typical October in South Louisiana.

You can get forecasts from Meteorologist Josh Eachus weekdays on 2une-In from 5-7am and News 2 at Noon from 12-1pm. Additionally, you can get the fastest and latest forecasts and weather news by checking in with wbrz.com/weather, connecting with Josh on Google+ and following him on Twitter.

 


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Mind over motherboard http://www.wbrz.com/news/mind-over-motherboard/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/mind-over-motherboard/ Weather Tue, 7 Oct 2014 6:53:01 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Mind over motherboard

A non-thunderstorm event in Southeastern Louisiana on Monday served as a prime example of why meteorologists cannot only rely on the often publicized "computer forecast models."

In the pre-dawn hours of Monday, October 6 (12z), a squall line of nasty thunderstorms flared up ahead of a weak cold front draped across the Lower Midwest (Fig. A). Several reports of hail and wind damage were taken from multiple locations in Eastern Texas (Fig. B). Some 240 miles from the forecast area, a first glance at radar would have us double-checking the early call of a mostly dry afternoon with only isolated showers. But, after a weekend cold front, unseasonably cool and dry air remained in place in the upper levels and the decision was made to maintain a mainly dry forecast as any thunderstorms encountering this air mass would tend to weaken and dissipate quickly.

By 9am (15z), the storm complex was holding its own (Fig. C), still producing severe thunderstorms crossing the Texas/Louisiana border and advancing southeastward. An ongoing trend through the morning, often reliable high-resolution rapid update radar simulations were continuing to depict the line of storms rumbling through the Baton Rouge Metropolitan area before falling apart (Figs. D, E). In sports terms, this was gut-check time for meteorologists. Admit defeat, save some face and take to social media changing the dry afternoon forecast to include possibly strong thunderstorms (a big bust), or stay the course and maintain the belief that, less than one hundred miles away, an impressive line of thunderstorms would suddenly vanish? In a case of good timing for this decision making process, 9am meant a crucial piece of daily information, one taught early in most collegiate meteorology courses, was just being released. The morning balloon sounding was ‘hot off the presses' and would confirm the morning assertions of a dry mid and upper level atmosphere over Southeast Louisiana (Fig. F). Notice the deep pockets of dry air circled on the sounding. Via the multi-agency conference feature, NWS Chat, National Weather Service forecasters confirmed this belief. While some regional forecasters would lunge towards the crafty models, we elected to side with the text books in hopes that everything this science had uncovered through years of research wasn't succumbing to the automation of weather analysis.

A nail-biting three hours later, the noon radar (Fig. G) (18z) image showed the line of thunderstorms weakening and being shunted away from Southeast Louisiana upon encountering the extremely dry local air mass. By day's end, Southeast Louisiana enjoyed the mostly dry day originally expected (Fig. H) and the moxie of modern forecast models had been stifled at least for one day by wily veteran text books and old-school analysis. Mind indeed prevailed over motherboard.

In our social media age, any amateur forecasters can glance at a model and mock-up a forecast. As evidenced on Monday, and fortunately for the degreed few, meteorological intuition and forecasting skill and experience still go a long way.

You can get forecasts from Meteorologist Josh Eachus weekdays on 2une-In from 5-7am and News 2 at Noon from 12-1pm. Additionally, you can get the fastest and latest forecasts and weather news by checking in with wbrz.com/weather, connecting with Josh on Google+ and following him on Twitter.


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Close call on afternoon storms http://www.wbrz.com/news/close-call-on-afternoon-storms/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/close-call-on-afternoon-storms/ Weather Mon, 6 Oct 2014 6:19:46 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Close call on afternoon storms

An ongoing complex of showers and thunderstorms in the Arklatex Region diving southward is expected to weaken as it approaches the local area this afternoon. Skies will be sunny early with some cloud development by lunch time. With the afternoon hours may come isolated shower and thunderstorm activity. High temperatures will go slightly above what was felt on Sunday, making it to the mid 80s by early afternoon. A spotty shower mention is maintained overnight as a warm front drifts through the region. Expect muggier conditions with lows staying in the middle 60s.

From Meteorologist Josh Eachus: I expect an impressive complex of thunderstorms in Northeastern Texas to weaken as it approaches the Baton Rouge area later today. Here is why:

See the bottom right picture in the attached image. That is a vertical profile of the local atmosphere. The more separation that exists between the red line (temperature) and the green line (dew point), the drier the air is. With moisture being a key ingredient to support showers and storms, our local atmosphere today is pretty limited in that regard.

Therefore, I believe Southeast Louisiana will only experience the residual spotty showers and a few thunderstorms-- NOT the strong complex seen on radar Monday Morning. The High Resolution Futurecast shows a little better chance for organized storms in South Mississippi, but this is a prime example of why computer models cannot be solely relied upon to make a forecast.


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What makes a storm severe? http://www.wbrz.com/news/what-makes-a-storm-severe-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/what-makes-a-storm-severe-/ Weather Fri, 3 Oct 2014 10:31:40 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III What makes a storm severe?

Early this morning, after the severe thunderstorm watch was canceled, many people continued to ask me if I was certain because it was still raining heavily. "You sure about that? It's a bit wild out here," said one viewer.


Even if it is raining cats and dogs in your backyard, that doesn't necessarily mean the storm qualifies as "severe," according to the National Weather Service. There is very specific criteria necessary to deem a storm as severe and thus require a warning. Here are the criteria:

Severe Thunderstorm Warning

1.Hail of 1 inch diameter or larger (about the size of a quarter)
2.Winds gusts of 58 mph or greater (it's an even 50 kts)

Tornado Warning

1.A tornado

These products are issued when they are indicated by Doppler radar, or when storm spotters report them to the National Weather Service. Storm spotters become an essential asset during episodes of severe weather because the National Weather Service can verify what they are seeing on radar. Even you can become a storm spotter. There are classes held often by the local National Weather Service office in Slidell at various locations across southeast Louisiana and south Mississippi. You can even take online courses. For more information, click here.


We are used to seeing thunderstorms every day. Sometimes they are loaded with lightning or they produce heavy rain. With lightning, you know it only takes one, no matter the storm. A flash flood watch or warning applies for heavy rain and will be issued if necessary. When it comes to a severe thunderstorm warning, large hail and strong winds will make a thunderstorm a "severe" thunderstorm. These are all designed for you to take action when necessary.

 

On Facebook: Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III

On Twitter: @RG3wbrz

 

~RG3


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Meteorological panacea http://www.wbrz.com/news/meteorological-panacea/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/meteorological-panacea/ Weather Fri, 3 Oct 2014 12:56:09 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III Meteorological panacea

As you wake up this morning, you will hear some claps of thunder as well as me potentially blowing up your Twitter feed (We recommend Twitter for the latest updates when we are not on the air). As the end of the hurricane season looms, we are at the beginning of the severe storm season with the passage of cold fronts. These typically spin up some nasty weather from time to time.

We are currently under a slight risk for severe weather, with the main threat being hail and gusty winds more than anything. We are also under a severe thunder storm watch until 5:00am. Expect a good hour of heavy rainfall and some intense lightning. As the line of showers and thunderstorms push through the area we can expect some clearing closer to lunchtime. Temperatures will reach the lower 80s for the high, but a dry 80 degrees. Expect mostly sunny skies for the rest of the day and then cooling down fairly rapidly into the 50s overnight with clear skies.

As we bust through this line of storms, the other side will be bliss, and make way for a fantastic weekend. The forecast looks fantastic with even cooler conditions by Saturday and Sunday. No rain is expected.

 

On Facebook: Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III

On Twitter: @RG3wbrz

 

~RG3

 

 


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Overnight: Severe Thunderstorm Watch http://www.wbrz.com/news/overnight-severe-thunderstorm-watch/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/overnight-severe-thunderstorm-watch/ Weather Thu, 2 Oct 2014 9:56:20 PM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Overnight: Severe Thunderstorm Watch

The National Weather Service has issued a SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WATCH for a portion of the WBRZ viewing area until 5am Friday. This includes the Parishes of East Baton Rouge, Ascension, Assumption, East Feliciana, Iberville, Livingston, Pointe Coupee, St. Helena, St. Mary, West Baton Rouge and West Feliciana in Louisiana and the Counties of Amite, Pike and Wilkinson in Mississippi.

A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WATCH means conditions are favorable for thunderstorms to produce winds of 58 mph or higher and/or hail 1 inch in diameter or larger in addition to heavy downpours and dangerous lightning. Severe thunderstorms can occasionally even produce tornadoes. Those in and around the watch area should monitor weather information closely for possible warnings.

As a cold front continues advancing towards the region, a strong line of thunderstorms out ahead of it continues to produce gusty winds, heavy downpours and frequent lightning in Western Louisiana. With a very humid and unstable air mass in place out ahead of this line, it will be possible for the thunderstorms to maintain strength while moving through the local area.

Thunderstorms will rumble by Southeastern Louisiana and Southern Mississippi between 3am and 8am. The WBRZ Weather Team does expect some weakening of the thunderstorm line by the time it reaches the city of Baton Rouge and points to the east.

Continue to stay updated through Friday Morning and get additional information, including any warnings issued, by following our weather team on Twitter: @2stormview, @Josh_Eachus and @RG3WBRZ.


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A California hurricane? http://www.wbrz.com/news/a-california-hurricane-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/a-california-hurricane-/ Weather Thu, 2 Oct 2014 9:19:17 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III A California hurricane?

The Atlantic and Gulf Coast are infamous for tropical systems, but there are five more states with coastline. The Pacific is definitely an active area for storms. Most hit Mexico while others go out to sea and become "fish storms." We've seen a few storms threaten Hawaii in recent years as it sits near the center of the Pacific Ocean, but what about our Pacific coast, north of Mexico? Any tropical system is usually torn apart by the time it reaches the northern latitudes, so don't expect a hurricane any time soon in Alaska, Washington, or Oregon. With hundreds of miles of coastline running north to south and bordering Mexico, have there ever been storms with enough vigor to make their way into California? It's been a while, but 156 years ago today in 1858, San Diego saw their share of something prepared for every year along the Gulf and Atlantic coasts.

California usually sees leftovers of Mexican tropical systems which usually bring heavy rain and flooding to areas in the southwest California even experienced the deadly 1939 Long Beach tropical storm, but the San Diego Hurricane of 1858 is the only recorded hurricane to strike the west coast of the contiguous United States.

Military weather observations as well as newspaper accounts from California illustrate rapidly dropping pressure, heavy rain, winds, and flooding. The area, sparsely populated at the time, sustained considerable damage. However, if the same storm were to strike the area today, it is estimated that it would bring with it around $500 million in damage.

When compared to normal observations for the area, the recorded pressure and rain observations are quite impressive. The official lowest pressure observation for the storm is recorded as 994mb and sustaining winds just over official hurricane strength of 74mph. When compared to other records in this area throughout San Diego's history, it's difficult if not impossible to find comparable or stronger readings. The storm likely had just enough forward speed over just warm enough waters to hold together as it inundated San Diego.

The threat does certainly exist for a hurricane in southern California, but a lot of atmospheric variables have to be just right for a storm to survive long enough and steer into SoCal. Although a hurricane may not be the best of scenarios, I'm sure any rain for the Golden State would be much welcomed this year.

 


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Hold on, for one more day http://www.wbrz.com/news/hold-on-for-one-more-day/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/hold-on-for-one-more-day/ Weather Thu, 2 Oct 2014 3:58:48 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III Hold on, for one more day

Today's weather will be similar to yesterday with fewer morning showers. We are still watching a few spotty showers though this morning. As we approach noon, we will see a little clearing, then you can expect some more scattered showers to pop up again in the afternoon.


It's definitely a humid and warm day. Temperatures will reach the upper 80s today with southerly winds and a low near 74. As we approach the evening, the storms should settle, then during 2une in tomorrow, we will likely be dealing with a few strong storms associated with that cold front. The cold front is forecasted to pass through the area around 2une-in. It will be pleasant tomorrow, but our coolest temperatures will be felt this weekend. You can expect highs in the 70's (our low temperatures this morning) and lows in the 50s! An area of high pressure will keep rain chances away this weekend.

Friday night football should be fantastic, but a little chillier when compared to other Fridays thus far so you may want to bring a jacket or sweatshirt. If you're headed to Auburn, your forecast looks great, but cooler than Baton Rouge reaching the 40's for your low and a high of 70.

In the words of Wilson Phillips, just hold on, for one more day. The heat, humidity, and rain will be out of the way soon enough.

 

On Facebook: Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III

On Twitter: @RG3wbrz

 

~RG3

 

 


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