WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Weather Weather en-us Copyright 2014, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Fri, 22 Aug 2014 23:08:45 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 New weather products for more accurate forecasting and analysis http://www.wbrz.com/news/new-weather-products-for-more-accurate-forecasting-and-analysis/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/new-weather-products-for-more-accurate-forecasting-and-analysis/ Weather Fri, 22 Aug 2014 8:17:51 AM WBRZ Weather Team New weather products for more accurate forecasting and analysis

In an effort to bring you the most accurate and reliable forecasts, the WBRZ Weather Team has acquired new features with our already "state-of-the-art" weather graphics system.


You have seen our Futurecast, which is an interpretation of the Rapid Precision Mesoscale model, or "RPM." The purpose of this model is to present a 24 hour forecast with updates every three hours. It is a fairly reliable depiction of where and when we can expect rainfall.


We now have access to another model in our graphics system, the High Resolution Rapid Refresh model, or "HRRR." This high resolution model is updated hourly, and gives us a better idea of when we can expect to see thunderstorms pop up around the area, over the next 12 hours.
These two models will give us the option to show you what we believe is the best scenario, whether it's one model's forecast, the other's, or both. It allows us to give you the most updated and accurate forecast possible.

Other features we have incorporated are storm surge mapping graphics, as well as "dual-polarization" radar products. During severe weather, these radar products will enable us to observe hail more easily, as well as pick up signature radar features such as the infamous "debris balls" in relation to tornadoes.


We thank you for trusting the WBRZ Weather team with your weather forecast needs as we strive to bring you the best and the most accurate.


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Hottest weekend of the year? http://www.wbrz.com/news/hottest-weekend-of-the-year-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/hottest-weekend-of-the-year-/ Weather Fri, 22 Aug 2014 7:39:06 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III Hottest weekend of the year?

Relatively speaking, we've been on the cool side this year, but with temperatures reaching the upper 90s, we are looking at the hottest weekend of the year thus far. August is typically the hottest month in Louisiana.

An area of high pressure parked right over us will be keeping rain chances low, while raising temperatures and pumping in that extra moisture. That will make it feel a lot hotter than it actually is; more like 105 if not hotter. If you're lucky enough to catch a stray shower, then things should feel more pleasant.

Overall, shower chances are low, but not impossible. About 10% of the area should see showers today and through the weekend. Once that ridge begins to break down, our rain chances should rise as our temperatures fall into the lower 90s.

TROPICS

Watching Invest 96L, an a hurricane hunter aircraft is still scheduled to fly this afternoon. While is is a tad bit more organized, it is still fairly disorganized all together. Most models are now taking it out to sea, or at least the East Coast. Gulf entry can't be 100% ruled out, but most models agree that an upper level trough will help carry this away from the US. Little development is expected over the next few days. We could see it turn into a depression this weekend, but it still has some terrain to move over, and the high Cordillera Central mountains of Hispaniola. I'll be with you throughout the weekend with the latest updates.

On Facebook: Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III

On Twitter: @RG3wbrz

~RG3

 


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Warmth and Invest 96L http://www.wbrz.com/news/warmth-and-invest-96l/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/warmth-and-invest-96l/ Weather Thu, 21 Aug 2014 3:37:26 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Warmth and Invest 96L

Early sunshine will promote a rapid warmup into the mid-90s. By afternoon we should see a few cumulus clouds as thermometers chug into the upper 90s. The high temperatures combined with oppressive humidity will make the body sense over 100° outside for many hours this afternoon. Isolated showers and thunderstorms may once again pop up during the afternoon hours.

Overnight will be quiet but sticky with lows in the mid-70s.

We continue to watch a disorganized cluster of showers and thunderstorms east of the Lesser Antilles-Invest96L. The National Hurricane Center forecasts a 70% chance of development for this system over the next 5 days. The area of low pressure has many obstacles to overcome including a path over many mountainous islands and some dry air aloft. Should it survive that, over the next week or so it could move in South Atlantic or Caribbean Sea waters more conducive for development. While erratic and unreliable with a storm not even formed yet, forecast models have taken a much more northern and eastern track with this system. As of now, the southern and western most model still keeps this system east of Florida.

More than a week out, there is very little skill in forecast models-especially with tropical systems, however anything in the tropics warrants attention as we enter the peak of hurricane season. As always, stay prepared.


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Don't buy the hype, steal the truth http://www.wbrz.com/news/don-t-buy-the-hype-steal-the-truth/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/don-t-buy-the-hype-steal-the-truth/ Weather Wed, 20 Aug 2014 8:48:49 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Don't buy the hype, steal the truth

It is inescapable; a few times each year, significant weather systems affect the United States. More frequently, long-term forecast models hint at the possibility of a serious weather event and nothing ever materializes. And intolerably too often, long-term weather modeling gets into the wrong hands and becomes a "hype-cast."

Tuesday Afternoon, the GFS, an American computer weather model, placed a tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico late next week. As the Atlantic Basin rounds the bend into peak hurricane season, any such depiction bears watching. Forecast models like the GFS run 2-4 times daily. Meteorologists look for "run-to-run" consistency in models individually and agreement amongst many different models to increase confidence in a forecast. As of now, the two most reliable models have had a few corresponding, consistent runs to warrant attention, as does any tropical system this time of year.

Unfortunately, there are those who abuse this information and turn it into propaganda-a ploy for Facebook shares and Twitter retweets. Some have made blasphemous prophecies such as "hurricane threatens Gulf States next week." Quite simply, such a headline is an unscientific and irresponsible exclamation that contradicts the goal of a reputable meteorologist.

More troubling might be the reaction of seasoned meteorologists to this hype. They share and retweet the information themselves, of course with captions degrading the source for its bad information. Certainly worth pointing out, but also giving such a source exactly what it craves-more attention. Perhaps a more appropriate course of action would be to identify this source publicly, with a good old-fashioned "call-out." Another option, take the high road, and use time more efficiently by continuing to find and share accurate and reliable forecast data to those actively seeking out GOOD weather information.

The National Hurricane Center maintains a 50% chance of development for Invest 96L over the next five days.

The WBRZ Weather team has identified numerous obstacles Invest 96L would need to overcome for further development, including dry air and some wind shear the Caribbean Sea. Should it be able to make it through harsher conditions, forecast models carry the storm generally off to the WNW over the next 7 days.

The bottom line is, at such an early stage in the game, watching and staying prepared as usual is the extent of what should be done. Just like no outlandish forecasts should be made on one model's prediction alone, no brash life alterations should be made on long-term forecast possibilities alone.

As servants to the public with a goal of protecting life and property meteorologists can ask that you do yourself, your family and your friends a real favor. Don't buy into the hype. If you want a weather forecast to share or tweet, steal a reliable forecast from a trusted source-we won't mind.

You can get forecasts from Meteorologist Josh Eachus weekdays on 2une-In from 5-7 a.m. and News 2 at Noon from 12-1 p.m. Additionally, you can get the fastest and latest forecasts and weather news by checking in with wbrz.com/weather, connecting with Josh on Google+ and following him on Twitter.


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Heat and a Tropical Peek http://www.wbrz.com/news/heat-and-a-tropical-peek/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/heat-and-a-tropical-peek/ Weather Wed, 20 Aug 2014 4:00:03 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Heat and a Tropical Peek

Another hot and humid day is on the horizon. Early sunshine will promote a quick warmup into the lower 90s. By midday, with thermometers in the low 90s, convective cloud development could produce an isolated shower or thunderstorm-but only about 30% of the area in Southeast Louisiana and Southern Mississippi will receive rain today. The top out temperature will be near 94°.

The overnight hours will remain sticky and sweaty. Clouds will break but thermometers will struggle to leave the upper 70s.

There are two unorganized clusters of showers and thunderstorms approaching the Lesser Antilles. The tropical wave slightly farther west, Invest 96L, is given a 50% chance of development over the next 5 days by the National Hurricane Center. IF this system can survive harsh upper level conditions and dry air in the Caribbean Sea, there are a few forecast models that advance it towards the Gulf of Mexico by the middle of next week. More than a week out, there is very little skill in forecast models-especially with tropical systems, however anything in the tropics warrants attention as we enter the peak of hurricane season. As always, stay prepared.

The second wave is looking even less impressive as of Wednesday Morning and the National Hurricane Center puts its chances at 20% of development over the next 5 days.

Remember to follow @2StormView on Twitter and WBRZ Weather on Facebook for breaking tropical and local weather updates.


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Fewer showers, more heat http://www.wbrz.com/news/fewer-showers-more-heat/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/fewer-showers-more-heat/ Weather Tue, 19 Aug 2014 3:37:06 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Fewer showers, more heat

The day will be mainly sunny early with a quick warmup into the lower 90s. By noontime, vertical clouds will develop and perhaps grow enough to bring an isolated shower or thunderstorm. Although activity is expected to be far less widespread than on Monday, any storms that get wound up could provide heavy downpours and frequent lightning.

The nighttime hours mark an end to showers and a break in clouds. It will remain muggy with lows in the mid-70s.


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Like Sunday http://www.wbrz.com/news/like-sunday/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/like-sunday/ Weather Mon, 18 Aug 2014 3:48:39 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Like Sunday

Monday's weather will be similar to Sunday with scattered showers and thunderstorms developing late in the morning and moving about Southeast Louisiana and South Mississippi through the late afternoon hours. Any showers and storms could produce heavy downpours, frequent lightning and gusty winds. Prior to that, partly sunny skies will warm thermometers into the low 90s.

As shower coverage diminishes during the evening hours, skies will clear. Temperatures will stay sticky in the mid-70s.

 

 

 


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Heading into the weekend http://www.wbrz.com/news/heading-into-the-weekend/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/heading-into-the-weekend/ Weather Fri, 15 Aug 2014 3:37:35 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Heading into the weekend

Warm but not terribly humid conditions will be felt under mostly sunny Friday skies. Highs will make it to the low 90s.

The overnight will have an evening cloud or two followed by the all clear and lows in the 70s again. Mugginess will be creeping back.

The weekend won't feature the same atypical August weather as did the preceding week. Saturday Afternoon will be partly sunny, warm and a bit muggy with highs into the lower 90s. In all likelihood, afternoon showers will be relegated to the coast but aren't entirely impossible inland.

By Sunday, with August humidity back in full force and plenty of afternoon sunshine and warmth, an isolated shower or thunderstorm will pop-up within about 20-30% of our viewing area of South Mississippi and Southeast Louisiana.

 


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Breaker of humidity, deflector of hurricane http://www.wbrz.com/news/breaker-of-humidity-deflector-of-hurricane/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/breaker-of-humidity-deflector-of-hurricane/ Weather Wed, 13 Aug 2014 6:42:38 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Breaker of humidity, deflector of hurricane

Barely noticeable, but undeniably welcome, an August "cold front" is providing South Louisiana and Southern Mississippi with a slight downswing in the oppressive summertime humidity. The third and most subtle such occurrence this summer will keep temperatures near or just a touch below average, but mitigate the steam to greater extent. Accustomed to sweltering August weather, you might say it can't get better this time of year. But it can.

Exactly ten years ago, from August 13-18 2004, the region had a weather two-for. A cold front that etched an unprecedented six straight days worth of records also barricaded the area from a destructive hurricane.

As reported by the New Orleans/Baton Rouge National Weather Service, on August 12, 2004 an unseasonably potent cool air mass swept south across the United States. By the morning of August 13, Baton Rouge thermometers had dropped to 60° which is 14° below average. On August 14, the first of two mornings in the 50s found a low of 59°. Five more record lows would fall on subsequent mornings, with 58° on August 15 being the coolest August temperature ever recorded in Baton Rouge. Three record lows were also set in New Orleans.

The same record-breaking cold front in South Louisiana was paramount in steering powerful Category 4 Hurricane Charley out of the Central Gulf of Mexico and unfortunately into the west coast of Florida. The storm made landfall in Cayo Costa and Punta Gorda, Florida packing winds in excess of 145mph. Charley killed eight and caused over $5 billion in property damage to the state of Florida. The storm would re-emerge in the Atlantic and make a third U.S. landfall in South Carolina as a category 1 hurricane before the same, determined cold front snagged the storm and turned it extra-tropical.

So summertime cold fronts CAN get better than this-heat relief and hurricane protection. Yes, please.

You can get forecasts from Meteorologist Josh Eachus weekdays on 2une-In from 5-7am and News 2 at Noon from 12-1pm. Additionally, you can get the fastest and latest forecasts and weather news by checking in with wbrz.com/weather, connecting with Josh on Google+ and following him on Twitter.


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August, kind of http://www.wbrz.com/news/august-kind-of/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/august-kind-of/ Weather Wed, 13 Aug 2014 3:20:43 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus August, kind of

Weather somewhat unbecoming of August is expected over the next three days.

Many would likely take this weather all through August when compared with normal. Skies will be mostly sunny while thermometers run for the lower 90s. Humidity will exist, but not be as oppressive as can be for this time of year.

Tonight will be clear with some thermometers, especially along and north of I-12, dipping into the upper 60s. Elsewhere it will be near 70°.

The Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean are quiet. A wave off of the African Coast being monitored as of yesterday has dissipated.


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Cold front today http://www.wbrz.com/news/cold-front-today/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/cold-front-today/ Weather Tue, 12 Aug 2014 4:19:52 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Cold front today

Partly sunny skies may give way to a spotty shower or thunderstorm during the afternoon hours. While the Monday batch stabilized the atmosphere a bit, a cold front moving into warm, moist South Louisiana air may certainly trigger a shower as the front rolls through. As winds shift northwesterly with the front, highs should settle a little lower than Monday in the lower 90s.

Overnight, skies will clear from northwest to southeast with thermometers holding in the low 70s. A slight drop in humidity is possible.

 


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My Airy Cousin http://www.wbrz.com/news/my-airy-cousin/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/my-airy-cousin/ Weather Tue, 12 Aug 2014 3:45:39 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus My Airy Cousin

On Monday, a line of showers and thunderstorms passed through the Baton Rouge area with a photogenic phenomenon leading the way.

While the parent trigger for the shower and thunderstorm activity was a cold front, what set up on the leading edge of evening precipitation is known as a gust front.

The National Weather Service defines a gust front as "the leading edge of gusty surface winds from thunderstorm downdrafts." Cold air from high up in storm clouds is much denser than relatively warmer surface air and thus it comes crashing to the surface. Once it hits the ground, the air spreads outward, much in the same fashion as pancake batter when poured onto a griddle. Often the winds blow in the same direction the storm is travelling.

Indeed on Monday Evening many experienced gusty winds well before any rain or thunder and the ominous looking low, stacked, dark cloud that precluded the winds is called a shelf cloud. The National Weather Service defines a shelf cloud as "a low, horizontal wedge-shaped cloud, associated with a thunderstorm gust front. A rising cloud motion often can be seen in the leading part of the shelf cloud, while the underside often appears turbulent, boiling, and wind-torn." Because shelf clouds are so low and thick, blocking the sun's light, they often appear very dark.

The gust front can also be detected on radar. Notice in the attached image the white arrows pointing towards a narrow strip of precipitation just out ahead of the main batch of rain. This is the thick, turbulent cloud associated with the gust front that contains just a little bit of rain within.

Many around the area snapped photos of these weather features on Monday Evening. Remember anytime you see weather happening to send us those shots via weather@wbrz.com or on Twitter @Josh_Eachus, @RG3WBRZ and @Pat_Shingleton.

You can get forecasts from Meteorologist Josh Eachus weekdays on 2une-In from 5-7am and News 2 at Noon from 12-1pm. Additionally, you can get the fastest and latest forecasts and weather news by checking in with wbrz.com/weather, connecting with Josh on Google+ and following him on Twitter.


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More summer showers http://www.wbrz.com/news/more-summer-showers/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/more-summer-showers/ Weather Mon, 11 Aug 2014 3:55:59 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus More summer showers

As many get back to school, Monday Afternoon will get back to showery and stormy weather.

Some early sunshine will aid another quick warmup into the low 90s. With humidity staying high, expect scattered showers and storms to bubble up during the afternoon hours. As has been the case of late, any storms may produce heavy downpours and frequent lightning.

Overnight, a cold front will approach the area which should break the typical pattern of showers ending overnight. Due to the presence of that front, scattered showers may persist and even intensify closer to the morning hours. Low temperatures will remain muggy in the low 70s.


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Super moon viewing http://www.wbrz.com/news/super-moon-viewing/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/super-moon-viewing/ Weather Fri, 8 Aug 2014 4:02:15 PM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Super moon viewing

Have the telescope ready, a second supermoon will be visible on Sunday Night.

A supermoon occurs when it is full at the same time it is passing closest to earth during orbit-known as its perigee.

The moon will turn full at 1:09pm local time on Sunday, August 10.

This is the fourth of five supermoons occurring in 2014-the final will be on September 9. However, this installment will be the largest.

According to NASA scientists, supermoons appear up to 14% closer and 30% brighter than an ordinary full moon.

The best time to view a supermoon is around dusk. Moonrise on Sunday is at 6:56pm.

Sky gazers will be treated to something extra when observing the upcoming supermoon as it coincides with the Perseid Meteor Shower. However, the bright light of the supermoon will wash out all but the brightest meteors in the shower according to the International Meteor Organization.

While optimal viewing conditions are highly weather dependent, the WBRZ Weather Team is forecasting clearing skies for Sunday Evening, meaning many should have an opportunity to spot and photograph the phenomenon.

Send us your supermoon pictures so we can share them on WBRZ News 2 broadcasts!

Email: weather@wbrz.com
Twitter: @Josh_Eachus, @RG3WBRZ, @Pat_Shingleton

You can get forecasts from Meteorologist Josh Eachus weekdays on 2une-In from 5-7am and News 2 at Noon from 12-1pm. Additionally, you can get the fastest and latest forecasts and weather news by checking in with wbrz.com/weather, connecting with Josh on Google+ and following him on Twitter.


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Deja vu, or just another August in Baton Rouge? http://www.wbrz.com/news/deja-vu-or-just-another-august-in-baton-rouge-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/deja-vu-or-just-another-august-in-baton-rouge-/ Weather Fri, 8 Aug 2014 3:59:24 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III Deja vu, or just another August in Baton Rouge?

Either there is a glitch in the Matrix, or it's just August again in Baton Rouge. Not much is expected to change over the next few days. An area of high pressure in the gulf is keeping our rain chances low, but not impossible. Daytime heating will easily allow a pop up thunderstorm or two, but most of us will end up dry. We will all end up hot with temperatures reaching the mid 90s again, dew points in the mid 70's, and heat indices well above 100. As the high pressure shifts over the weekend, our rain chances rise a bit into Sunday, but still on the low side. Other than that, not much is expected to change over the next week.

TROPICS
The Atlantic, Gulf, and Caribbean is quiet. We don't expect any development in the next 48 hours. That's good news for us, but Hawaii is dealing with Iselle now who has been downgraded to a tropical storm. Julio, right behind, is still a category 3. Julio is forecasted to pass toward the north luckily, grazing by the islands as opposed to direct impact. Hawaii also experienced a 4.5 earthquake yesterday.

On Facebook: Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III

On Twitter: @RG3wbrz

~RG3

 


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Below average tropical season looking more likely http://www.wbrz.com/news/below-average-tropical-season-looking-more-likely/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/below-average-tropical-season-looking-more-likely/ Weather Thu, 7 Aug 2014 3:27:00 PM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Below average tropical season looking more likely

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Prediction Center forecasters have increased the likelihood for a below normal tropical season with Thursday's updated Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook.

Experts are now projecting a 70% chance of a below normal season, while at season's beginning that chance stood at 50%.

Specifically, forecasters are now calling for 7-12 named storms, 3-6 hurricanes and 0-2 major hurricanes compared to the pre-season prediction of 8-13 named storms, 3-6 hurricanes and 1-2 major hurricanes. The updated numbers include Arthur and Bertha which have already come and gone.

There are a few reasons for increased confidence in a below normal season.

Atmospheric conditions remain unfavorable for tropical cyclone development. Strong vertical wind shear, a weaker West African monsoon, increased atmospheric stability and sinking air motions all contribute to fewer storms coming off of the African Coast. Plus, these conditions mean those that do develop will have a tougher time reaching hurricane status.

Oceanic conditions are not favorable for storm development either. Below-average water temperatures are extremely cool when compared to the remainder of the global tropics.

The unfavorable atmosphere and cooler waters are even more exaggerated now that initially projected to be in May.

In addition, El Nino is still likely to develop later this year and suppress storm development by enhancing the aforementioned conditions. El Nino is anticipated to emerge sometime between August and October, peaking in late fall or early winter. Of course, the emergence time frame falls in the peak of hurricane season.

Still, Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal forecaster at NOAA's CPC advises coastal residents to remain on alert as storms can still strike the U.S. despite below average activity-evidencing Arthur which made landfall in North Carolina during early July.

It only takes one.

You can get forecasts from Meteorologist Josh Eachus weekdays on 2une-In from 5-7am and News 2 at Noon from 12-1pm. Additionally, you can get the fastest and latest forecasts and weather news by checking in with wbrz.com/weather, connecting with Josh on Google+ and following him on Twitter.


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Same old, same old http://www.wbrz.com/news/same-old-same-old/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/same-old-same-old/ Weather Thu, 7 Aug 2014 2:37:57 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III Same old, same old

Forecast Discussion: Aside from the ever-present August heat and humidity, there is little else destabilizing our atmosphere. The only surface weather feature of note is a weak high pressure system in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and a broad upper level ridge to our west. Combined the two systems will slacken off shower development during the afternoon hours through the weekend. Despite the weak suppression of surface air, the high heat and humidity will allow very isolated convection to spark off along sea breeze boundaries the next several days. Look for rain in only about 20% of the area within Southeast Louisiana and Southern Mississippi.

Today and Tonight: Blue skies and sunshine early will allow a quick warmup to 90° by lunchtime. The hefty heat and humidity will bubble up a cumulus cloud deck this afternoon-a few of which could squeeze out a thundershower. By and large though, most locations will stay partly sunny and dry with highs in the mid-90s. Overnight will be quiet but sticky with lows in the mid-70s.

Into the Weekend: Friday and the weekend are copy and paste weather forecasts-- partly sunny skies with isolated afternoon thundershowers. Highs will be in the mid-90s with lows in the mid-70s. High dew points will lead to afternoon feels-like readings exceeding 100°.

The Tropics: The tropics are queit and Bertha is no more! Hurricane Iselle however, in the Pacific, will be Hawaii's first landfalling hurricane in years. Iselle's current sustained winds are at 90mph and she is expected to make landfall Thursday night.

 

On Facebook: Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III

On Twitter: @RG3wbrz

 

~RG3

 

 


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Another August Day http://www.wbrz.com/news/another-august-day/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/another-august-day/ Weather Wed, 6 Aug 2014 3:35:06 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Another August Day

The middle portion of this week will mark the divider between afternoon thundershower coverage going from scattered to isolated.

Tuesday's forecast called for a 40% chance of rain, indicating that approximately 40% of the viewing area in Southeast Louisiana and Southern Mississippi should have seen measurable rain. Looking at the rain totals, indeed about 40% coverage of rainfall was observed.

For much more on rain chances amd what they mean, click here.

Unlike Tuesday, expect afternoon shower and storm coverage to back off into the isolated category. About 30% of the area will experience a pop-up shower. That means many locations in South Louisiana and Southern Mississippi will keep it dry today. Skies will be partly sunny with a humid high in the low 90s.

The overnight hours will be muggy under mostly clear skies. Lows will be in the mid 70s.


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July to August, can you feel it? http://www.wbrz.com/news/july-to-august-can-you-feel-it-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/july-to-august-can-you-feel-it-/ Weather Tue, 5 Aug 2014 5:02:21 PM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III July to August, can you feel it?

As we move into August, there isn't much of a change to be felt. Instead of going up a degree like we do in the month of July, we go down just a degree or two by the end of August.  Our monotonous Louisiana summer season continues, but soon we will be on the cool side of the summer.

We reached our highest temperature of the year so far on July 26th when we reached 95 degrees. That doesn't seem too extreme, but we still have the rest of August to get through. Hopefully 95 is as hot as we get, but August is typically the hottest month in south Louisiana.

We experienced a few cold fronts in July, and that brought our temperatures down quite bit; relatively speaking. We even broke a record low on July 17th when our low reached 62 degrees. The next day, we broke a daily record rainfall of 3.57 inches. The main relief from the fronts was from the lower humidity felt across the region. July 4th weekend especially. We don't often see cold fronts pushing all the way to the Gulf Coast in July, but we welcome them. Our average low temperature for July is 72.7 degrees. This July, our average was actually 71.4, which made our July at least one standard deviation below average, which is statistically significant. Let's hope August maintains the pattern!

 


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An August Tuesday http://www.wbrz.com/news/an-august-tuesday/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/an-august-tuesday/ Weather Tue, 5 Aug 2014 3:29:17 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus An August Tuesday

Another day will start off with a sun and cloud mix before storm clouds blow up in the afternoon. Once again, scattered activity is expected during the peak heating hours and thunderstorms could be slow-movers with a lot of rain and lightning. Top out temperatures will reach the low 90s.

As night falls, shower and storm coverage will decrease while skies remain partly cloudy and the air stays sticky.

 


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