WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Weather Weather en-us Copyright 2018, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Mon, 10 Dec 2018 HH:12:ss GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 A Couple of Cold Nights Ahead http://www.wbrz.com/news/a-couple-of-cold-nights-ahead/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/a-couple-of-cold-nights-ahead/ Weather Sun, 9 Dec 2018 6:20:14 PM Meteorologist Matt Callihan A Couple of Cold Nights Ahead

THE FORECAST: 

Tonight and Tomorrow: Clouds continue to linger this evening, but will be breaking up through the overnight period. This will open the door to a chilly start to the workweek, as temperatures will be around 34° Monday morning. Winds are set to also stay elevated out of the northwest, allowing for wind chill values that will hover near 30° until 9 AM. Winds will begin to slow through the day on Monday, as temperatures break back into the low 50s through the afternoon. Keep the jackets close though, lows will be plummeting below freezing overnight into Tuesday morning.

 Up Next:  Sunny skies will stay the course through the beginning part of the workweek, with clouds and showers returning on Thursday. Conditions will also be warming during this time period, with highs into the 70s mid-week.    

 

THE EXPLANATION:

High pressure is the dominate weather feature over the next several days, keeping clouds at a minimum through Tuesday. This will also allow for very cold nights Monday and Tuesday, as the lack of clouds and low winds will be efficient at losing heat rapidly from the ground surface after sunset. Clouds and temperatures slowly increase Wednesday and Thursday, ahead of a frontal system that will approach the area. A warm front on Thursday will briefly bring highs back into the low 70s on, with showers and storms possible throughout the day – peaking through the afternoon hours. Showers are forecast to linger into Friday morning, but drying and clearing skies will be present by noon, as the low pressure system continues off toward the east. A dry and warming weekend is forecast, as highs settle near average values for mid-December.

 

--Meteorologist Matt Callihan

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Showers Departing the Area http://www.wbrz.com/news/showers-departing-the-area/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/showers-departing-the-area/ Weather Sat, 8 Dec 2018 4:32:35 PM Meteorologist Matt Callihan Showers Departing the Area

THE FORECAST: 

Tonight and Tomorrow: There is a chance for a rogue drizzle tonight, but it will be rather slim. Clouds will be lingering overnight, as winds will stay elevated from 5 to 15 mph from the northwest. This will bring cooler air into the region, with overnight lows dropping to around 41°. Clouds will actually keep temperatures slightly warmer than they should be as we proceed into Sunday, but highs will struggle to break into the 50s through the afternoon hours. Clouds will begin to break through the early evening, allowing for temperatures to plummet into the mid-30s Sunday night.

 

Up Next:  High pressure slowly moves in at the tail end of the weekend, bringing sunny skies back in the forecast on Monday. Clear skies will continue through Wednesday, before showers return late Thursday and Friday morning. A couple of cold nights ahead, with lows nearing freezing Sunday and Monday night.    

 

THE EXPLANATION:

The low pressure system that brought us substantial rainfall through Saturday afternoon will slowly continue east along the Gulf coast through the remainder of the weekend. This slow speed associated with this system, will keep skies mostly cloudy through the majority of the day on Sunday. It finally breaks into the Atlantic along the Georgia Coast late Sunday, which will finally allow clouds to break heading through the evening hours and overnight into Monday. Skies will stay clear through the beginning part of the workweek, as high pressure moves in from our northwest. This high is also bringing with it cool air, allowing for highs to stay confined into the mid-50s, and lows in the low-to-mid-30s Sunday through Tuesday. Our next cold front will be approaching on Thursday, bumping high temperatures up near 70°, but showers will return Thursday afternoon through Friday morning. This system late in the week should not be a wash out, and currently has little chance of being severe.

 

--Meteorologist Matt Callihan

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Saturday soak could cause flooding for some http://www.wbrz.com/news/watch-meteorologist-matt-callihan-is-live-with-an-update-on-rainfall-and-flooding-potential-through-today/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/watch-meteorologist-matt-callihan-is-live-with-an-update-on-rainfall-and-flooding-potential-through-today/ Weather Fri, 7 Dec 2018 6:16:31 AM Chief Meteorologist, Dr. Josh Eachus Saturday soak could cause flooding for some

CLICK HERE to watch Meteorologist Matt Callihan's update on Saturday's forecast.

Widespread, occasionally heavy rainfall is expected on Saturday. While some flooding could occur in typical trouble spots, the short duration of the event should prevent any serious issues.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: An area of low pressure will develop over Texas on Friday sending cloud cover and showers into the region by evening. Not all will receive rain on Friday, but the umbrella is a good contingency for date night. Expect high temperatures in the low to mod 60s. Overnight will be cloudy with showers increasing from west to east near daybreak. Lows temperatures will stop in the low 50s.

The National Weather Service has issued a FLASH FLOOD WATCH for St. Mary Parish. There, 3 to 5 inches of rain and isolated higher amounts will possible. Low lying, poorly drained, areas are the locations with the greatest potential to see flooding issues. Winter weather bulletins have been from the Midwest to Carolinas for significant snow and ice on the north side of this storm.

Up Next: A significant amount of moisture will accompany a storm system across the central Gulf Coast on Saturday leading to widespread rain. Two to three inches could fall through Saturday night. Since there has not been heavy rain in quite a while, most grounds should handle this fairly well and river flooding is not expected. However, with downpours in a short time, streets and poorly drained areas may briefly flood. This would be most likely in the typical trouble spots.

The steadiest, heaviest period of rain is expected between 6am – 4pm. High temperatures will break into the 60s during this time, but dry and chilly conditions will return on behind a cold front. Showers will end from west to east Saturday night, but clouds could linger through much of Sunday.

THE EXPLANATION:

A shortwave trough moving across the southern third of the country will be the catalyst for active weather across the Midwest and Gulf Coast through the weekend. This trough will cause a surface low pressure system to strengthen over Texas on Friday. This will increase the southerly flow, priming the atmosphere with abundant moisture and precipitable water values near records for the time of year. Forecast models remain in good agreement that the low will track east, northeastward across Texas and the Gulf Coast with widespread heavy rain—especially on Saturday. Fortunately, this will be a fast moving system, which will limit total rainfall amounts, but strong forcing created by the low, ample divergence aloft, and very high atmospheric moisture content will lead to two or possibly three inches of rain in many locations. The Weather Prediction Center indicates a 2 out of 4 “slight risk” for excessive rainfall. Rivers should be able to tolerate this runoff, but typically flood prone areas could have some issues on Saturday.   Additionally, forecast models continue to keep instability confined to coastal areas. There will be some severe thunderstorm potential in those areas with just a few rumbles of thunder further inland. A slight shift inland by the surface low could bring the threat of severe thunderstorms farther north towards the I-10 corridor. Much cooler than average temperatures will return for the first part of next week.        

--Dr. Josh

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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First U.S. Utility to Promise 100% Carbon Reduction http://www.wbrz.com/news/first-u-s-utility-to-promise-100-carbon-reduction/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/first-u-s-utility-to-promise-100-carbon-reduction/ Weather Thu, 6 Dec 2018 12:25:44 PM Meteorologist Matt Callihan First U.S. Utility to Promise 100% Carbon Reduction

Oakland, CA - On December 4, 2018, Excel Energy took an important step to act on the dire problem of climate change, announcing that it will reduce its carbon emissions 100% by 2050, with an interim target of 80% by 2030. Lila Holzman, who is the energy program manager of As You Sow – a non-profit organization that promotes environmental and social corporate responsibility implores Xcel, stating, “Investors applaud this important step toward addressing Xcel’s climate impact and transitioning to a more sustainable business model. By committing to such ambitious reductions, Xcel is positioning itself to thrive in the coming low-carbon energy economy.” She goes on to describe the pivot and change that energy companies are now needing to consider, “Those companies that choose to diversify away from fossil fuels and expand energy efficiency and use of renewable energy sources are positioning themselves to prosper in the new energy economy.”  

Xcel Energy Inc., based out of Minneapolis, Minnesota, serves more than 3.3 million electric customers and 1.8 million natural gas customers in Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin, North Dakota, South Dakota, Colorado, Texas, and New Mexico. Xcel Energy attains most of its energy from its 13 coal plants, 7 of which are located in Colorado. Xcel is no stranger to green energy though. In October 6 of 2011, Excel set a world record for electricity from wind power in Colorado. In the early morning hours, 55.6% of the electricity used by Xcel’s 1 million customers came from three wind farms from across the Centennial State. They also own 2 nuclear and 27 hydroelectric plants across Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Colorado. They have recently built 4 biomass electricity plants, which produces electricity from organic fuel sources such as treetops, tree limbs, turkey litter, coal waste, wood waste, railroad ties, discarded tires, natural gas waste, and petroleum coke. There is also a plan to install biomass gasification technology at one of its plants that would produce energy from most waste that would otherwise end up in landfills.

This shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy is one that could have devastating effects on the weather and environment if not done quickly. Chief among the impacts of our emissions is the rise in global temperature.

That is why countries around the world have agreed to limit that warming to well below 2°C above the pre-industrial temperatures. This will require drastic and immediate emissions cuts, scaling up of energy solutions that are already in place, lower-carbon transportation, and increasing sustainable farming practices. This window is closing rapidly and will likely require new technologies to remove carbon from the atmosphere, since there is already so much that is currently present. The primary origin of greenhouse gas emissions has recently been passed from electricity generation to transportation, but power generation still sits at a close second.

Of those rising emissions, the highest and steepest concentration is that of Carbon Dioxide. Carbon Dioxide is a variable gas, currently comprising about .041% of the atmosphere by volume. This is up from about .028% before the industrial revolution of 1760. The concern with this gas, is that it is increasing rapidly and very efficient at absorbing solar radiation and keeping that heat in the lower atmosphere. This gas normally varies both daily and seasonally due to plants ability to intake carbon dioxide through photosynthesis, but is balanced yearly through this process. Unfortunately, since the post-industrial area, this balance has fallen apart due to the decrease in plant biomass and the increase in carbon dioxide exhaust from the burning of fossil fuels. Increasing this concentration by 68% has taken 180 years, but it is likely to take several hundred years for that concentration to drop back down to around .28%. This is why drastic changes are needed, and carbon dioxide emissions need to be greatly reduced in the next 30 years to keep us from continuing to warm.

9 out of the hottest 10 years globally have occurred since 2000, with the only outlier in the group happening in 1998. That record goes back to 1881, as we are effectively around 2.0°F warmer than normal. The issue is not necessarily the warming, it is the rate of warming. Just in the last three years, the average deviation from normal is just over 2°F, but before 2015, that number was closer to 1.4°F.

The way we get our energy may be something that needs to be re-evaluated. Where homeowners are now beginning to install solar panels and wind turbines to off-set energy costs, and at times even receiving money from energy companies for them taking their surplus energy. This also alleviates stress on the energy grid, which could help to allow outages to be more isolated and sparse. It also has been leading to the decrease in solar purchase and installation costs, allowing it to be a more viable option to the average homeowner.   


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Strong storm system to cross the area Saturday http://www.wbrz.com/news/strong-storm-system-to-cross-the-area-saturday/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/strong-storm-system-to-cross-the-area-saturday/ Weather Thu, 6 Dec 2018 6:16:36 AM Chief Meteorologist, Dr. Josh Eachus Strong storm system to cross the area Saturday

A bit of warming will precede the next storm system. A period of steady, possibly heavy, rain could impact your weekend plans.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: Warming will begin on Thursday afternoon with high temperatures jogging into the low 60s. Clouds will begin to develop as well, with thickening coverage through the day. Each of these changes will be in response to a southeasterly wind shift. Overnight will be mostly cloudy with low temperatures in the upper 40s.     

Up Next: An area of low pressure will develop over Texas on Friday sending cloud cover and showers into the region by evening. Not all will receive rain on Friday, but the umbrella is a good contingency for date night. A significant amount of moisture will accompany a storm system across the central Gulf Coast on Saturday leading to widespread rain. The current, estimated timeline is for most of the rain to occur between dawn and dusk. Two to three inches could fall through Saturday night. Since there has not been heavy rain in quite a while, grounds should handle this fairly well and river flooding is not expected. However, with downpours in a short time, streets and poorly drained areas may briefly flood. High temperatures will break into the 60s during this time, but dry and chilly conditions will return on behind a cold front. Showers will end from west to east Saturday night, but clouds could linger through much of Sunday.

THE EXPLANATION:

High pressure will cross into the Southeast on Thursday, allowing winds to turn around to the southeast. Resulting return flow will begin a gradual increase of moisture in the atmosphere. At first, this will be reflected by slightly warmer temperatures and increased cloud development.

A shortwave trough is digging into the Southwest U.S. and will become the catalyst for active weather across the Midwest and Gulf Coast through the weekend. This trough will cut across the southern third of the United States and cause a surface low pressure system to strengthen over Texas on Friday. This will increase the southerly flow, priming the atmosphere with abundant moisture and precipitable water values near records for the time of year. Forecast models remain in good agreement that the low will track east, northeastward across Texas and the Gulf Coast with widespread heavy rain—especially on Saturday.

Fortunately, this will be a fast moving system, which will limit total rainfall amounts, but strong forcing created by the low, ample divergence aloft, and very high atmospheric moisture content will lead to two or possibly three inches of rain in many locations. The Weather Prediction Center indicates a 2 out of 4 “slight risk” for excessive rainfall. Rivers should be able to tolerate this runoff, but typically flood prone areas could have some issues on Saturday.   Additionally, forecast models continue to keep instability confined to coastal areas. There will be some severe thunderstorm potential in those areas with just a few rumbles of thunder further inland. A slight shift inland by the surface low could bring the threat of severe thunderstorms farther north towards the I-10 corridor. Much cooler than average temperatures will return for the first part of next week.         

--Dr. Josh

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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SpaceX Launching Mice to Space http://www.wbrz.com/news/spacex-launching-mice-to-space/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/spacex-launching-mice-to-space/ Weather Wed, 5 Dec 2018 11:47:34 AM Meteorologist Matt Callihan SpaceX Launching Mice to Space

Space X is ready to launch another cargo mission to the International Space Station on Wednesday. A Falcon 9 rocket will be launching a Dragon capsule from Cape Canaveral Air Force Base in Florida. This will be the Dragon’s second supply mission to the orbiting lab, with its first back in early 2017. The launch window is set to open at 12:16 PM CST on Wednesday, and the forecast is at a 90% chance for a go. You can watch the launch live here.

Image: CRS_16 ready for the December 5, 2018 launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

Image Credit: NASA

The Dragon capsule will be delivering more than 5,600 lbs. of food, supplies, and scientific experiments to the crewmembers on the ISS – making it SpaceX’s 16th cargo mission under their contract with NASA. This launch was actually supposed to take off yesterday, but was delayed a day because the mouse food accompanying a rodent experiment was found to be moldy and needed to be replaced. There are several experiments that will also be on board including: the Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) instrument, the Robotic Refueling Mission 3 (RRM3), and the Rodent Research-8.

Image: Dragon capsule atop a brand new Falcon 9 rocket at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

Image Credit: NASA

The Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) high resolution laser ranging of Earth’s forests and topography will provide answers to how deforestation has contributed to atmospheric CO2 concentration. It will also provide details on how much carbon, forests will absorb in the future, as well as how habitat degradation will affect global biodiversity. This research is done through the use of a full-waveform lidar instrument that makes detailed measurements of the 3D structure of the Earth’s surface. Lidar is the laser version of radar, which is able to determine depth and structure of an object (ie. The Earth’s surface) at great detail and resolution. This study is incredibly important for forest and water resource management, carbon cycle science, and weather prediction. Weather forecasting will be enhanced through the improved canopy aerodynamic profiles in order to implement them into existing weather models. Essentially, the biomass and tree canopy thickness and location will provide insight into how Earth’s vegetation will impact future weather systems. Incorporating this detailed information into an existing weather model should give more accuracy to boundary layer (interaction with the ground surface and the lower atmosphere) physics. This project will also aid in the accuracy of climate models, and the impacts of land use change on the climate.

Image: GEDI Instrument showing lasers, optical paths, detectors, and digitizers.

Image Credit: University of Maryland.

The Robotic Refueling Mission 3 is an imperative study in order to determine the potential for long-term space travel. Spacecraft and satellites use propellant and coolant in order to perform key functions like maintaining critical equipment and maneuvering to stay in a specific location in orbit. These consumables eventually run out, but this study is hoping to provide a service for autonomously refueling spacecraft. This project will attempt to demonstrate innovative methods to store, transfer, and freeze standard cryogenic fluid in space. These fluids consist of liquid methane, liquid hydrogen, and liquid oxygen, but it would be more efficient and easier to store in their frozen states. This would also open the door to being able to refuel on the moon or on other planets, providing additional weight for Earth launching spacecraft.

Image: The ability to replenish and store cryogenic fluid can help with exploration. Here are some ways technologies demonstrated by RRM3 could be used at the Moon and Mars.

Image Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

The Rodent Research-8 project will be examining the physiology of aging and the effect of age on disease progression on young and old mice. Some of these mice will be flow up to space on the ISS, and others will stay on Earth to be the control group. Spaceflight has been shown to accelerate aging in humans and rodents. Young and old mice will travel to the ISS for 30-to 40-day or 60-day durations in order to provide researchers with better insight into disease processes related to bone loss, immune dysfunction, cardiovascular deconditioning, and loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. This research will be able to evaluate: 1) muscle atrophy under microgravity conditions, and to identify pathways and targets that could be used to develop therapeutics for muscle disease. This aim focuses on hind limbs collected from groups of mice exposed to spaceflight for various lengths of time. 2) Changes in various molecular markers from several tissues, such as whole blood, brain, heart, lungs, kidney/adrenal glands, liver, spleen, and small intestines (some tissues are dissected in flight, and the remaining ones on Earth). 3) Scanning mice using a bone densitometer at mission middle, and end-points, to characterize the effects of microgravity on skeletal tissues. This is expected to establish the magnitude and time-course of bone loss during spaceflight exposure for future commercial bone drug testing.

The Dragon spacecraft will reach the International Space Station on Saturday, which will bring the number of visiting spacecraft at the International Space Station to six. Three robotic cargo ships – Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus and two Russian Progress freighters – and two Soyuz crew spacecraft. The Dragon is schedule to return to Earth via an ocean splashdown in mid-January.


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Cool temps continue, on standby for Saturday soaker http://www.wbrz.com/news/cool-temps-continue-on-standby-for-saturday-soaker/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/cool-temps-continue-on-standby-for-saturday-soaker/ Weather Wed, 5 Dec 2018 5:57:11 AM Chief Meteorologist, Dr. Josh Eachus Cool temps continue, on standby for Saturday soaker

Clear, cool conditions will prevail with frosty mornings through Thursday. The next storm system could bring a considerable amount of rain into the weekend.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: Your Wednesday will be welcomed by more sunshine. After a cool start, temperatures will again stop in the mid to upper 50s with northeast winds of 5-10mph. Skies are expected to stay clear through the night with thermometers in the mid to upper 30s leading to some patchy frost.    

Up Next: Warming will then begin on Thursday afternoon, as cloud cover slowly increases ahead of an approaching storm system. An area of low pressure will develop the in western Gulf of Mexico on Friday sending a significant amount of moisture to the central Gulf Coast. Two to three inches of rain could fall through Saturday night. High temperatures may briefly break into the 60s during this time, but dry and chilly conditions will return on Sunday behind a cold front.

THE EXPLANATION:

Expect temperatures of 10-15 degrees below normal through Thursday morning. High pressure will build into the south through midweek, moving across Louisiana on Wednesday. Tuesday and Wednesday nights will be the coldest with some isolated freezes possible in typical cool spots north of I-12. Forecast models are in good agreement regarding the next impact weather system expected to arrive at the end of the week. A shortwave trough will cut across the southern third of the United States and cause a surface low pressure system to generate across the Southwest U.S. on Friday. Forecast models remain in good agreement that the low will track east, northeastward across Texas and the Gulf Coast with widespread heavy rain Friday night into Saturday. Fortunately, this will be a fast moving system, which will limit total rainfall amounts, but strong forcing created by the low, ample divergence aloft, and very high atmospheric moisture content will lead to two or possibly three inches of rain in many locations. Additionally, forecast models continue to keep instability confined to coastal areas.

There will be some severe thunderstorm potential in those areas with just a few rumbles of thunder further inland. A slight shift inland by the surface low could bring the threat of severe thunderstorms farther north towards the I-10 corridor. Much cooler than average temperatures will return for the first part of next week.         

--Dr. Josh

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Chillin 'til Friday http://www.wbrz.com/news/chillin-til-friday/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/chillin-til-friday/ Weather Tue, 4 Dec 2018 5:51:16 AM Chief Meteorologist, Dr. Josh Eachus Chillin 'til Friday

Temperatures have continued a downward trend since the warm weekend. Some spots could flirt with freezing Tuesday and Wednesday nights. Tranquil weather will last through Thursday.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: A seasonably chilly day is ahead. High temperatures will make it into the upper 50s, possibly snagging 60 degrees south of I-10. North winds of 5-10mph will make any additional warming difficult. Overnight will remain clear with our coldest temperatures of the week in the mid 30s. Some typical cool spots north of I-12 could flirt with freezing.  

Up Next: Clear skies and cool temperatures are expected through Thursday. Warming will then begin on Thursday afternoon, as cloud cover slowly increases ahead of an approaching storm system. An area of low pressure will develop the in western Gulf of Mexico on Friday sending a significant amount of moisture to the central Gulf Coast. Two to three inches of rain could fall through Saturday night. High temperatures may briefly break into the 60s during this time, but dry and chilly conditions will return on Sunday behind a cold front.

THE EXPLANATION:

Expect temperatures of 10-15 degrees below normal through Thursday morning. High pressure will build into the south through midweek, moving across Louisiana on Wednesday. Tuesday and Wednesday nights will be the coldest with some isolated freezes possible in typical cool spots north of I-12. Forecast models are in good agreement regarding the next impact weather system expected to arrive at the end of the week.

In summary, they depict a heavy rain threat, but do not indicate much chance for severe weather. An area of low pressure is expected to develop along the south Texas Coast in the climatologically favorable cyclogenesis zone. As surface high pressure sets up in the Southeast U.S. return flow will only strengthen as this low develops. In fact, as noted by the National Weather Service, moisture return through the atmosphere is expected to be significant enough to possibly set a new record for December 8th. The upper level pattern will allow ample space for this system to broaden and strengthen while the low level pattern will feature plenty of converging air generating the uplift for widespread heavy rain and thunderstorms. The Weather Prediction Center currently projects 1-2 inches for the local area, but this may need to be adjusted upward. Both the GFS and ECMWF models are closer to the 2-3 inches range.        

--Dr. Josh

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Catching a break, coming close to freezing again http://www.wbrz.com/news/catching-a-break-coming-close-to-freezing-again/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/catching-a-break-coming-close-to-freezing-again/ Weather Mon, 3 Dec 2018 6:21:05 AM Chief Meteorologist, Dr. Josh Eachus Catching a break, coming close to freezing again

A front will continue to push through the region on Monday. A cool and quiet week will follow.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: A weak cold front allowed some light cloud cover early this Monday morning, but skies will clear through the late morning hours. With north winds of 5-10mph, high temperatures will stop close to average, in the mid 60s. Beneath a clear sky overnight, low temperatures will dip into the low 40s.

Up Next: Clear skies and cool temperatures are expected through Thursday. A couple of cold nights will be experienced on Tuesday and Wednesday, as overnight lows drop into the mid-30s. Some isolated pockets of freezing temperatures are possible north of I-12. Warming will begin on Thursday afternoon, as cloud cover slowly increases ahead of an approaching storm system. An area of low pressure will develop the in western Gulf of Mexico on Friday sending a significant amount of moisture to the central Gulf Coast. Rather heavy rain could become an issue on Saturday. High temperatures will briefly break into the above average range during this time, but dry and chilly conditions will return on Sunday behind a cold front.

The Tropics: The 2018 Hurricane Season closed Friday. Here is a recap from the WBRZ Weather Team.

THE EXPLANATION:

A cold front will slip farther south of the region on Monday with northerly winds taking hold. It will take some time for the cooler air to arrive as it is lagging well behind the boundary. Expect that air mass to make it to the Gulf of Mexico overnight through leading to temperatures of 10-15 degrees below normal through Thursday morning. High pressure will build into the south through midweek, moving across Louisiana on Wednesday. Tuesday and Wednesday nights will be the coldest with some isolated freezes possible in typical cool spots north of I-12. Forecast models are in good agreement regarding the next impact weather system expected to arrive at the end of the week. In summary, they depict a heavy rain threat, but do not indicate much chance for severe weather.

An area of low pressure is expected to develop along the south Texas Coast in the climatologically favorable cyclogenesis zone. As surface high pressure sets up in the Southeast U.S. return flow will only strengthen as this low develops. In fact, as noted by the National Weather Service, moisture return through the atmosphere is expected to be significant enough to possibly set a new record for December 8th. The upper level pattern will allow ample space for this system to broaden and strengthen while the low level pattern will feature plenty of converging air generating the uplift for widespread heavy rain and thunderstorms. The Weather Prediction Center currently projects 1-2 inches for the local area, but this may need to be adjusted upward.       

--Dr. Josh

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Cooler Temperatures Moving In http://www.wbrz.com/news/cooler-temperatures-moving-in/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/cooler-temperatures-moving-in/ Weather Sun, 2 Dec 2018 6:46:56 PM Meteorologist Matt Callihan Cooler Temperatures Moving In

THE FORECAST: 

Tonight and Tomorrow: Mostly clear skies and drier air will allow temperatures to drop back into the upper 40s late tonight and into Monday morning. The lower dew points will bring much cooler temperatures into the region on Monday, as highs will be about 12 degrees cooler than what we experienced over the weekend. High pressure will also approach as we near the noon hour, which will break up the little bit of morning cloud cover and produce sunny skies through the rest of your Monday. Winds will be picking up between 5 and 10 mph out of the north, which will set up a cooler night on Monday that will linger into the beginning part of the workweek.

 

Up Next:  A high pressure system that extends from Canada to the Gulf Coast will keep skies sunny and temperatures chilly through Thursday morning. Low temperatures will be in the mid-30s Tuesday and Wednesday night. Our next weather maker will be approaching late Friday and Saturday, with heavy rainfall expected with this system.    

 

 

 

THE EXPLANATION:

The cold front that pushed across our region early Saturday morning is still stalled offshore, extending through Northern Florida and along the Carolina Coast. It will try to push inland over the extreme southeast of Louisiana, but the incoming high pressure from the northwest will keep skies relatively clear and conditions dry early Monday. High pressure will then dominate the weather pattern through the majority of the workweek, providing abundant sunshine and cooler temperatures. Lows will be approaching freezing Tuesday night, before slowly increasing through the rest of the week. A strong low pressure system will begin developing over Southern California on Thursday, and push east through the southwest US into Friday morning. This system will move into Texas and pull another low pressure system from the Gulf along the Louisiana Coast late Friday. Widespread showers will initiate around 6 PM Friday and continue through Saturday as the system moves west-to-east across the Gulf States. At this time, there is not much instability with this system, but significant moisture is present. Thunderstorms should stay isolated, but the heavy rainfall could be a concern for flooding on Saturday. This system is moving quickly, so the flooding threat should stay confined to flood-prone areas. The front departs late Saturday, as drier and cooler conditions return on Sunday.

 

--Meteorologist Matt Callihan

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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The warmth continues into Sunday http://www.wbrz.com/news/the-warmth-continues-into-sunday/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/the-warmth-continues-into-sunday/ Weather Sat, 1 Dec 2018 6:08:25 PM Meteorologist Matt Callihan The warmth continues into Sunday

THE FORECAST: 

Tonight and Tomorrow: A mild and pleasant night ahead. We can attribute these conditions to being in between frontal systems, allowing for southwest winds to keep a little bit of moisture in the atmosphere. This is allowing for clear skies, and temperatures to drop slowly into the mid-50s overnight. That will be setting us up for another warm day on Sunday, as highs will reach into the upper 70s and low 80s across our area. Clouds will slowly increase late Sunday night, but the incoming cold front from the northwest will be dry.

 

Up Next:  Sunny and cool conditions will ensue through the beginning part of the workweek, with highs in the mid-50s and lows in the low-to-mid 30s Tuesday and Wednesday. Warming returns on Thursday, as highs break into the 60s ahead of a system that will bring showers back into the forecast late Friday and Saturday.    

 

 

THE EXPLANATION:

The cold front that moved through our area Friday night and Saturday morning is slowly approaching the east coast. It is also flattening out as it is having a tough time moving south into the Gulf. This will keep rain chances possible to the extreme southeast of our state, with the majority of the moisture staying offshore. A dry cold front will march through from the northwest late Sunday and early Monday, dropping highs to around 70° Monday, with more cooling through the beginning part of the workweek. Lows will continue to plummet around 40° Monday, and hover in the mid-30s Tuesday and Wednesday night. Highs will stay in the mid-50s through the midweek, before warming returns on Thursday ahead of another approaching front from the northwest. Temperatures will break back into the above average range and near the 70s on Saturday as showers and storms will also returning late Friday, and stay through the day on Saturday.

 

--Meteorologist Matt Callihan

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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WBRZ Weather: "conditional" severe weather threat tonight http://www.wbrz.com/news/wbrz-weather-conditional-severe-weather-threat-tonight/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/wbrz-weather-conditional-severe-weather-threat-tonight/ Weather Fri, 30 Nov 2018 6:12:30 AM Chief Meteorologist, Dr. Josh Eachus WBRZ Weather:

Click here for a live update on storm potential.

Unseasonable mild, moist air will build across the central Gulf Coast and churn up showers and thunderstorms. One or two storms could be strong into Saturday.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: Overcast skies and spotty showers will remain in the forecast on Friday. High temperatures will reach the mid 70s with continued southerly winds of 5-10mph. Into the evening hours, an area of showers and thunderstorms will develop and push northward through the area.

From then into Saturday morning, any thunderstorm could be strong. Stay in touch for any alerts. It is important to point out that among severe weather forecasts, this one comes with low confidence. While some ingredients are very impressive for development, others are lacking. This event has bust potential and could end up being little more than scattered showers. See below for a more detailed discussion. Nighttime temperatures will be steady in the upper 60s.

Up Next: The threat for rain and severe weather will end on Saturday morning giving way to some afternoon sun and a rather mild weekend. High temperatures will stride for 80 degrees. Late Sunday, another system will come into the region returning clouds, showers and possibly a thunderstorm, but severe weather is unlikely. Showers may linger into Monday before a cold front with a stronger push of chilly air comes through the region. Starting Monday night, expect below average temperatures through the middle of next week.

Football Forecast: Like the local area, showers and thunderstorms will be diminishing through the day in Lorman, Mississippi as the Southern Jags get set for the SWAC Championship against Alcorn State. While lingering showers remain possible, the severe weather threat will be over and temperatures will stay mild in the low 70s.

The Tropics: The 2018 Hurricane Season closes today. Here is a recap from the WBRZ Weather Team.

THE EXPLANATION:

The next significant storm system will develop across the Western Plains Friday as a 500mb trough digs into the region and sends a surface low and cold front eastward. As this occurs, a secondary warm front will develop across the central Gulf Coast and move northeastward ahead of the cold front. Late Friday into Saturday morning, a negatively tilted trough will move across the Mid-Mississippi River Valley, with a strong surface low pressure over Kansas and Missouri and an attendant cold front extending southward. An area of showers and thunderstorms should develop near the secondary warm front over south Louisiana in response to destabilization from advancing dew points in the upper 60s and low 70s. Upper level forcing and overall instability will be weak which will be key limiting factors in widespread severe thunderstorms.

However, the wind profiles will be quite favorable for a brief period of time overnight, which along with the unseasonably high moisture, could allow some rotation in the low-levels of the atmosphere. An isolated tornado cannot be eliminated from the forecast. Given the position of the upper trough and surface low, the most favorable dynamics for strong thunderstorms are likely to remain north of the local area. Currently, the Storm Prediction Center highlights the greatest risk just north of the Baton Rouge area. However, the southeastern half of the WBRZ Weather Forecast area and closer to New Orleans, has been placed in a 2/5 “slight risk” for severe weather, telling us that one or two storms could be strong with damaging winds and an isolated  tornado being the main threats. After this system, there will be a brief break and perhaps even some sunshine prior to another trough and surface low cutting across the Mid-South. Sunday afternoon and evening, rain showers and a few thunderstorms will return to the area as Saturday’s former cold front drifts back to the north as a warm front. These storms will be elevated and therefore severe weather is a much lower concern. Showers may continue into Monday until another cold front finally pushes through the region. Even though the cold front may move through around midday, the bulk of the colder air will not begin to move into the region until the evening hours. With clear skies, high and low temperatures will be about 15 degrees below average Tuesday through Thursday.

--Dr. Josh

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Showers and warmth return, strong storms possible Friday night http://www.wbrz.com/news/showers-and-warmth-return-strong-storms-possible-friday-night/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/showers-and-warmth-return-strong-storms-possible-friday-night/ Weather Thu, 29 Nov 2018 6:18:46 AM Chief Meteorologist, Dr. Josh Eachus Showers and warmth return, strong storms possible Friday night

Chilly air is out for a while. With the warmth will come returning showers and thunderstorms.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: With a warmer starting point and continued southeasterly winds, Thursday afternoon temperatures will climb into the 70s ahead of a frontal system. Skies will be mostly cloudy with spotty showers possible. Clouds and isolated showers will continue overnight with considerably warmer lows in the mid 60s.

Up Next: Unseasonable mild, moist air will pool across the central Gulf Coast Friday and into Saturday, and this will be sufficient to churn up showers and thunderstorms. While the greatest threat for severe weather will likely stay north of the local area, parameters could still be in place for some stronger action locally, especially overnight into Saturday. At this time, it appears that activity will subside on Saturday afternoon allowing a brief break before the next round of showers during the late Sunday into early Monday period. Cooler air will follow that system.  

Football Forecast: Like the local area, showers and thunderstorms will be diminishing through the day in Lorman, Mississippi as the Southern Jags get set for the SWAC Championship against Alcorn State. While lingering showers remain possible, the severe weather threat will be over and temperatures will stay mild in the low 70s.

The Tropics: 

THE EXPLANATION:

Southerly winds will continue to push moisture into the atmosphere through the end of the week. As this occurs, overcast skies and spotty showers will develop on Thursday. The next significant storm system will develop across the Western Plains into Friday as a 500mb trough digs into the region and sends a surface low and cold front eastward. As this occurs, a secondary warm front will develop across the central Gulf Coast and move northeastward ahead of the cold front. Late Friday into Saturday morning, forecast model guidance shows a negatively tilted trough moving across the Mid-Mississippi River Valley, with a strong surface low pressure over Kansas and Missouri. An area of showers and thunderstorms should develop near the secondary warm front over south Louisiana in response to destabilization from advancing dew points in the upper 60s and low 70s. Upper level forcing will be weak which will be a key limiting factor in widespread severe thunderstorms. However, the wind profiles will be quite favorable for a brief period of time overnight, which along with the unseasonably high moisture, could allow some rotation in the low-levels of the atmosphere. An isolated tornado cannot be eliminated from the forecast. Given the position of the upper trough and surface low, the most favorable combination of shear and instability is likely to remain north of the local area.

Currently, the Storm Prediction Center highlights the greatest chance for severe weather just north of the Baton Rouge area. However, the entire local area has been placed in a 2/5 “slight risk” for severe weather, telling us that one or two storms could be strong with damaging winds being the main threat. But again, wind profiles suggest a tornado could spin up. After this system, there will be a brief break prior to another trough and surface low cutting across the Mid-South. Sunday afternoon and evening, rain showers and a few thunderstorms will return to the area as Saturday’s former cold front drifts back to the north as a warm front. These storms will be elevated and therefore severe weather is a much lower concern. Showers may continue into Monday until the a cold front finally pushes through the region. Even though the cold front may move through around midday, the bulk of the colder air will not begin to move into the region until the evening hours. High and low temperatures will be about 15 degrees below average Tuesday through Thursday.

--Dr. Josh

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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InSight has Landed on Mars & Preparing to Begin Research http://www.wbrz.com/news/insight-has-landed-on-mars-and-preparing-to-begin-research/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/insight-has-landed-on-mars-and-preparing-to-begin-research/ Weather Wed, 28 Nov 2018 5:58:53 PM Meteorologist Matt Callihan InSight has Landed on Mars & Preparing to Begin Research

On November 26, 2018, the Mars InSight spacecraft became the ninth spacecraft to land on Mars’ surface, and 1 of 5 that are now active on the Martian planet. This is after almost 7 months and 300 million miles of interstellar travel from Earth to its new home on the red planet.

Image: InSight lifts off on May 5 aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V Rocket

Image Credit: NASA/Cory Huston

The goals of this missions are many, but most have to do with looking into the past of this planet, and determining how rocky planets formed and evolved. The specific studies involved include understanding: 1) The size of Mars’ core, what it is made of, and whether it is liquid or sold, 2) The thickness and structure of the crust, 3) The structure of the mantle and what it is made of, 4) How warm the interior is and how much heat is still flowing through, 5) How powerful and frequent internal seismic activity is on Mars, and where it is located within the structure of the planet, 6) How often meteorites impact the surface of Mars. In order to answer these questions, there are three main instruments: 1) A seismometer, 2) A heat flow probe, and 3) A radio science experiment.

The seismometer senses seismic waves to study the crust of Mars. Meteorites impacting the surface, magma moving at great depths, or movement along a fault can all cause seismic waves on Mars. Studying the crust of Mars with the seismometer tells scientists about the temperature, pressure, and composition of the stuff that first formed this rocky planet.

Image: Artist’s concept of InSight’s SEIS Instrument, which is investigating the seismic activity of Mars.

Image Credit: NASA

The heat flow probe borrows deeper than any other scoops, drills, or probes on Mars before it. It will investigate how much heat is still flowing out of Mars. Its observations will shed light on whether Earth and Mars are made of the same stuff, and provide a sneak peek into how the planet evolved.

Image: Artist’s concept of InSight’s HP3 Instrument, which determines heat transfer within Mars’ core.

Image Credit: NASA

The Radio Science Experiment measures the slightest changes in the location of the lander to reveal how Mars is moving in its orbit. These measurements provide information on the nature of Mars’ deep inner core. They uncover the depth at which Mars’ core becomes solid, and what other minerals, besides iron, may be present.

Image: Artist’s concept of InSight’s RISE Antennas, precisely tracking the location of the lander to determine Mars’ wobble.

Image Credit: NASA

Mars has always been a tough challenge to orbit, land, or rove since the first mission back in 1960. The overall success rate of 51% for Mars missions is not comforting, until you break it down by countries. USA has had an impressive record, only failing on 5 out of 22 total Mars missions. Russia, on the other hand, has experienced quite a difficult time, with only 3 successful missions out of 18. That gets even worse when observing rover or lander missions, with Russia not being able to complete any attempts out of 6; USA has been almost perfect in this department, with only one mission failure out of ten. The reason it is such a tough task, is because Mars has an incredibly thin atmosphere. This atmosphere is only 1 % of Earth’s, which means that there is very little air friction in order to slow down the spacecraft.

Image: Map of all successful spacecraft landing on the surface of Mars.

Image Credit: NASA

Image: InSight’s first image from Mars.

Image Credit: NASA

InSight’s team hopes that by studying the deep interior of Mars, we can learn how other rocky worlds, including Earth and the Moon, formed. Our home planet and Mars were molded from the same primordial stuff more than 4.5 billion years ago but then became quite different. Why didn’t they share the same fate?

Image: Artist’s rendition showing the inner structure of Mars. The topmost layer is known as the crust, underneath it is the mantle, which rests on a solid inner core.

Image Credit: NASA

When it comes to rocky planets, we’ve studied only one in detail: Earth. By comparing Earth’s interior to that of Mars, Insight’s team members hope to better understand our solar system. What they learn might even aid the search for Earth-like exoplanets, narrowing down which ones might be able to support life. So while InSight is a Mars mission, it’s also much more than a Mars mission. InSight will operate for 728 days, but it is likely to outlive this initial lifespan – much like its predecessors.


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As warmer temps return, so will showers and thunderstorms http://www.wbrz.com/news/as-warmer-temps-return-so-will-showers-and-thunderstorms/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/as-warmer-temps-return-so-will-showers-and-thunderstorms/ Weather Wed, 28 Nov 2018 6:10:49 AM Chief Meteorologist, Dr. Josh Eachus As warmer temps return, so will showers and thunderstorms

Milder air will begin to infiltrate the region Wednesday afternoon. A few storm systems will need to be monitored through early next week.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: Surface high pressure sliding across the area will maintain mostly clear skies for one more day as a moderating temperature trend begins. Expect highs in the low to mid 60s with light, east winds. Overnight, those winds will shift southeasterly and lows will be considerably warmer, likely stopping in the low 50s. Skies will be mostly cloudy with some fog possible late.  

Up Next: With a warmer starting point and continued southeasterly winds, Thursday afternoon temperatures will climb into the 70s ahead of a frontal system. Skies will be mostly cloudy with spotty showers possible. That frontal system will cause mild air and moisture to pool across the central Gulf Coast Friday and into Saturday, and this will be sufficient to churn up showers and thunderstorms. While the greatest threat for severe weather will likely stay north of the local area, parameters could still be in place for some action locally, so stay in touch with the forecast. Another strong storm system is likely to follow on Monday.

The Tropics: With the official hurricane season ending this week, all is quiet. No development is expected in the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea or Atlantic Ocean.

THE EXPLANATION:

Thanks to a surface high pushing east through Mississippi, the area will remain calm and mostly clear on Wednesday with high temperatures moderating into the low 60s. Thursday through late week, the aforementioned surface high continues east, allowing steady on-shore return flow to develop. Resulting moisture will keep overnight lows much warmer and allow some advection fog to develop. Into Thursday, the increased low-level warm, moist air will help to develop spotty showers across the region. The general environment will continue through Friday, as the next storm system begins to develop across the Western Plains. During the late Friday into Saturday morning period, forecast model guidance shows a negatively tilted trough moving across the Mid-Mississippi River Valley, which would create a strong surface low pressure over Missouri or Arkansas. At this time, the position of the surface low well north of the local area would mean more favorable wind profiles for severe weather are likely to remain north as well. Of course, it is too early to lay out specific details and a risk for strong to severe thunderstorms still exists, especially if the low tracks farther south or activity sparks a bit sooner while the upper levels are more favorable.

Currently, the Storm Prediction Center highlights the greatest chance for severe weather just north of the Baton Rouge area. However, the entire local area has been placed in a 1/5 “marginal risk” for severe weather, telling us that one or two storms could be strong with damaging winds being the main threat. After this system, there will be a brief break prior to another trough and surface low cutting across the Mid-South. The latest model guidance moves this system a little farther south, which could heighten the possibility of severe weather on that second one early next week.

--Dr. Josh

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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2018 Hurricane Season ends Friday http://www.wbrz.com/news/2018-hurricane-season-ends-friday/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/2018-hurricane-season-ends-friday/ Weather Wed, 28 Nov 2018 11:14:38 AM Chief Meteorologist, Dr. Josh Eachus 2018 Hurricane Season ends Friday

The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season officially concludes on November 30, and will be remembered most for hurricanes Florence and Michael, which caused significant damage in the southeastern U.S. In total, the season produced 15 named storms, including eight hurricanes of which two were “major” (Category 3, 4 or 5). An average season has 12 named storms, six hurricanes, and three major hurricanes.

For the first season, forecasts were aided by the high-resolution imagery from NOAA’s new GOES-East satellite (GOES-16), and the American Global Forecast System (GFS) model, which produced accurate forecasts of landfall location and timing for both hurricane Florence and Michael. NOAA’s hurricane hunter aircraft flew more than 580 hours this season and provided valuable data in support of forecasting, research and emergency response.

This aerial image shows extensive damage along the coast in Mexico Beach, Florida, caused by Hurricane Michael. NOAA's National Geodetic Survey began collecting damage assessment imagery in the aftermath of the storm October 11, 2018. (NOAA NGS)

For the fourth consecutive year, hurricane activity began prior to the official June 1st start of the season, with Tropical Storm Alberto forming on May 25. Alberto made landfall in northern Florida and traveled as far north as the Great Lakes as a tropical depression.

A record seven named storms (Alberto, Beryl, Debby, Ernesto, Joyce, Leslie and Oscar) were classified as subtropical at some point. The previous record of five subtropical storms occurred in 1969. A subtropical storm is a named storm that has tropical and non-tropical characteristics. All subtropical storms this season eventually transitioned into a tropical storm, with three (Beryl, Leslie and Oscar) eventually becoming hurricanes. Above average water temperatures in the North Atlantic were a primary factor in this added activity.

The 2018 hurricane season was the first since 2008 to have four named storms active at the same time (Florence, Helene, Isaac and Joyce). Hurricane Florence caused catastrophic flooding in portions of North and South Carolina. Several river forecast locations in the Carolinas approached or broke their record flood level in the days and weeks following the hurricane. It took two to three weeks for many river locations to fall below flood stage, and the final river crested one month after Florence made landfall. 53 deaths were attributed to the storm and initial damage estimates are near $16 billion, making it one of the top 15 costliest storms on record.

Hurricane Michael, at Category 4 intensity, was the strongest hurricane on record to strike the Florida panhandle. It was the third-most-intense hurricane to make landfall in the continental U.S. on record in terms of central pressure (919 mb) and the fourth-strongest in terms of maximum sustained winds (155 mph). The death toll related to this storm is at 60 with just under $15 billion in estimated damages, which would also place this storm in the top 15 costliest

“The 2018 season fell within NOAA’s predicted ranges in our pre-season outlook issued in late May. However, the overall season was more active than predicted in the updated outlook issued in early August,” said Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center. “Warmer Atlantic Ocean temperatures, a stronger west-African monsoon and the fact that El Nino did not form in time to suppress the season helped to enhance storm development.”   

With lessons learned from the 2018 hurricane season still fresh in memory, now is the time to make note of ways to improve family hurricane plans for next year. The 2019 hurricane season will officially begin on June 1 and with initial predictions and preparedness beginning in April and May. 

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Gradual warming, returning showers by late week http://www.wbrz.com/news/gradual-warming-returning-showers-by-late-week/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/gradual-warming-returning-showers-by-late-week/ Weather Tue, 27 Nov 2018 5:48:53 AM Chief Meteorologist, Dr. Josh Eachus Gradual warming, returning showers by late week

A gradual warming trend in highs and lows can be expected through the week. A storm system is being monitored for impact weather in the Friday to Saturday timeframe.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: Plenty of sunshine will allow afternoon temperatures to warm about 20 degrees into the mid 50s. Winds will be considerably lighter than Monday. Clear skies will continue overnight and most neighborhoods should remain above freezing with exceptions in southwest Mississippi and possibly neighboring parishes.

Up Next: A surface high will move from Louisiana to Mississippi by Thursday allowing for clear skies and gradual warming. Temperatures will break into the 60s on Wednesday, and then into the 70s on Thursday ahead of a frontal system. Winds will shift from northwest to the southwest, helping to increase dew points and instability beginning Thursday. As that system crosses the area Friday and into Saturday, parameters could be favorable for strong to severe thunderstorms, so stay in touch with the forecast.

The Tropics: With the official hurricane season ending this week, all is quiet. No development is expected in the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea or Atlantic Ocean.

THE EXPLANATION:

Some moisture in the upper levels of the atmosphere, seen easily on the water vapor imagery Tuesday morning, may spread thin cirrus clouds across the area during the afternoon but sun is still expected to be the dominant feature. A surface high will build overhead through Wednesday morning allowing for another chilly night. Thanks to the high, the area will remain calm and clear on Wednesday with high temperatures moderating into the low 60s. Thursday through late week, the aforementioned surface high continues east, allowing for a steady on-shore return flow to develop. Increased low-level warm, moist air will help to develop spotty showers across the region. The general environment will continue through Friday, as the next storm system begins to develop across the Western Plains. During the late Friday into Saturday morning period, forecast model guidance shows a negatively tilted trough moving across the Mid-Mississippi River Valley, which would create a strong surface low pressure over Missouri or Arkansas. At this time, the position of the surface low well north of the local area would mean more favorable wind profiles for severe weather are likely to remain north as well. Of course, it is too early to lay out specific details and a risk for strong to severe thunderstorms still exists, especially if the low tracks farther south or activity sparks a bit sooner while the upper levels are more favorable.

Currently, the Storm Prediction Center highlights the greatest chance for severe weather just north of the Baton Rouge area. After this system, there will be a brief break prior to another trough and surface low cutting across the Mid-South. The latest model guidance moves this system a little farther south, which could heighten the possibility of severe weather on that second one early next week.

--Dr. Josh

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Freeze possible overnight, moderating temps to follow http://www.wbrz.com/news/freeze-possible-overnight-moderating-temps-to-follow/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/freeze-possible-overnight-moderating-temps-to-follow/ Weather Mon, 26 Nov 2018 6:19:24 AM Chief Meteorologist, Dr. Josh Eachus Freeze possible overnight, moderating temps to follow

Cool and quiet weather will last through mid-week. A quick turnaround though will have mild temperatures and storms back by the weekend.

THE FORECAST:

Today and Tonight: High pressure behind the front that passed on Sunday will provide clearing skies and much cooler temperatures. Highs confined to the mid 50s, as the northwest wind of 10mph continues. Overnight will be clear and cold.

A FREEZE WARNING is in effect from 12am – 8am Tuesday for East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge, Livingston, Tangipahoa, Pointe Coupee, East Feliciana, West Feliciana, and St. Helena Parishes as well as Wilkinson, Amite and Pike Counties. Temperatures are expected to reach 32 or lower across most of the warning area for two to five hours. Sensitive vegetation could be damaged. Wind chill values in the mid to upper 20s will impact those outside for prolonged periods overnight tonight. Be sure people and pets have access to warmth and cover or relocate non-hardy plants.

Up Next: The surface high will move from Texas to Mississippi between Tuesday and Thursday allowing for clear skies and gradual warming. Temperatures will break into the 60s on Wednesday, and then into the 70s on Thursday ahead of a frontal system. Winds will shift from northwest to the southwest, helping to increase dew points and rain chances beginning Thursday. As that system crosses the area Friday and Saturday, parameters could be favorable for strong to severe thunderstorms, so stay in touch with the forecast.

The Tropics: With just under one week left in the official hurricane season, all is quiet. No development is expected in the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea or Atlantic Ocean.

THE EXPLANATION:

Into early Tuesday, most low to mid-level moisture and associated clouds will press east with a strong as a surface high builds into the lower Mississippi River Valley. Clear skies and calm winds will help temperatures plummet into the lower 30s along and north of the I-10/12 corridor early Tuesday morning. Widespread frost will be likely with temperatures at or below freezing for 2-5 in these areas. By midday Tuesday through Thursday, we begin a slow moderation of thermometers while remaining dry and calm. Focus will then shift to the next potential significant storm system developing across the Central U.S. late this week and into the weekend. Some forecast model guidance suggests rain and severe thunderstorm event in the region by Friday or Saturday. As usual, details will become more lucid as we get into the middle part of the week. Beyond this timeframe, there is no strong signal for a significant cool down, so seasonable to mild temperatures will likely continue.

--Dr. Josh

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, wbrz.com, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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A Chilly Start to the Week http://www.wbrz.com/news/a-chilly-start-to-the-week/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/a-chilly-start-to-the-week/ Weather Sun, 25 Nov 2018 5:15:40 PM Meteorologist Matt Callihan A Chilly Start to the Week

THE FORECAST: 

Tonight and Tomorrow: Showers continuing to taper off through the evening, but mostly cloudy skies will stay overhead. After the cold front passes around 6 PM, temperatures will drop swiftly, eventually reaching around 42° for an overnight low. Winds will also be elevated out of the northwest between 10 and 15 mph, which will also be the case through the day on Monday. Sunny skies to start off the workweek, but cool conditions. Highs will stay confined to around 55°, with winds slowing down as we proceed into the evening hours.  

 

Up Next:  Sunny and cool through the start of the workweek, allowing for low temperatures Monday night and Tuesday morning to hover around freezing. Temperatures will slowly warm through the week, but lows will also drop into the mid-30s Tuesday night as well. Showers return through the end of the week and into the weekend, with strong storms possible on Saturday. Highs will continue to climb into the 60s on Wednesday, and into the 70s on Thursday.    

 

The Tropics: A low pressure system located just south of Bermuda is forecast to become a powerful non-tropical cyclone later today. Conditions are not expected to be conducive for subtropical development while the low moves quickly east-northeastward during the next few days. Although subtropical development is not anticipated, the system is expected to produce gale-force winds over portions of the western Atlantic and near Bermuda today. The low is then forecast to intensify further and could produce winds up to hurricane-force over portions of the central Atlantic by Tuesday. The National Hurricane Center is forecasting a 0% chance of tropical development within the next 5 days.

 

 

THE EXPLANATION:

Strong area of high pressure that extends into the Dakotas will sit in behind the front on Monday, allowing for clear skies and cooler temperatures. This high pressure will stay the dominate feature in the area through the beginning part of the week, and will meander south and dip into the Gulf on Wednesday. This will help to increase temperatures through the midweek, as an approaching frontal system to the west bumps highs back into the 70s on Thursday. Pre-frontal showers will be possible as moisture is pushed onshore Thursday and Friday, before the main front passes through on Saturday. This front is rather stout, as we could experience some strong to severe storms on Saturday. Mostly sunny skies should return on Sunday, with highs staying in the mid-70s.

 

--Meteorologist Matt Callihan

The WBRZ Weather Team is here for you, on every platform. Your weather updates can be found on News 2, and the WBRZ WX App. on Apple and Android devices. Follow WBRZ Weather on Facebook and Twitter for even more weather updates while you are on the go.


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Showers Incoming for Sunday http://www.wbrz.com/news/showers-incoming-for-sunday/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/showers-incoming-for-sunday/ Weather Sat, 24 Nov 2018 6:57:54 PM Meteorologist Matt Callihan Showers Incoming for Sunday

THE FORECAST: 

Tonight and Tomorrow: Clouds are continuing to increase as we head into the evening and overnight hours, as winds begin to shift out of the south. Cloud cover and southerly winds will set up a mild night ahead, with lows only dipping down near 55°. These changes are ahead of an approaching warm front from the south, and a cold front from the west. The warm front will approach the coast around 5 AM, with the cold front following later in the morning. Both of these systems will increase rain chances heading into Sunday, with rain tapering off through the late afternoon.

 

Up Next:  Two systems moving in tomorrow, providing area of showers through much of the day. The last line of showers are set to pass through around 4 PM, with drier conditions afterward. Sunny skies return as we proceed into the workweek, but cold conditions will also be present. Lows will hover near freezing Monday and Tuesday nights.    

 

The Tropics: A low pressure system located over the western Atlantic about 300 miles southwest of Bermuda is forecast to become a powerful non-tropical cyclone later on Sunday. Conditions are not expected to be conducive for subtropical development while the low moves quickly northeastward to east-northeastward during the next few days. Although subtropical development is not anticipated, the system is expected to produce gale-force winds over portions of the western Atlantic and near Bermuda later Sunday. The low is then forecast to intensify further and could produce winds up to hurricane-force over portions of the Central Atlantic by early next week. The National Hurricane is forecasting a 0% chance of tropical development within the next 5 days.

 

 

THE EXPLANATION:

There is currently a localized high pressure over Grand Isle, which will help to keep relatively dry air in the region. This high will also help to break up an approaching warm front from our south that will be moving onshore early Sunday morning. A cold front to our west will also be digging through Texas and breaking through Louisiana late in the morning into the early afternoon, helping to elevate shower chances and bring the potential for an isolated storm near and east of the I-55 corridor. Strong high pressure will sit it Sunday evening, and linger through the beginning part of the workweek in order to keep skies sunny. This high is originating from the Dakotas, and will also bring with it very cold conditions Monday and Tuesday. Temperatures will steadily increase through the week, as the high departs to the east, and an approaching frontal system from the west shifts winds out of the south ahead of its arrival. This system is rather robust, and could provide strong to severe storms Friday and Saturday.

 

--Meteorologist Matt Callihan

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