WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Weather Weather en-us Copyright 2014, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Fri, 31 Oct 2014 09:10:08 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Part 2: Tropical Ohio? http://www.wbrz.com/news/part-2-tropical-ohio-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/part-2-tropical-ohio-/ Weather Thu, 30 Oct 2014 8:24:15 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Part 2: Tropical Ohio?

Not often does one go from fall, to summer, to wintry (and tropical?) weather in less than ten days' time. Then again, not every autumn has a storm like October of 2012.

Saturday, October 20: I had left behind the crisp fall air of Eastern Ohio for Sanibel Island, Florida-there celebrating a family member's marriage. Though away from work, ever-connected and thumbing through my Twitter feed that afternoon, I came across a ‘retweet' from my college meteorology professor. A national forecaster was simply pointing out a seemingly outlandish computer model suggestion of an early season Nor'easter more than 10 days out. As an aside, the word "Nor'easter" elicits a reaction out of northerners not unlike that of a southern who has just heard the word hurricane-adjust seat and listen carefully. Studious to my science, I was initially dismissive about an unreliable ten day model forecast. My suspicions were farther raised by that fact that if a Nor'easter were to form, it would be almost three weeks ahead of what would be considered the "normal time of year" for such an event. Later that night, before going to sleep, I caught a local news station's story on Hurricane Sandy churning through the Caribbean.

Little did I or anyone else realize at the time, that days later the fairyland social media Nor'easter and Hurricane Sandy would in fact be the same beast!

Wednesday, October 24: Now home from tropical paradise, resuming my forecasting duties and more connected to a rapidly evolving forecast, trends were growing clearer. Early computer model runs were not identifying a Nor'easter, rather a hurricane merging with the northern branch of the jet stream and impacting the Northeastern United States. While forecast models were consistent in showing this solution, and beginning to agree with each other over the outcome, the forecast was difficult to believe due to the unprecedented left hook or westward curve into shore that would need to occur.

Friday, October 26: Now, only three days prior to the expected landfall, a morphing "Superstorm" Sandy was no longer heresy, rather an imminent threat to life and property targeting the Northeastern Metropolis. Even the least aggressive computer model solutions denoted impacts as far west as Ohio and as far south as Kentucky. Based on the Ohio/West Virginia/Pennsylvania border, our television station began preparing for extensive storm coverage.

Monday, October 29: To provide some perspective, around Halloween, Ohioans are normally enjoying fall weather with changing leaves and crisp temperatures that range from the upper 50s by day to the upper 30s at night. However on that day, thermometers were struggling for 50°, a steady patter of rain had begun and breezes from a storm system centered more than 300 miles away were sending fall foliage into clogging storm drains. Overnight, while the local threat for any significant harm was low, Sandy made for a miserable time in the Ohio Valley.

Tuesday, October 30: By 5am, I found myself bundled for a snowstorm, standing in a moderate rain, with nearly tropical storm force wind gusts and temperatures hovering around 40°. Less than 100 miles to my southeast, over a foot of heavy, wet snow was crippling the hilly countryside of Northern West Virginia. Reading that last sentence again-yes, the West Virginia countryside was lambasted with snow produced by a storm of tropical origin!

Click here (scroll to bottom left) to view my live report during "Superstorm" Sandy on that morning.

No question, I personally did not experience the worst of Hurricane Sandy. That was reserved for folks living on the East Coast, specifically New Jersey and New York.

The circumstances are astounding to reflect upon however. If you told anyone that you were going to spend some time in both Florida and Ohio on a given October day, the Buckeye State is likely not the one in which you'd be told to "watch out for hurricanes that time of year."

On Friday, Meteorologist Josh Eachus examines the communications nightmare created by the extremely rare storm, and how the forecast may have only exasperated problems in the Northeast.

You can get forecasts from Meteorologist Josh Eachus weekdays on 2une-In from 5-7am and News 2 at Noon from 12-1pm. Additionally, you can get the fastest and latest forecasts and weather news by checking in with wbrz.com/weather, connecting with Josh on Google+ and following him on Twitter.


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More chilling http://www.wbrz.com/news/more-chilling/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/more-chilling/ Weather Thu, 30 Oct 2014 4:20:45 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus More chilling

A much clearer and cooler start than Wednesday will lead to likewise results for the afternoon. A mostly sunny sky will prevail with highs staying in the middle 70s.

Overnight will be chilly with lows dipping to nearly 50° beneath clear skies.

Halloween and the first weekend of November will be ‘chilling.' Though clear skies are anticipated, make sure those costumes are secured as northerly breezes of 10-15mph will be ushering in much cooler temperatures. Thermometer readings will quickly tumble as the trick-or-treaters head out on Friday Night. The bottom out readings both weekend mornings will flirt with the upper 30s, but at the very least, get into the low 40s. Afternoon highs this weekend will stay in the middle 60s.

 


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Part 1: Super destructive http://www.wbrz.com/news/part-1-super-destructive/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/part-1-super-destructive/ Weather Wed, 29 Oct 2014 9:21:08 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Part 1: Super destructive

Two years ago to the day, a rare Northeastern United States Post-Tropical Cyclone made landfall just north of Atlantic City New Jersey.

Deemed "Superstorm" Sandy, the complex system caused 72 fatalities, the highest death tally outside of the Southern United States since Hurricane Agnes in 1972.

Worldwide, Sandy was also the second costliest natural disaster of the last four decades-number two behind only Hurricane Katrina. After a remarkable northwestern curve into the Eastern Seaboard, the geographically massive system drove a catastrophic storm surge into Coastal New Jersey and New York. Damage estimates exceeded $50 billion.

According to the World Meteorological Organization, Katrina nearly tripled Sandy, causing $147 billion in damages. Rounding out the top 5 were Hurricane Andrew, the China flood of 1998 and the Thailand flood of 2011.

According to World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General, Michel Jarraud, "The escalating impact of disasters is due not only to their increasing frequency and severity but also to the growing vulnerability of human societies, especially those surviving on the margins of development."

From 1970 to 2012, 8,835 weather, climate and water related disasters were reported worldwide. All told, these events were responsible for a staggering 1.94 million fatalities and $2.4 trillion (U.S. dollars) in economic losses.

The top ten costliest events were only responsible for 0.1 percent of the total deaths but 69 percent of the total economic loss.

Storms and floods accounted for 79 percent of the total number of disasters. Droughts, water and climate extremes accounted for the remaining events.

Most of the deadliest disasters occurred in undeveloped countries, while the costliest were in developed countries.

On Thursday, in part two of our Hurricane Sandy series, Meteorologist Josh Eachus will provide a personal perspective on the storm.

You can get forecasts from Meteorologist Josh Eachus weekdays on 2une-In from 5-7am and News 2 at Noon from 12-1pm. Additionally, you can get the fastest and latest forecasts and weather news by checking in with wbrz.com/weather, connecting with Josh on Google+ and following him on Twitter.


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Small shot at rain http://www.wbrz.com/news/small-shot-at-rain/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/small-shot-at-rain/ Weather Wed, 29 Oct 2014 3:50:01 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Small shot at rain

15 days dry and counting...

Expect one more day of isolated shower chances before cooler and drier days lead into the weekend.

Morning fog will dissipate to a mostly cloudy sky into the afternoon hours. A couple of showers will be possible as highs top out near 80° early. By late afternoon, skies should tend to clear from north to south with drier air working into the region during the evening.

Overnight, under mostly clear skies, thermometers will quickly cool through the 60s and bottom out in the mid-50s.

 

 


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Two weeks dry http://www.wbrz.com/news/two-weeks-dry/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/two-weeks-dry/ Weather Tue, 28 Oct 2014 4:01:23 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Two weeks dry

Monday marked an even two weeks with no recorded rain where records are kept at Baton Rouge Metro Airport.

If a shower is to be picked up over the region, it will occur in the next two days.

An indicator of added moisture, Tuesday Morning fog will dissipate to a partly sunny afternoon. Especially where there is slightly more humidity near the coast, a spotty afternoon shower may pop up. Highs will again return to the middle 80s.

The overnight hours will maintain the possibility for isolated showers, fog and mostly cloudy skies with thermometers in the middle 60s.

 


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You might be addicted http://www.wbrz.com/news/you-might-be-addicted/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/you-might-be-addicted/ Weather Mon, 27 Oct 2014 7:27:15 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus You might be addicted

Do you wish WBRZ's 7-day forecast always looked like that? If so, it is possible you have a bit of a problem.

Monday marks 14 straight days of no precipitation and predominantly sunny days. With most of Southeastern Louisiana and Southern Mississippi still having a rain surplus for the year, how could that possibly present an issue?

The sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays can stimulate indicators of addiction just like recreational drugs, according to a study done at Massachusetts General Hospital.

A person being addicted to UV-radiation is not actually a groundbreaking discovery. Previous studies have shown the possibility of addiction in habitual sun-tanners. However, findings in the mechanisms behind the process are new.

Skin smooching UV rays release endorphins, which trigger receptors and signals in your brain. Researchers hypothesized that these signals may explain addictive behavior, not unlike how drugs create a short-lived sense of well-being or a high.

With the hypothesis, came the need for testing. Mice were exposed to UV rays for 5 days a week, over 6 weeks-an amount congruent to 20-30 minutes of midday sun exposure for a person. Then, researchers wanted to identify any potential withdrawal symptoms if endorphins in the mice were blocked with drugs. The rodents experienced shaking and teeth chattering. The withdrawal was serious enough to change behavior in the mice-despite having an affinity for dark environments, when given the choice, the mice ventured towards a well-lit box. Like an addictive drug, when mice weren't getting UV exposure, they chased after it.

Of course, an experiment conducted with mice means much more work is needed to determine the exact human impact.
The study's lead scientist suggests that because UV light triggers the skin to produce vitamin D, humans may have evolved to find ultraviolet rays pleasing. This possible "sun addiction," might explain why some people choose to go tanning or use tanning enhancers in the sun, despite the known health risks.

In the meantime, if you happen to be enjoying the bright, tranquil weather safely, with sunscreen, and aren't terribly thrown off by a rainy day spent indoors; chances are U/V addiction isn't a concern.

You can get forecasts from Meteorologist Josh Eachus weekdays on 2une-In from 5-7am and News 2 at Noon from 12-1pm. Additionally, you can get the fastest and latest forecasts and weather news by checking in with wbrz.com/weather, liking Josh on Facebook and following him on Twitter.

 


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Last week of October http://www.wbrz.com/news/last-week-of-october/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/last-week-of-october/ Weather Mon, 27 Oct 2014 4:04:15 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Last week of October

Your Monday will be dry but warm with mostly sunny skies and highs in the middle 80s. A touch of humidity will be felt during the afternoon hours as well as south-southeasterly winds of 5-10mph transport some low level moisture northwards.

During the overnight hours, lows will keep to the lower and middle 60s, and though skies will be mostly clear, some fog can be expected into Tuesday Morning.

 


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No major U.S. hurricane landfall in nine years; longest in recorded history http://www.wbrz.com/news/no-major-u-s-hurricane-landfall-in-nine-years-longest-in-recorded-history/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/no-major-u-s-hurricane-landfall-in-nine-years-longest-in-recorded-history/ Weather Fri, 24 Oct 2014 6:48:15 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III No major U.S. hurricane landfall in nine years; longest in recorded history

Following an extremely active hurricane season in 2005, the US has experienced quite a dry spell in major hurricane landfalls. While there have been some significant landfalls including Gustav, Ike, Isaac and Sandy, the United States has not experienced a major hurricane (category 3+) landfall since Wilma hit Florida on October 24th, 2005. According to data from the Hurricane Research Division of the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, this is the longest stretch of time in recorded meteorological history in which the US has not experienced a major hurricane landfall.

It's rare to reach the "W" tag on the annual list of hurricane names. The fact that Wilma reached category 5 strength is even less common. In fact, Wilma is the only retired "W" name.

Many expected the 2005 season to be the new "norm," but as recent history has shown, it is hard to predict exactly what a hurricane season will yield. Hurricane Season 2005 brought us 28 storms. When considering the Accumulated Cyclone Energy Index (ACE), the only other season comparable to 2005 was 1933, which included 20 storms, six of which were major hurricanes. The 2005 season is ranked second behind 1933 when the considering the ACE.

Throughout recorded meteorological history, there has been a cyclical pattern of active and quiet periods. We also see a cyclical pattern in spatial distribution. An academic article in the American Meteorological Society's Journal of Climate by Louisiana State Climatologist Barry Keim et al. shows return periods for tropical storms and hurricanes from Texas to Maine. Not only does it show spatial distribution of tropical systems from 1901 to 2005, but also return periods of tropical systems, including return periods of major hurricanes.

In the included image from the article, one can see an increase in major hurricanes in the 1920s through the 1960s, alternating from Gulf Coast landfalls, to East Coast landfalls. Activity simmered down a bit from the late 1960s until the late 90s into the early 00s where tropical activity picked up again. It may have been relatively quiet from the 60s to the 90s, but it does not compare to the current nine year void in major landfalls.

We all know that it only takes one storm classify the year as a "bad" one, but hopefully, a 10 year stretch without a major hurricane landfall is in the making.

Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III is the weekend meteorologist and a current graduate student of climatology at Louisiana State University. You can see his forecasts on Saturday and Sunday evenings. You can like him on Facebook and also follow him on Twitter; also available in español.


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Enjoy the weekend!! http://www.wbrz.com/news/enjoy-the-weekend-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/enjoy-the-weekend-/ Weather Fri, 24 Oct 2014 4:10:11 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III Enjoy the weekend!!

You can expect a beautiful forecast today! Expect a chillier start with most areas in the 40s. It's possible for a few areas to reach 80 but most of us will stay in the 70s. The nighttime hours will be clear and a bit warmer, with most of us in the lower 50s. This weekend is also fantastic, whether you're celebrating homecoming, or just going camping, the weather will fully cooperate so enjoy it! Temperatures are a little below average now, but we should be about average for the weekend.

There's a little of a bit better chance for some spotty showers next week. We will have a little more moisture, and the possibility of a cold front which may help spin up a shower or two potentially; it's not out of the question.

The Tropics

The National Hurricane Center has become interested again in what is left of Tropical Depression 9. As it exits the Yucatan, they tend to believe that there's a slight chance of development; about a 10% in the next 2 days. Otherwise, the tropics are quiet.

 

On Facebook: Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III

On Twitter: RG3wbrz

 

~RG3

 

 


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Chilly starts ahead http://www.wbrz.com/news/chilly-starts-ahead/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/chilly-starts-ahead/ Weather Thu, 23 Oct 2014 4:03:58 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III Chilly starts ahead

We're still dry and sunny. We're even a little cooler today. We should all stay out of the 80s this afternoon, reaching temperatures only in the upper 70s. The nighttime hours will be clear and a bit cooler, with most of us in the upper 40s. There are a few clouds and showers in east Texas this morning, but as they make their way toward us, they should dry up and evaporate because of the lack of humidity here. This weekend is fantastic, whether you're celebrating homecoming, or just going camping, just do it. The weather will be wonderful. Temperatures are a little below average now, but we should be about average for the weekend.

We're looking at dry conditions potentially into November, which will continue our longest dry spell of the year. Thankfully, we still have a little rain surplus in Baton Rouge.

The Tropics

Tropical Depression Nine has become more of a remnant low as it moves over the Yucatan. It's not even being officially recognized by the National Hurricane Center anymore. The Caribbean is a little stormy at the moment, but we aren't worried about any tropical development within the next few days.

 

On Facebook: Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III

On Twitter: RG3wbrz

 

~RG3

 

 


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Categories change, risks remain http://www.wbrz.com/news/categories-change-risks-remain/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/categories-change-risks-remain/ Weather Wed, 22 Oct 2014 2:40:41 PM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Categories change, risks remain

Effective Wednesday, the National Weather Service (NWS) Storm Prediction Center (SPC) is making some significant changes to their "severe weather outlooks".

When severe weather is expected, you may hear local forecasters describing a slight, moderate or high risk of severe weather. Along with an ambiguous and dismissible "see text" category, the old terminology will be migrated to the following levels:

1.Marginal (new)
2.Slight
3.Enhanced (new)
4.Moderate
5.High

The SPC has made these changes in an effort to "bring better consistency to the risks communicated in SPC outlooks," per feedback received from consumers of SPC information and the social science community. As an example, in the retired format, a 10% tornado probability, including the threat for a significant tornado, was considered a slight risk-in the same category for a 15% chance of severe wind or hail event. Now, that tornado threat would be considered an enhanced risk for severe weather.

Do those subtle differences in hazard chance or type of hazard really mean anything to most people? Probably not, because tornado, wind or hail all still pose a real threat to life and property.

Moreover, do the words chosen for the updated categories carry the intended message? Will most consumers really be able to decipher and take appropriate action based the extreme difference in danger between a marginal and high risk? Unlikely.

So, why didn't the SPC explore a more drastic, mass-appealing means of communicating these hazards? Here is the response given on their webpage:

"The categorical words Slight, Moderate and High have been used by SPC for nearly 35 years and are generally understood by the weather risk communication community. Making measured changes to the current system, we believe, is more effective than a wholesale change. These measured changes include: 1) moving to de-emphasize the specific words; and 2) working to communicate the level of risk to the public in multiple ways. This includes numerical risk categorization, appropriate colors to indicate severity, and strategic use of icons and symbols. Social scientists have encouraged us to communicate on multiple levels and not just with a single word, label or category."

"Generally understood by the weather risk communication community," is the key phrase to the SPC's entire explanation. Forecasters, communicators, translators and protectors, broadcast meteorologists importance is again underscored by the updated severe weather outlooks. At the forefront of these outlooks as they are issued, it remains the duty of television, radio and internet meteorologists to interpret severe weather risks, give meaning to these weather categorizing words and, most importantly, highlight direct impacts that may be experienced by local viewers.

None of this to contrive ill-will for the hard-working, life-saving and brilliant meteorologists serving our nation at the SPC. For meteorologists, these changes are welcomed, refreshing and provide great clarity in life-threatening, dynamic weather situations.

However, for use as a public severe weather communications tool, the SPC outlooks still have a long way to go.

For more on the SPC's changed severe weather outlooks, click here.

You can get forecasts from Meteorologist Josh Eachus weekdays on 2une-In from 5-7 a.m. and News 2 at Noon from 12-1 p.m. Additionally, you can get the fastest and latest forecasts and weather news by checking in with wbrz.com/weather, connecting with Josh on Google+ and following him on Twitter.


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Meaux Sunshine http://www.wbrz.com/news/meaux-sunshine/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/meaux-sunshine/ Weather Wed, 22 Oct 2014 3:58:46 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III Meaux Sunshine

Don't expect a big chance in the forecast over the next several days. More sunshine and cool, dry conditions. Expect high temperatures to top out in the lower 80s beneath a mainly sunny sky. The nighttime hours will be clear and a bit cooler, especially in our northern areas. A weak cold front moves through today and it's too dry to spin up any showers, or even many clouds, but it will knock down our temperatures a few degrees. You'll really feel it in the next few mornings with some upper 40's possible in some places. Expect slightly below average highs and lows through Saturday as a broad high pressure system in the Mid-Atlantic maintains tranquility into the weekend.

We're looking at dry conditions potentially into November, which will continue our longest dry spell of the year. Thankfully, we still have a little rain surplus in Baton Rouge.

The Tropics

Tropical Depression Nine has formed in the Bay of Campeche. It's experiencing a little wind shear at the moment, this is expected to let up a bit, protentially helping this system develop into a tropical storm. Most models are taking this system over the Yucatan. This is a small storm, so as it passes over the high terrain of the Yucatan Peninsula, it's going to have a little trouble staying together. We're not too worried about this. Water temperatures, especially north toward our coast, are on the cool side. If we see tropical development in October, it usually closer to home and not far into the Atlantic.

On Facebook: Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III

On Twitter: RG3wbrz

 

~RG3

 


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Tranquil, Unchanging http://www.wbrz.com/news/tranquil-unchanging/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/tranquil-unchanging/ Weather Tue, 21 Oct 2014 4:16:01 AM Keller Watts Tranquil, Unchanging

Tranquil, unchanging

Little change can be expected in the weather over the next several days.

Forecast Discussion: A weak cold front will cross the Gulf South Tuesday Night. This system has virtually no moisture in place that would aid in the development of any showers or even a thick cloud deck for that matter. Once this front seeps into the Gulf, a reinforcing cool and dry northerly breeze will take hold for the remainder of the week. Expect slightly below average highs and lows through Saturday as a broad high pressure system in the Mid-Atlantic maintains tranquility into the weekend.

Today and Tonight: Like Monday, expect high temperatures to top out in the low 80s beneath a mainly sunny sky. The nighttime hours will be clear and just a touch less cool with lows in the mid to upper 0s.

Looking Ahead: Beyond a minor cold front on Wednesday, highs will be in the upper 70s with lows in the lower 50s for the rest of the week. Abundant afternoon sunshine will be carried into the weekend. Humidity will remain low.

The Tropics: From the National Hurricane Center

Showers and thunderstorms associated with an area of low pressurelocated over the southwestern Bay of Campeche are currently limited. This system still has the potential to become a tropical cyclone during the next couple of days while it moves slowly eastward across
the southern Bay of Campeche. Later in the week, the low is forecastto interact and possibly merge with a frontal system over thesoutheastern Gulf of Mexico or northwestern Caribbean Sea. An AirForce Reserve reconnaissance aircraft is scheduled to investigate
the disturbance this afternoon, if necessary. Interests in theYucatan Peninsula should monitor the progress of this system.

--Keller

 


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Tranquil days ahead http://www.wbrz.com/news/tranquil-days-ahead/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/tranquil-days-ahead/ Weather Mon, 20 Oct 2014 4:14:51 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Tranquil days ahead

Another week of quiet weather is ahead.

Look for plenty of sunshine and just a few passing clouds while temperatures head for the 80° mark. Overnight will be clear and quiet with lows dipping into the mid-50s.

Checking the tropics, there is an area of shower and thunderstorm activity in the Bay of Campeche that remains disorganized as of Monday Morning. With lower water temperatures and a harsher environment overall, this system is only given a 30% chance of development over the next 5 days as it drifts east-northeast. A frontal boundary falling into the Gulf should shunt the system to the east and away from Louisiana through this week.

Get a more detailed forecast in our weather blog right here: http://www.wbrz.com/weather-blog/ or from Meteorologist Josh Eachus on Twitter, Google+ and Facebook.


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Still dry, but a bit warmer http://www.wbrz.com/news/still-dry-but-a-bit-warmer/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/still-dry-but-a-bit-warmer/ Weather Fri, 17 Oct 2014 4:08:59 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III Still dry, but a bit warmer

While warmth will be on the rise, humidity will remain well below oppressive levels.

Forecast Discussion: The surface high pressure that has brought about tranquil weather over the last several days will chug toward the Florida Coast today. Resulting will be a bit of a southerly component to the local winds and thermometers will respond with the warmest day expected over the next several. By Saturday Morning, a cold front will be approaching from the north. This weak front will not have much moisture to tap into and thus rain showers are not expected, rather just an uptick in cloud coverage. On the other side of the front, Sunday through Wednesday, the region will experience dry and temperate weather.

Today and Tonight: Today we can expect to post our warmest high temperature over the next several days. Thermometers will top out around 85° with plenty of afternoon sunshine. Overnight lows will also be at their highest for the week ahead, dropping to only the lower 60s. Skies may reveal a passing cloud or two.

The Weekend: Partly sunny skies will be observed Saturday as a dry cold front works through the region. Temperatures will be similar to Friday but perhaps a touch lower due to added clouds and a northerly shifting breeze. Sunday will be mostly sunny and likely the cooler of the two days. Overall though, little sensible change is expected in the weather right into the middle of next week.

The Tropics: Hurricane Gonzalo is a category 4 storm about to bring a lot of rain and wind to Bermuda. Luckily for us, it is staying well away from the continental United States. It is picking up speed as it is being picked up by an upper level trough off the east coast. It will quickly move toward the NE and potentially scrape by Newfoundland as a tropical storm. The last time we saw a major hurricane make landfall in the US, was in 2005 with Wilma, 9 years ago this month.

 

On Facebook: Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III

On Twitter: @RG3wbrz

 

--RG3

 


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Warming, Gonzalo becomes major storm http://www.wbrz.com/news/warming-gonzalo-becomes-major-storm/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/warming-gonzalo-becomes-major-storm/ Weather Thu, 16 Oct 2014 3:48:28 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Warming, Gonzalo becomes major storm

After a cool morning, temperatures will begin returning to average.

If you wear a jacket during the chilly morning hours, you will be able to shed it by the afternoon as sunshine will move thermometers into the lower 80s. The overnight hours will be clear but not quite as cool with a low temperature in the upper 50s.

Hurricane Gonzalo is the Atlantic Basin's first major hurricane since Ophelia and Katia in 2011. A powerful storm, as of 4am CDT Thursday, Gonzalo packed winds of 140mph and a minimum central pressure of 945mb. Hurricane warnings are posted for Bermuda as Gonzalo lumbers northward around 10mph towards the island. Beyond impacts to Bermuda on Friday, the storm will accelerate to the north-northeast and out to sea.


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Another tranquil day http://www.wbrz.com/news/another-tranquil-day/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/another-tranquil-day/ Weather Wed, 15 Oct 2014 4:00:39 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Another tranquil day

The Baton Rouge area will notch another cooler than average day. After needing a light jacket early, the afternoon will warm into the middle 70s under plenty of sunshine.

Overnight will be cool and peaceful with lows again stretching for the upper 40s.

Hurricane Gonzalo continues to strengthen in the Central Atlantic Ocean. As of 4am Wednesday, Gonzalo was located about 660 miles south-southwest of Bermuda. Maximum sustained winds were 125mph with a minimum central pressure of 954mb. The storm may briefly strengthen to category four status as it turns to the north and then eventually accelerates by week's end. Hurricane force conditions will be possible over Bermuda on Friday, before the system meets its demise in the Northern Atlantic.

You can get forecasts from Meteorologist Josh Eachus weekdays on 2une-In from 5-7am and News 2 at Noon from 12-1pm. Additionally, you can get the fastest and latest forecasts and weather news by checking in with wbrz.com/weather, connecting with Josh on Google+ and following him on Twitter.


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Hurricane Gonzalo major storm, aims for Bermuda http://www.wbrz.com/news/hurricane-gonzalo-major-storm-aims-for-bermuda/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/hurricane-gonzalo-major-storm-aims-for-bermuda/ Weather Tue, 14 Oct 2014 2:05:53 PM APNewsNow Hurricane Gonzalo major storm, aims for Bermuda

MIAMI - Forecasters say Gonzalo has blown into a major hurricane in the Caribbean, churning up heavy surf as it approaches Bermuda.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami says Gonzalo is a Category 3 hurricane on with top sustained winds of 115 mph (185 kph) as it moved away from the U.S. and British Virgin Islands Tuesday.

Still intensifying, Gonzalo was centered about 770 miles (1,240 kilometers) south of Bermuda and moving northwest at 13 mph (20 kph).

The storm was expected to take a north-northwest turn late Wednesday and move over open waters toward Bermuda through Friday.


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Unsaturated http://www.wbrz.com/news/unsaturated/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/unsaturated/ Weather Tue, 14 Oct 2014 4:18:16 AM Meteorologist Josh Eachus Unsaturated

After spending seven straight days with above average temperatures, including a trio of 90° afternoons, Southeast Louisiana and Southern Mississippi return to more fall-like weather.

Evidence of the cooler, drier air can be found by looking at the low temperature trend over the next five days. Many locations will sneak into the upper 40s on Wednesday and Thursday Mornings.

As for the lower humidity, once again the dew point temperature can be applied to explain. When skies are clear and winds are calm, air temperatures will have a tendency to cool as much as possible. Thermometers can only cool to the temperature at which the air becomes saturated-which is the dew point temperature. Therefore, when forecast lows are in the upper 40s and lower 50s, dew points must be similar or even lower. Recalling the same dew point scale used to describe summer humidity, such readings in the 40s constitute a very dry air mass and a much more comfortable feel outside.

For Tuesday, abundant sunshine is anticipated during the afternoon hours. After a much cooler morning, a much cooler afternoon is ahead as well with highs staying 5-10° below average-in the mid-70s. A crisp morning is in the cards for Wednesday with dawn thermometers near 50° and some upper 40s likely in typical cool spots north of Baton Rouge.

The extended forecast will keep the region dry and below average before a little moderation in thermometers by Thursday Afternoon.

Even as temperatures try and climb above average by the weekend, humidity will not return to an oppressive level.

You can get forecasts from Meteorologist Josh Eachus weekdays on 2une-In from 5-7am and News 2 at Noon from 12-1pm. Additionally, you can get the fastest and latest forecasts and weather news by checking in with wbrz.com/weather, connecting with Josh on Google+ and following him on Twitter.


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Hurricane Gonzalo forms in Caribbean http://www.wbrz.com/news/hurricane-gonzalo-forms-in-caribbean/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/hurricane-gonzalo-forms-in-caribbean/ Weather Mon, 13 Oct 2014 2:00:46 PM APNewsNow Hurricane Gonzalo forms in Caribbean

MIAMI - Forecasters say Hurricane Gonzalo has formed in the eastern Caribbean and its winds are buffeting the island of Antigua, downing trees, knocking out power and tearing roofs from homes.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida, said Monday afternoon that Gonzalo is packing sustained winds of 75 mph (120 kph). Some strengthening is likely.

The storm gained strength as it passed through the Leeward Islands on a track toward the U.S. and British Virgin Islands and to the east of Puerto Rico, now as a hurricane.

As of 5 p.m. EDT (1700 GMT), the center of Gonzalo was about 20 miles (30 kilometers) southeast of St. Martin and 140 miles (230 kilometers) east-southeast of St. Thomas. It is moving toward the northwest at 12 mph (19 kmh).


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