WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2017, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Thu, 23 Mar 2017 04:03:40 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: The Ides and THE Day..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-ides-and-the-day-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-ides-and-the-day-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 14 Mar 2017 10:30:44 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton: The Ides and THE Day...

Beware the Ides of March.  On this date in 1988 a record high and a record low were logged on the same day and at the same place. In Astoria, Oregon, in 1988, the mercury dipped to an overnight low of 28 degrees while later that afternoon the mercury soared to 61, noting a first for the local Weather Service Office that opened in 1951.  In 1936, March 15th found an intense dust storm in southeast Colorado.  Visibilities were less than ten feet with a combination of dust and sand blasting paint from vehicles and damaging windshields. It began a stretch of 22 dust-storm days. Finally, the world’s five day rainfall record was set in Cilaos, Reunion Island in the Indian Ocean.  A tropical cyclone unloaded 151.73 inches of rain. Yours truly was blessed with a marvelous gift this date in 1952. I named this parade, “The Wearin of the Green,” in tribute to its anonymous author during the Irish Rebellion in 1798 and to further the beauty of the color – green. If you can’t join us on the route, join us on WBRZ, Channel 2, and WBRZ.com as we cover the parade and the parade is covered in green. Our coverage begins at at 9:30 AM.  For many years the spectators and participants dodged the rain, cold and flurries. According to our “Killarney Grand Marshals” of the past, the parade day weather often replicates the weather in “The Old Country.”  This has truly turned into a Hammett-Shingleton event with family members shouldering the burden to recognize our heritage in a great city. This year the Families of the Fallen have given us permission to recognize them. Also enjoy the Oscar Meyer Weinermobile, The Planter's Nut Mobile, the United States Marine Corps Band, three pipe bands and 77 Irish related floats. Erin go Bragh, Slainte'!


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Pat Shingleton: "March Blizzards" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-march-blizzards-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-march-blizzards-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 13 Mar 2017 10:32:30 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

March is the month that tries to hang onto winter while tossing in some springtime warmth.  Spring officially springs next Monday and traditionally the nationwide weather combination includes readings in the 80s and other past examples of snowstorms.  Two paralyzing blizzards occurred in March.  The Times News reports that March 12 to 13, 1993 found the “Storm of the Century” dumping 42 inches of snow in the northeast.  On March 11-14, 1888, “The Blizzard of ‘88” blocked trains in New York resulting in over 400 deaths. Rewinding to March 24, 1765, more than two feet of snow was recorded in Eastern., PA and was called “The Washington and Jefferson Snowstorm” because both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson were trapped by the storm in Virginia and Mount Vernon. In Baton Rouge, I remember the Friday before the St. Patrick's Day Parade on March 13, 1993.  My brother Denis arrived from Fort Worth and as we enjoyed the "best Oysters in Town" at Giamanco's on Government Street, flakes were falling outside. Trace amounts were reported in Tangipahoa and Washington Parishes with two inch accumulations in Gulfport.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Time Change..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-time-change-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-time-change-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 10 Mar 2017 6:47:47 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

It's "reminder" time and before you hit the sheets this evening turn the clock ahead an hour. The reason for “Summer Time” or Daylight Saving Time is to make use of daylight. The American delegate to Paris, Benjamin Franklin, first conceived the idea in Paris in 1784 and noted his reasons in an essay called, An Economical Project.  London builder, William Willett, proposed advancing clocks 20 minutes on consecutive Sundays in April and lessening the same amount on four Sundays in September. Almost a hundred years after Ben’s suggestion, the U.S Department of Transportation adopted National Standard time to control train schedules. The first energy benefits of Summer Time were recognized during World War II. History records that daylight saving time was just that, a means of holding onto more daylight hours for more productivity.  In years past the Saturday evening weathercaster was obligated to inform the viewers of a time change to serve this purpose.


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Pat Shingleton: http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--94431/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--94431/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 9 Mar 2017 10:45:46 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

One of the Pink Panther movies finds Inspector Clouseau disguised as a local dentist who is summoned by an unsuspecting and villainous Chief Inspector Dreyfus to extract a bad tooth.   An accidental release of laughing gas puts both characters into hysterics and could possibly be one of the best-humorous scenes in movie history. Nitrous oxide, often used as a dentist’s anesthetic, has become the largest ozone-depleting substance emitted from human activity.  Laughing gas is produced by natural and human-related sources and is a by-product of agricultural fertilization and microbial action in wet tropical forests.  Science magazine reported that a study by NOAA indicated that emissions of N2O have eroded the ozone layer and is expected to continue through the twenty-first century. The passage of another cold front today will have enough "oumph" to pop some afternoon showers.  Once the ridge of high pressure bops in behind the front we will temporarily clear-out. Through the rest of March and into April and early May, we'll enjoy numerous cold fronts and wind-shift lines.  Speaking of cold, the extremely cold early-March weather in Kentucky in '94 caused chilled air to infiltrate Mammoth Cave causing thermal contraction of the rocks and loosening a 100-ton limestone slab, causing it to crash into the Rotunda Area. The average last freeze temperature for our area is March 5. On June 1, '93, St. Cloud, Minnesota recorded its latest ever freezing temperature.


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Pat Shingleton: "Foster's Lager and Violins" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-foster-s-lager-and-violins-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-foster-s-lager-and-violins-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 8 Mar 2017 10:26:48 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

As we prepare for Spring and its official start on March 20, folks in Australia are wrapping up Summer and will be welcoming Autumn.  Australia’s Northern Territory government has suggested that residents of the northern territories, do-their-part to assist in climate change.  In the past, government officials have released a list of  “recommendations” of practical actions for households.  One suggestion includes doing away with special refrigerators.  According to the region’s Power and Water Corporation, these special refrigerators are configured to hold a keg of Foster’s lager. Retiring them would save about $200 per year, per user, in energy consumption.  The chief minister of Australia’s Northern Territory ignored the recommendation noting the need for a barbecue and a beer. Italian violin makers in the 17th and 18th centuries constructed instruments known for their superior quality. Those crafted by Antonio Stradivari may be the most sought after violins of all time. Stradivari lived In Cremona, Italy from 1644 to 1737, which was an era now designated as the Little Ice Age and is also known as Maunder Minimum due to reduced solar activity. Scientists surmise that a change in climate, during this period affected tree growth that ultimately contributed to the improved acoustic quality of these violins. Other Cremonese artisans used only wood grown during the Maunder Minimum.  Researchers believe the slow, even-growth of wood patterns from this era increased the wood's density, thus making it stronger. Many believed Stradivari and others implemented special techniques by using special ovens, wood seasoning or even varnish. Updated research credits climate as the key ingredient.


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Pat Shingleton: "Locusts..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-locusts-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-locusts-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 7 Mar 2017 11:14:41 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Heavy rain and mild temperatures in Northwest Africa can increase the number of locusts.  When skies are overcast, locusts create a swarming configuration that is spread-out. During hot weather, locusts will more likely form swarms that can be a mile high.  Locusts can destroy a field of crops in a matter of hours and in Africa these bugs strike regularly.  In Northwest Africa, locusts have infested an estimated seven to ten million acres of land as desert locusts consume their own weight of food each day.  In twenty-four hours, a small area of swarming locusts eat enough food to feed 2,500 people. By monitoring weather conditions, The National Meteorological and Hydrological Services will be working in conjunction with the World Meteorological Organization and containment specialists to predict the breeding rates of swarms to better eradicate them with pesticides. Also, whether it is ancient scriptures, modern novels, prose or poetry, weather remains a constant reference in literature throughout the ages.  Indra, the god of war and weather is often featured in collections of sacred Hindu writings, first written 3,000 years ago. The Bible, has numerous weather-related references from Noah and the great flood to drought in Genesis.  Weather is another literary feature of the Norse Eddas of the 13th century and according to legend, Thor rode the heavens in a goat-drawn chariot inside storms of thunder and lightning.  In the late 16th and early 17th centuries the dramatic works of William Shakespeare noted weather as a symbolic element of his writings. He used stormy weather as a metaphor for human relationships in Macbeth, Julius Caesar and King Lear.


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Pat Shingleton: "Remembering the Date..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-remembering-the-date-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-remembering-the-date-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 6 Mar 2017 10:42:22 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Everything is “greening-up,” from golf courses to lawns and even the budding trees.  On this date in 1977 I boarded a plane in Kansas City en route to Baton Rouge for the first time. The runways were plowed earlier that morning, piled to the sides of the tarmac.  Arriving in Baton Rouge, I was greeted by Carlton Creemens, blue skies and a temperature in the 60s. During our journey into Baton Rouge I thoroughly enjoyed noticing the “green” along the Interstate, further enhanced around City Park Lake. After visiting with the station manager, Tommie Gibbens, our next stop was on Highland Road, where Carlton ordered lunch. Mike Anderson delivered a tray of food that looked like “bait.” Carleton had an excellent eye for television talent.  Great memories.


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Pat Shingleton: "Strange March Events..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-strange-march-events-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-strange-march-events-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 3 Mar 2017 10:28:03 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On March 6, 1954, Florida received its greatest snowfall when four inches whitened the panhandle city of Milton, Adrian Harris's favorite town,  while two inches covered Pensacola over a 24 hours period.  On March 5, 1997, a swath of hail, five miles wide, stretched from McLain, Mississippi to Leaksville.  The depth of the hail ranged from six inches to a foot in Leaksville. The hail drifted to the edge of the elementary school and was still visible the next day.  On March 4, 1841, President William Henry Harrison took the oath of office on a cloudy, windy, day with the temperature around 48 degrees. His speech lasted a hundred minutes, followed by a horse ride from the Capitol Building without a hat or overcoat. Over the next few days he suffered a cold that escalated into pneumonia and he died one month later. Occasionally I’ll grab “unusual” weather-related items from the “Almanac of the Infamous, Incredible and Ignored.”  Also on this date in 1876, residents of Olympian Springs, Kentucky were wondering how flakes of beef fell from a clear sky. Measuring one to four inches long, the thick shower of meat covered trees and fences over an area of 100 yards by 50.  Residents reported that wind was not a factor in the dispersion of the meat.  Accounts of the event appeared in the Scientific American and New York Times including one startled witness who ate some of the “shower meat,” noting that it tasted fresh, like mutton or venison – yummy...  Inside an office in Newton, New Jersey on March 3, 1929, buckshot fell at different intervals over three days.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Spleen-The Forecast..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-spleen-the-forecast-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-spleen-the-forecast-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 2 Mar 2017 10:30:41 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The accuracy of weather predictions has obviously increased due to technology.  However there are "other" methods that are still used. Years ago, on the Canadian prairie, pig farmer, Gus Wickstrom initiated and continued a tradition handed down to him from his Swedish great-great-grandfather. His weather predictions were accomplished by examining  pig spleens. Wickstrom believed that the depressions and fatty deposits on a two-foot-long pig spleen determined the weather that included cold snaps, summer warmth and early autumns. Gus believed that 80% of the time, his forecast was accurate for a 200-mile radius from the point where the pig was slaughtered.  Another pig spleen examiner, Ken Porter, compared previous spleen forecasts with Environment Canada weather reports. Both forecasters have gone "hog-wild" with amazing accuracies.


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Pat Shingleton: "Early March Headlines" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-early-march-headlines-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-early-march-headlines-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 1 Mar 2017 10:30:46 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Welcome to March with a couple of significant weather events.  March 1, 1910 noted the deadliest avalanche in United States history.  Two trains with carriage cars were stalled on a snowbound grade leading to Steven’s Pass in Washington.  The avalanche swept the engines and cars into a canyon resulting in fatalities ranging from 96 to 118.  The then famous Wellington Station house was also leveled by the avalanche. Other March events include a major ice storm on this date in 1960 that snapped hundreds of miles of power and telephone lines in northern Alabama and northern Georgia. A covering of 1 to 4 Inches of ice was reported and 90% of the trees in Dekalb County were damaged as ice remained on the ground in numerous locations until March 11.


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Pat Shingleton: "Potholes and an Angry Sea..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-potholes-and-an-angry-sea-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-potholes-and-an-angry-sea-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 28 Feb 2017 10:27:05 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Those that have relocated from Western Pennsylvania to Baton Rouge often share their stories of the dismal wintry weather in the Pittsburgh area.  Shakespeare referred to it as the winter of discontent.  Not only is it the winter season up north but the “Pot-Hole Season” too.  After heavy snow, freezing temperatures and the scrape of a snow plow, streets in the northern extremes resemble a lunar landscape. These holes cause nerve-wracking, bone jarring, wheel bending bumps and sometimes you need the experience of a NASCAR driver to avoid them.  Because of the combination of freezing and thawing, roadways flex and crack, crumbling the pavement where cars do the rest. In closing,years ago The Boston Globe reported that the sea was angry on a March day in Boothbay Harbor, Maine.  An unexplained and mysterious event at sea transported waves twelve feet high that blasted harbors and damaged docks.  Witnesses also reported that many of the waves produced a whirlpool effect.  Experts believed it was the result of a squall line surge where rises in ocean levels are created by strong storm winds, moving over the ocean at the same speed as the water.  Surprisingly, a strong storm had previously passed Boothbay at the time the high waves hit the harbor.  Similar reports occurred in Daytona Beach in 1992 and in Bass Harbor, Maine in 1926. 


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Pat Shingleton: "Needed Rain and Ball Lightning" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-needed-rain-and-ball-lightning-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-needed-rain-and-ball-lightning-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 27 Feb 2017 10:27:39 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In Africa the motto "Khotso, Pula, Nala" means Peace, Rain, Prosperity. Young girls participate in the "masokoaneng" or the rain game. One young lady is chosen to enter a village house and steal the stirring stick or their "lesokoana."  If she is caught, she delivers the stick to her village where a victory celebration ensues.  Chaac, is the god of lightning and Mayans, on the Yucatan Peninsula, believed that the thunderbolt was responsible for rain. To keep Chaac happy, human sacrifices were offered in water-filled sinkholes called "cenotes."  Once Chaac received the offering, he would rise from the well and scratch his curved nose against clouds that were believed to be bellies of rain, showering the crops. Heavy scratching would create a thunderstorm. Also, ball lightning appears as a round moving blob 4 to 5 inches in diameter, traveling several hundred feet per second in erratic paths.  Years ago, a neighbor’s home was set afire from the ball lightning. Recently, an Australian scientist developed a mathematical formula to identify its genesis. Theories on how it forms are numerous including microwave radiation from thunderclouds, oxidizing aerosols and burning silicon particles formed during a lightning strike.  John Lowke and his colleagues use standard mathematical equations for the motion of electrons and ions to describe the initiation of ball lightning. Lowke believes that ball lightning occurs when a stream of ions accumulates on the outside of a glass window and the electrical field on the opposite side excites air molecules to form a discharge ball.


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Pat Shingleton: http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--93931/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--93931/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 24 Feb 2017 10:29:28 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On Lake Mille Lacs in Northern Minnesota, anglers drag fully-equipped, four ton houses onto the lake. Resting on two-foot thick ice, these generator powered $ 20,000 homes include carpet, parquet floors, microwaves, surround-sound, and satellite hook-ups. After drilling the hole, underwater cameras spot fish. Before technology, random “house-drops” couldn’t guarantee a good catch, however computers are now complimenting ice-fishing. Computers target reefs where fish feed and tapping a global positioning satellite also determines the perfect spot. Also, the artificial seeding of clouds began in the 1890's when scientists from the United States and Germany developed devices that projected dry ice into clouds. To this day experiments continue on dropping or shooting nuclei into clouds. In August, 2004, the country of Sri Lanka was in the midst of a severe drought.  To remedy the situation a Buddhist organization called the Shanthi Foundation took to the skies. With the backing from Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapakse, the organization secured special water that was blessed by Buddhist monks.  In addition, the monks chanted special stanzas that would encourage rain.  With the use of a helicopter, the water was sprayed over the north central and eastern sections of Sri Lanka. Another ritual was simultaneously enacted on the bank of a dry irrigation reservoir in the region. The rains came, accompanied by gusty winds that damaged power and telephone lines.


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Pat Shingleton: "Weather Predicting Buidings and Avalanche Dogs..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-weather-predicting-buidings-and-avalanche-dogs-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-weather-predicting-buidings-and-avalanche-dogs-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 23 Feb 2017 10:40:53 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

When we were kids a road trip included Pittsburgh, PA and the Gulf building, whose lights changed colors with changing weather. Similar to the Gulf Building, The Hancock Tower in Boston shines blue to indicate a clear view, flashing blue when clouds are due, steady red for rain ahead and flashing red for snow. When the Sox won the World Series in 2004, for the first time since 1918, they broke the "Curse of the Bambino" that was placed on the team when Babe Ruth was sold to the Yankees. Following their victory, the Hancock Tower lights flashed the team colors of red and blue for the very first time and continually for three days as the team's victory parade motored through Bean Town. February is the deadliest month for avalanche victims and Colorado leads the nation in fatalities. The famous St. Bernard’s are considered the original rescue dogs but golden retrievers, with the use of helicopters, are lowered into the Colorado wilderness. The dogs and their trainers are members of the elite Colorado Rapid Avalanche Deployment Team. Their mission is to respond to avalanches, saving people before they die. The team not only uses highly trained dogs and medics but ski mounted avalanche technicians. A snow buried victim only has 15 minutes for rescue, and then their chances drop 50-percent. Dogs are the single most important tool that rescuers have and one dog is worth a hundred human rescuers.


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Pat Shingleton: "David the Shepard and Colds" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-david-the-shepard-and-colds-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-david-the-shepard-and-colds-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 22 Feb 2017 9:59:51 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Thousands visit the Galleria dell' Academia in Florence, Italy each year. They  view the 17-foot-tall masterpiece of Michaelangelo Buonarroti's biblical shepherd, known as David. Over the years, weather has advanced the aging of the 506 year-old   statue. In 1512, lightning struck its base and in 1527 the left arm was broken during riots   against Florence's ruling Medici family. From 1808 through 1815, the statue was coated   with wax for weather proofing and later cleaned with steel brushes and an acidic solution.   Current repairs include cotton swabs and distilled water, applied on the face to remove   contaminants from the body. Experts protect the statue by applying cellulose pulp and clay.   In 1991, a vandal smacked David's foot with a hammer. Also, Researchers believe a modest chill is good for your vascular system. Mom relied on mustard plasters, Vick's Vapo-Rub and salt-water gargling to relive symptoms. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases verify  that drastic changes in temperature are not responsible for these types of illnesses. Germs are primarily transmitted through direct contact and the Institute determined that people tend to be sick, at this time of year, due to time spent indoors. In an environment of dry, indoor air, viruses thrive and are enhanced by way of direct contact. Colds and flu are prevented by hand washing and a little "chill-out" can assist.


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Pat Shingleton: "The President and Cutting the Turf..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-president-and-cutting-the-turf-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-president-and-cutting-the-turf-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 21 Feb 2017 6:48:24 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Recognizing the birthday of our first president on this date in 1732, we review weather related excerpts from his diaries.  Washington was not a scientific observer of the weather, as was Thomas Jefferson.  His weather interests mirrored his agricultural interests and in writing to his farm manager, William Pearce on December 22, 1793, he recognized the importance of a thermometer at Mount Vernon. His diary notes the weather difficulties that he experienced, including his seasick days during a stormy voyage to Barbados and the cruel winter at Valley Forge. An ill-advised horseback ride in a December storm could have contributed to his death.  His prized weather instrument was the weather vane, remaining in use atop the cupola at Mount Vernon. Finally, In Ireland; “if you can see the mountains, it’s about to rain, if you can’t– it’s raining.”  Many still “cut the turf,” setting it aside to dry in the warm sun as the dry peat is later used as a heat source.  Within the fireplace, the “clamp of turf” has a pleasant aroma.  On this date in 1968, in Connemara, farmer Steven Coyne, with his family of seven, was collecting peat when he noticed a 12 foot long beast with a long, slender neck, no eyes on its head, two snail like antennae, slick, black skin and two humps on its back with a flat tail.  In 1954, a Connemara librarian, Belinda Finnegan, sister of Junior, looked out the "winda" and saw a similar creature while fishing with Ivar Quigley.


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Pat Shingleton: "Two Winter Stories..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-two-winter-stories-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-two-winter-stories-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 17 Feb 2017 6:45:50 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Just 30 days remain until the end of Winter. The first European settlers arrived in North America unprepared for the climate that awaited them. Harsh weather greeted these visitors to the New World with extreme cold and unbearable heat. In 1604, French explorers established a colony on an island in Maine's St. Croix River. The winter was so cold that they relocated to Nova Scotia. There were 105 colonists who settled at Jamestown, Va. Only 32 survived the famous Cold Winter of 1607-08. The winter of 1620-21 was reportedly mild, but only 50 of the 102 settlers of Plymouth, Mass. lasted until spring. By 1638, the first printing press arrived in Cambridge, Mass. and "Pierce's Almanac Calculated for New England" was printed. The almanac, which comes from the Arabic "al manaka" meaning "the reckoning," offered tables for tides and astronomical events. Besides the almanac, the only reading material was the Bible. In closing, "The storm paralyzed the entire Northeast, immobilizing everyone. New York and D.C. were cut-off from the rest of the country. Albany picked up 47 inches of snow and Troy, NY, recorded 55 inches. Trains inbound and outbound of New York City were foundered in drifted snow, paralyzing the the rail system. Ferry crossings were rendered impossible due to rough waters as the Brooklyn Bridge became Manhattan's last link with the outside world. Ice floes that were wedged together on the East River formed a tenuous crossing. Once the tide went out, the ice broke, leaving 100 trapped on the floes. As the snow tapered off, residents emerged from their homes and began the process of digging out.." These were excerpts from the "Old Farmer's Almanac, Acts of God" concerning the blizzard of 1888 where meteorologists claim a storm this size occurs once every four or five hundred years. 


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Pat Shingleton: "The Volstead Act and Guinness" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-volstead-act-and-guinness-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-volstead-act-and-guinness-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 16 Feb 2017 6:01:17 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Yesterday's "post" noted a molasses explosion and a response and reason from one of our past employees. Jon Vail assisted us during our broadcasts years ago.on the floor detail during our broadcasts at WBRZ, is a graduate of LSU and an avid history buff. Here's the excerpt from the previous columns. "Each evening I mention the next-day Advocate column on our 10 PM newscasts and noted the Great Molasses Flood of 1919. An overnight low of 2 degrees in Boston could have exploded the 2.5 million gallon tank, sending a 30 foot high wall of molasses on the city.  John informed me that the reason for the vast amount of molasses at that time coincided with The Volstead Act, also known as Prohibition. He noted that the Federal Government provided distillers a final opportunity to “flood” the market with liquor and in this situation would have been the manufacture and distribution of lots of rum." Finally, "Bubbly Ice" is glacier ice containing trapped air bubbles. Scientists have confirmed what Paddy Quigley, former proprietor and well know owner of Ivar's had always known, Guinness bubbles sink.  At the University of Edinburgh's School of Chemistry it was proven that bubbles flow down instead of upwards.  Early observations thought that once the dark liquid hit the glass there was the illusion that the bubbles were going down. Closer examination revealed that as the pint settled, bubbles touching the walls of the glass experienced drag, preventing bubbles from flowing up. Bubbles in the middle of the glass rise freely causing bubbles at the edge to be pushed downwards on the inside surface. Ivar Quigley and his sister Belinda, langers from Cork, incorrectly believe Smithwicks Lager does the same.


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Pat Shingleton: "Bed Warmers..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bed-warmers-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bed-warmers-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 14 Feb 2017 6:45:40 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Homes built in the 1900s had limited insulation. Even though the coal furnace was stoked overnight, it didn't emit enough heat when the temperature slipped to -5 at daybreak. The remedy was bricks, heated near a fireplace and wrapped in a towel. Some resorted to the traditional "bed warmer." This device resembled a skillet with a a long handle and lid. Coals, placed in the container, warmed the bed by repeatedly sliding the pan between the sheets and the outer blankets. As an early morning paperboy, tossing the Pittsburgh Post Gazette, it wasn't unusual for me to "hit-the-sack," fully dressed, to avoid the morning chill at 6:00 A.M. In closing, our episodes of cold weather certainly can't compare to the folks in the Northeast that are anxious to get a thaw out and a meltdown. AA few years ago, Parade Magazine determined the best accessory for snow playing. Earmuffs, woolly socks or sunglasses? Sunglasses, worn on sunny, wintry days prevent photokeratitis or snow blindness. After taking your dog for a snowy, winter walk, what is the first thing to do when returning home? Wiping down its paws, a blanket rub-down or extra water? In snow episodes, or a cold rain, pets track through melting chemicals and rock salt that cause pad cuts. Paw wiping is always suggested. Finally, how thick should the ice be before you don your skates? Four to five inches of ice can hold 250 pounds of weight.


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Pat Shingleton: "How it Started..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-how-it-started-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-how-it-started-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 13 Feb 2017 10:31:10 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

You’re valentine card today comes from of an interesting legend.  While in prison, it is believed that Valentine fell in love with the jailor’s daughter who visited him during his confinement. Before his death, he wrote her a letter, which he signed; 'From your Valentine.'  I’ve located a few Valentine’s Day cities and one that the editor won’t permit me to print outside Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. There’s lots of warmth today in Valentine, Nebraska.  Loveland, Colorado, Ohio and Oklahoma look lovely with rose deliveries in Belle Rose and St. Rose, Louisiana. Valentine's Day, 1895, and the all-time single snow event for our state recorded in Rayne, LA as two feet of snow was reported.


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