WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2017, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Mon, 11 Dec 2017 HH:12:ss GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Coats and Peanuts..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-coats-and-peanuts-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-coats-and-peanuts-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 8 Dec 2017 8:35:00 AM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

In December, 2008 we were preparing for our "Pat's Coats for Kids" distribution.  Traditionally, the school counselors arrive at the back parking lot of WBRZ and secure the needed coats for their kids. Similar to 2008, closed schools and tricky travel prevented the distribution and will be completed on Monday. The comic strip “Peanuts” would regularly depict a variety of weather scenes that included Snoopy sunbathing atop his box, Lucy carrying an umbrella, and Charlie Brown shoveling snow. The Little Blue Book notes that on December 9, 1965, “A Charlie Brown Christmas” premiered on television and was based on the Infancy Narrative of St. Luke as Charlie tries to find the true meaning of Christmas.  The program won an Emmy and a Peabody Award that resulted in 30 additional Peanuts shows.  Peanuts creator, Charles Schultz’s first job was a cartoonist at the Catholic magazine, Timeless Topix. His cartoon strip was retired in January, 2000 and when the final “Peanuts” cartoon appeared in the Sunday papers, he died in his sleep on February 12, 2000.


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Pat Shingleton: "12/7/'41 and Snow Sheds" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-12-7-41-and-snow-sheds-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-12-7-41-and-snow-sheds-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 6 Dec 2017 10:37:53 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Weather forecasting was in its infancy before the attack on Pearl Harbor on this date in 1941.  Weather served as a convenient coding for covert messages that Japan sent to overseas officials leading up to the attack. When Japanese-Soviet relations were broken the message would read, KITA NO KAZE KUMORI or “north wind, cloudy.” If Japanese-British ties were to be cut, the message would read NISHI NO KAZE HARE or “West wind, clear” and if Japan was severing relations with the United States, the message would read HIGASHI NO KAZE AME, or “East wind, rain.” The message would appear at the end of shortwave radio reports alerting officials to destroy all sensitive documents. Also, one of the many hazards included in the construction of the transcontinental railroad was snow.  Massive amounts of snow from the Sierras eastward to Sacramento created avalanches that often wiped out newly constructed stretches of rail. In 1887 engineers utilized heavy beams from local timber to construct a sturdy device that not only furthered construction but keep the trains rolling, even today. They're called snow sheds and initially were placed over several miles of exposed track to funnel the sliding snow over the top of the tracks. Today the snow sheds remain a common method for combating the destructive force of avalanches on railroad and highway routes throughout the world.  Instead of wood they are constructed with reinforced concrete and steel.  On steep slopes, dangerous snow conditions are lessened by installing snow fences that anchor the snow packs.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Feast of St. Nicholas..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-feast-of-st-nicholas-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-feast-of-st-nicholas-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 5 Dec 2017 6:07:19 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Today is the Feast of St. Nicholas and since the fifth century it has been celebrated on this date. Nicholas was the bishop of Myra which is modern-day Turkey.  The Little Blue Book - Advent and Christmas Seasons mentions that Nicholas aided people in need, anonymously throwing small bags of gold in their windows.  The legend has the bags landing in stockings drying near the fireplace. His generosity encouraged others to give gifts during Candlemas.  English reformers replaced Nicolas with Father Christmas, believing he was too close to the Catholic Church. Later the name became Santa Claus and Clement Moore gave him a sleigh, reindeer, pipe, bag and a chimney in "The Night Before Christmas.


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Pat Shingleton: "Layers - Year Round..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-layers-year-round-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-layers-year-round-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 4 Dec 2017 9:48:57 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

One "School-of-Thought" suggests that a same, consistent application of clothing, year-round, prevents the body from elevated or adjusted temperatures. Most of us are accustomed to adding clothing during the cold weather months and shedding clothing as we get closer to the end of Spring.  Personal examples take be back many years noting our grandfather who resided with us.  Bert Price wore the same clothing day-in and day-out.  His “wardrobe” consisted of cotton long johns with heavy socks, a cotton or flannel shirt with bib overalls and a railroad hat. He kept the sleeves on his long-sleeve shirt in place with elastic garters. The only modification of his attire were heavy pants, that included suspenders. when heading outdoors, his additions included work gloves and once his "dressing" procedures were completed, he loaded a wad of Mail Pouch tobacco into his cheek he was ready-to-go. His high top shoes were occasionally covered with galoshes. This was his uniform when he was a switchman on the railroad and his uniform during his remaining years. During the winter months he would don a coat called a “mackinaw” and except for his “Sunday-Go-To-Meetin’” clothes, this was his outfit for all seasons. Surprisingly, he seldom contracted a cold or flu-like symptoms as I never saw him sweat profusely or shiver. My friend Wilbert "Big-Will" Lewis also wears the same layered clothing all year long. He too is out-in-the elements, year-round, staying comfortable.


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"November Events and my Snow Storm" http://www.wbrz.com/news/november-events-and-my-snow-storm-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/november-events-and-my-snow-storm-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 1 Dec 2017 10:24:37 PM Pat Shingleton:

Historical weather events for the end of November and the first of December include extremely cold weather on November 29, 1831, that led to the closing of New York’s Erie Canal through December.  On December 1, 1969, an island was submerged from a stalled low pressure system in the Hawaiian Islands near the French Frigate Shoals. Three feet of water covered the 300 foot-wide Tern Island causing the evacuation of the Coast Guard station. In Claiborne Parish on December 3, 1962, tennis ball sized hail covered the ground and chipped sidewalks in Goodwin as 40 mph winds tore off roofs and another excerpt. In 1979 I commuted just about every week from Baton Rouge to Pittsburgh while doing a stint with the NBC affiliate, WPXI.  I would leave my car at the Airport Sheraton, expecting my routine trek through the city to the station. In late November a surprise snowstorm dumped a foot of snow on the city within a couple of hours, delaying my travel time from 25 minutes to four hours. Worse than skidding on the parkway in Pittsburgh was the attire I donned when leaving Baton Rouge that morning – shorts and a golf shirt. Most of the floor crew shouted “Fore,” as I entered the station shivering and snow covered.


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Pat Shingleton: "An Oak Tree and a Bell..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-oak-tree-and-a-bell-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-oak-tree-and-a-bell-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 30 Nov 2017 10:46:15 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In ancient times,the oak tree was hit by lightning more than other trees and became the symbol of the thunder god.  The bay laurel was thought to be immune to deadly lightning hits. Roman generals would wear laurel wreaths as they victoriously entered the Eternal City and believed the wreaths would protect them from the jealous anger of the god Jove.  The emperor Tiberius wore laurel during a thunderstorm, while Augustus would don his sealskin coat during inclement weather.  The ancient practice of awarding a laurel wreath to the champions of athletic competition stems from the same belief and continues today at the annual Boston Marathon.  On April 15, 1718, 24 churches in St. Pol de Leon in Brittany, France, started ringing bells to keep away lightning. All 24 were struck, six churches that weren't clanging, weren't. "Poor Richard's Almanac" included an article in 1753 entitled "How to Secure Houses from Lightning."  An inventor explained the success of his experiments with rods attached to the homes of fellow Philadelphians.  In 1760, merchant William West's home was hit by lightning.  The rod attached to West's home performed just as its inventor had predicted, and the house remained unscathed.  As people in Europe hailed the invention, others were antagonistic to the idea.  In addition, church leaders rejected the idea of protecting the church steeples from lightning, believing that these strikes were an act of God.  In Italy, military authorities would store explosives in church vaults, feeling they were secure.  In 1767, the church of St. Nazaire in Brescia was hit by lightning exploding 100 tons of gunpowder.  As you probably know, the inventor of the lightning rod was Benjamin Franklin, still keeping us safe today.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Lobster Pot..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-lobster-pot-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-lobster-pot-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 29 Nov 2017 10:28:39 PM Pat Shingelton: Pat Shingleton:

Lobster pots are identified with a tag, noting the owner and port of origin. In 1990, a Korean container ship bound for the United States experienced treacherous weather and 80,000 Nike shoes were swept overboard.  Oceanographers used the shoes as “tracers,” providing validation of ocean currents. Shoes from the shipment are still retrieved on beaches from Alaska to Oregon and Hawaii.  In 2010, in Waterville, County Kerry Ireland, Rosemary Hill retrieved a lobster pot including a plate depicting the name, Richard F. Gueiredo.  The plate came from the Andrea Gail, showcased in Sebastian Junger’s book, “Perfect Storm”. The pot was adrift since October 1991 when it capsized, killing all on board. The pot drifted for 20 years over 3,000 miles of ocean.


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Pat Shingeton: "The Livermore Bulb..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingeton-the-livermore-bulb-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingeton-the-livermore-bulb-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 28 Nov 2017 10:31:58 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingeton:

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Pat Shingleton: "Weather Phobia..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-weather-phobia-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-weather-phobia-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 27 Nov 2017 10:28:43 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

When the thunder rumbles, our pet Yorkie reacts. Years ago our kids re-named him Mr. Shivers.  Doggie may suffer from Brontophobia or the fear of thunder. There are many phobias related to storms and other weather phenomena. If strong gusty winds are bothersome, winds and drafts are Aerophobias and Anemophobias. Surprisingly, the Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights present symptoms of Auroraphobia. The fear of snow and snow accumulations is called Chionophobia. The phobia for dense fog is Homlichophobia while dampness and moisture are characteristics of Hygrophobia. One of the leading weather related phobias is the fear of tornadoes or Kyklonasophobia. Fear of coldness and cold weather is Kryophobia while heat is Thermophobia. The prediction of rain and flooding may cause distress for some and are classified as Ombrophobia and Pymmyraphobia but severe storms with lightning, thunder and downpours are Trikymia and Kataigidaphobia.


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Pat Shingleton: "Getting Home and D.B. Cooper..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-getting-home-and-d-b-cooper-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-getting-home-and-d-b-cooper-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 22 Nov 2017 9:59:28 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Some of you may identify with transportation needs during our college days. We would load a car with as many as possible for the trek home. At Gannon University, Marty DeRose was the wheel man, transporting our fraternity brothers to Meadville, Ellwood City and Beaver Falls, PA. We left Erie on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving in 1968 with clouds and light flurries. By the time we hit Meadville we also hit the "snowbelt" and a full-blown blizzard. Marty made the deliveries in time to make it to Duffy's Tavern where Little Joe was bangin' out tunes for a couple hundred college kids. Thanksgiving Day was mud or snow football and those great smells emanating from Shirley Shingleton's kitchen.  Wishing you and yours safe travel and a Happy Thanksgiving. Here's another item... on Thanksgiving Eve, 1971, travelers were inconvenienced because of one passenger.Over the Pacific Northwest, D.B. Cooper opened the aft door of a Northwest Airlines Jet and jumped into a sky filled with cold, freezing rain.  Earlier that evening he handed flight attendant Flo Schaffner a hijacking note, opened a brief case to reveal a battery and wired red tubes. He demanded four parachutes and $200,000 in twenty dollar bills to be delivered upon landing in Seattle. All passengers were released, the plane refueled and took off. He ordered that the cabin not be pressurized. On Thanksgiving Day, 1971, the rugged Washington State forest was extensively searched and to this day, D.B. Cooper or the remains of D.B. have never been found. 


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Pat Shingleton: "The Mayflower and the First Thanksgiving" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-mayflower-and-the-first-thanksgiving-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-mayflower-and-the-first-thanksgiving-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 21 Nov 2017 10:14:23 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Historian William Bradford and later the governor of Plymouth Plantation, chronicled the difficulties of the Pilgrim's crossing. The decision for the Pilgrims to land on the shores of Massachusetts was dictated by the weather. The small 180-ton ship, named The Mayflower, was sailing near the southeastern tip of Cape Cod on November 19,1620, expecting to hold its course and land in New York Harbor. With high winds and waves, the crew plotted another course, turning northward, picking up southerly winds and finding smoother sailing after rounding the northern tip of the Cape into the protected waters of the bay. Clear weather and  favorable winds on November 20 kept The Mayflower on its northerly tack and it dropped anchor in the morning of the 21st in Provincetown Harbor after 65 days at sea.  The winter of 1620-1621 was "a calm winter, such as was never seen here since" wrote Thomas Dudley of Massachusetts Bay. Details as to subsequent winters during the first decade of settlement at Plymouth are sketchy.  Journals that were returned to England may have been slanted toward favorable weather conditions, possibly designed to not only please sponsors, but to persuade other settlers to come to America. Almost half of the original passengers and crew of the Mayflower encountered disease during the first winter on the shores of Massachusetts and Cape Cod Bay. Many stayed on the Mayflower, anchored a mile offshore and weather permitting, went ashore each day to build adequate shelters.  As for the Thanksgiving menu, the Pilgrims may have enjoyed wild fowl, venison, seal, wheat flour, Indian corn, pumpkin, peas, beans, onions, lettuce, radishes, carrots, plums, grapes, chestnuts, and acorns. Seasonings included liverwort, leeks, dried currants, and parsnips.


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Pat Shingleton: "Frost and Clearing the Land..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-frost-and-clearing-the-land-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-frost-and-clearing-the-land-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 16 Nov 2017 9:50:30 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

We are projecting a start temperature of 37 degrees Monday morning. Barbara Tufty's book, 1001 Questions About Hurricanes, Tornadoes and Other Natural Air Disasters mentions that frost usually occurs on clear, calm nights during the autumn when the air up top is moist. In South Louisiana frost occurs closer to the beginning of winter. When tender plants aren't affected, it's an example of light frost. Heavy frost contains crystallized water and doesn't kill sturdy vegetation. The most destructive frost to vegetation is killing frost while black frost or hard frost hits northern areas in late autumn when temperatures are consistently below freezing. A hard or black frost will cause leaf edges and plant tips to turn black as if they were burnt. Meteorologically, a freeze is defined as a period of time when the surface temperature of a whole air mass remains below freezing.  That could occur for us in mid-January.  Last year, our first freeze was November 21st with the first freeze of 2015 on November 23rd. In closing, in the late 1700s, many scholars were debating whether human activities were changing the earth’s climate.  Thomas Jefferson and his colleague, Harvard professor Samuel Williams, wrote, ”A change in our climate is taking place…both heats and colds are much more moderate within the memory of the middle-aged. When settlers enter a township their first business is to cut down trees, clear lands and sow grains.”  It was their belief that the surface of the earth became warm and dry and as settlements increased, the effects are more extensive. Dr. Noah Webster believed that the clearing of lands welcomed more sun, thus the changeover from forest to field changes the heat balance.  Webster’s reflections were noted by Helmut Landsberg 170 years later.


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Pat Shingleton: "Collecting Ice and the Monarchs..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-collecting-ice-and-the-monarchs-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-collecting-ice-and-the-monarchs-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 14 Nov 2017 9:49:18 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

We're not expecting an icy weather but there should be a return to some snappy weather next Monday. Years ago ice houses were built near freshwater lakes and streams where winter ice was available.  During the winter months, ice and snow would be transported into the ice house and packed with sawdust or straw for insulation that would last into the summer months.  Archaeologists have discovered ice pits from the seventh century and Alexander the Great stored snow in pits. In the third century, Rome imported mountain snow, stored it in straw-covered pits and later sold it in snow shops. The more expensive ice was at the bottom of pit compared to the snow at the top. In Texas, former ice houses have been converted to bars. From ice to butterflies. Monarchs are one of the most common North American butterflies with black-edged wings and a bright reddish-brown body.  They reproduce several times in areas from Texas to Minnesota. At the beginning of Fall their migration begins as they fly from the Canadian border to mountain groves west of Mexico City.  Here is where the Oyamel firs provide shelter from rain and temperatures that dip below freezing. In the spring they fly north, visiting Baton Rouge and stopping at fields of milkweed to lay eggs. In January of 2002 about 80 percent of the monarch population died when falling temps caused rain to form ice crystals. Scientists have predicted an increase in global temperatures by a few degrees over the next century. This increase could activate more ocean evaporation therefore increasing rainfall in central Mexico. With more rain and persistent cold a massive die-off of the Monarchs could occur.


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Pat Shingleton: "Stocking Rate and the "V" Formation" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-stocking-rate-and-the-v-formation-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-stocking-rate-and-the-v-formation-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 13 Nov 2017 10:27:36 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

A "stocking rate" reflects how many animals a designated area of acreage will support. The unpredictability of precipitation causes difficulty for Great Plains ranchers to estimate this rate. Scientists developed a new computer model to assist by extrapolating National Weather Service seasonal weather predictions. A revised computer model tests various scenarios for forage  yields and the weight gains of livestock under varied weather conditions. Ranchers are able to better estimate if precipitation will likely be above or below normal for a given season.This model will also determine the effects of increased carbon dioxide and higher temperatures on pasture forage. In closing, Duck Season opened last weekend and Luke Guarisco, was awarded “Best Duck Caller” for the fifth year in a row, receiving accolades from hunters but not the ducks. Geese fly in a "V" formation, providing the flock with 71% greater flying range than if each was on its own. Flying out of formation causes resistance drag as geese will return to take advantage of the lifting power from the bird in front of it. When the lead goose tires, it rotates back and another goose assumes the point position. Just like Luke, geese in the rear honk to encourage those ahead to hold their speed. If a goose gets sick or wounded, two geese leave the formation to lend help and remain with the injured goose until death or flying again. 


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Pat Shingleton: "The Edmund Fitgerald and Stocking Rate..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-edmund-fitgerald-and-stocking-rate-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-edmund-fitgerald-and-stocking-rate-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 9 Nov 2017 10:30:38 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Early November weather events created headlines in days-gone-by. On November 10, 1975, 78 mph winds created waves that caused the 729 foot, 13,600 ton ore carrier, Edmund Fitzgerald, to break-in-half and sink in Lake Superior claiming the crew of 29. November 9, 1982 found seven tornadoes touching down in Los Angeles, CA with three of the twisters originating as waterspouts in Malibu and Long Beach. On November 10, 1998, a "land hurricane" set an all-time record for low pressure for the state of Iowa, measuring 28.54 in Estherville and Spencer. The same system cranked winds of 93 mph at La Crosse and Mackinac Island, WI. November 11, 1995 found one of the oldest trees in Alabama toppled by high winds. The storm system swept through the Kymulga Grist Park in Talladega. The 100 foot tree was six feet in diameter and between 200 and 300 years old. And finally, for cattle and sheep ranchers a “stocking rate” reflects how many animals a designated area of acreage will support.  The USDA/Agricultural Research Center reported the unpredictability of precipitation causes difficulty for ranchers in the Great Plains to estimate this rate.  Scientists have developed a new computer model to assist the ranchers.  By extrapolating National Weather Service seasonal weather predictions a new model tests various scenarios for forage yields and the weight gains of livestock under a variety of weather conditions.  Ranchers will now be able to better estimate if precipitation will likely be above or below normal for a given season.  This model will also determine the effects of increased carbon dioxide and higher temperatures on pasture forage. Testing on the model will continue through the Central Plains.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Big Blackout and Tree Rings" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-big-blackout-and-tree-rings-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-big-blackout-and-tree-rings-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 8 Nov 2017 10:33:01 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

With last weekend’s time change and the Sun’s movement to the Southern Hemisphere, sunset is adjusted to 5:11 p.m. By 5:45 p.m. it’s pitch-black! Speaking of being in the dark, on this date in 1965, thirty million people in eight states and Ontario were without light. During the rush hour in New York City and other metropolitan areas in the northeast, total darkness occurred at 5:16 p.m. Later referred to as the Big Blackout, people were trapped in elevators, on subways and freeways.  The back-up relay of one of six - connecting the Sir Adam Beck No 2 Generating Station, north of Niagara Falls, locked-up, and caused a power surge, tripping circuit breakers.  A ripple effect ensued with circuits tripped all along the line zapping 30 interconnected power stations. Also, tree rings have become a fingerprint to historic weather events and a dendrologist is a scientist who studies them. Should you notice a recently cut tree, inspect and count the tree rings that may  identify out drought in 1982. Before the pilgrims arrived at Plymouth Rock, 117 colonists stepped ashore onto Roanoke Island on what is now North Carolina. The Lost Colony of Roanoke remains one of the most intriguing disappearances in our history.  The entire village disappeared and in years past, historians and archeologists were unable to determine the fate of the colonists.  In 1998, dendrologists uncovered a possible answer, tree rings. Tree rings that were discovered from a stand of bald cypress trees targeted an incredible drought that began before the colonists arrived on July 22, 1587.  This drought may have wiped out the village.


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Pat Shingleton: "wine Weather and Thunderstorm Asthma..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wine-weather-and-thunderstorm-asthma-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wine-weather-and-thunderstorm-asthma-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 7 Nov 2017 9:53:45 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The massive California wildfires compromised many vineyards in the Napa and Sanoma Valleys.  Their loss is ours as well for not only choice wines but grape juice as well. Sugar, acid and more than 200 flavor components give each grape a variety of characters. It's what makes your Riesling crisp and your Cabernet Sauvignon rich. Weatherwise Magazine reported that as grapes ripen through the summer months, sugars accumulate and acids diminish.  In the final weeks before the harvest the flavor compounds erupt and through the delicately balanced, weather-dependent process, the magic occurs. Too much heat and the sugars quickly develop before the flavors arrive. This results in a wine that is alcohol heavy and low in acidity. If the temperatures aren't high enough the grape won't completely ripen and the flavors are stunted and your merlot won't have a mellow glow. Grower's love a long, slow, warm and dry season finale. In closing, researchers determined that thunderstorms rupture pollen grains that release allergens that are then scattered by strong winds. Studies documented the link between asthma and the numerous episodes of thunderstorms.  Scientists from the University of Georgia and Emory University determined that the number of hospital visits for asthma-related problems in Atlanta increased after thunderstorms. The medical journal, Thorax, reported that hospital data from 20 counties in the Atlanta region matched data on thunderstorms, total daily rainfall and wind gusts at Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport during the same period. This research assisted in preparing strategies for treatment and prevention.


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Pat Shingleton: "Galloping Gertie..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-galloping-gertie-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-galloping-gertie-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 6 Nov 2017 10:39:12 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

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Pat Shingleton: "The Front Porch and Saving Time..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-front-porch-and-saving-time-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-front-porch-and-saving-time-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 3 Nov 2017 9:44:23 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Porches were originally designed to provide sufficient space for folks to pause before entering or exiting a home or building.  Porches in England provided cover for worshippers and for liturgical use.  Before a baptism, the priest would begin the service on the porch.  In medieval times, a room was added above the porch to be used as a school room, storeroom or armory or as a custodian residence for supervision of the church.  I remember our back porch as an area for removal of working clothes, boots and shoes and assisted Mom in decreasing dirt from the interior of the house. Our covered front porch provided protection from sun and rain. The porch was a place of interaction with family, friends and visitors and is rarely experienced these days. In closing, excerpts of this article were mentioned in previous entries at this time of the year as we say goodbye to Daylight-Saving-Time  Saturday night and Sunday morning. Daylight-Saving-Time makes the sun "set" one hour later and reduces the period between sunset and bedtime by one hour. It was first mentioned by Benjamin Franklin in 1784 and was first advocated by London builder William Wellett in his pamphlet "Waste of Daylight." He proposed advancing clocks 20 minutes over four Sundays in April and retarding them by the same amount over four Sundays in September. In 1916, England followed Germany and adopted "British Summer Time." During World War II, clocks were put two hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time in what was referred to as Double Summer Time.


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Pat Shingleton: "Dirty Jobs and The Wet..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dirty-jobs-and-the-wet-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dirty-jobs-and-the-wet-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 2 Nov 2017 10:28:03 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Mike Rowe hosted a program entitled "Dirty Jobs..."  A  couple of publications noted the worst jobs.  The breakout includes a worm parasitologist who examines human parasites that can be 16 inches to 3 feet long.  A lab animal veterinarian makes animals sick to find a greater cure for other animals. Researching decades-old garbage is the job of the landfill monitor. Each day at St. John's Harbor roughly 32 million gallons of raw sewage is pumped into this Newfoundland harbor. The water is so polluted that technicians must test the water each day. Added to the list of the worst scientific jobs is an Iraqi archeologist, a tick dragger to assess Lyme disease and a nosologist who keeps track of the causes of death.  Rounding out the list is the TV weathercaster or meteorologist. The article contends that sometimes for ratings, news directors are calling the shots on forecasts. Former Directors of News tried this with me, I wonder where they are? In closing, the clash of air masses that moves equator ward from both hemispheres is known as the familiar Intertropical Convergence Zone.  In addition to being a breeding ground of tropical storms the ITCZ creates a cloud pattern that resembles a string of pearls as seen from satellites. As the ITCZ seasonally shifts away from the Atlantic it moves south of the Equator releasing hot, unstable conditions that launch clusters of intense thunderstorms. From October through December, the mostly dry buildup to the monsoon season is what Australians call "The Wet." From the end of May until early September we experience high humidity, readings in the 90s and afternoon convective showers. In the Tropic of Capricorn, the Aussies experience "The Wet" with temperatures in early December at 6 PM soaring above 100.  Some days will find blazing tropical sunlight with hot, dry southeasterlies blowing in from the deserts.


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