WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2017, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Sun, 19 Feb 2017 21:02:50 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Two Winter Stories..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-two-winter-stories-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-two-winter-stories-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 17 Feb 2017 6:45:50 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Just 30 days remain until the end of Winter. The first European settlers arrived in North America unprepared for the climate that awaited them. Harsh weather greeted these visitors to the New World with extreme cold and unbearable heat. In 1604, French explorers established a colony on an island in Maine's St. Croix River. The winter was so cold that they relocated to Nova Scotia. There were 105 colonists who settled at Jamestown, Va. Only 32 survived the famous Cold Winter of 1607-08. The winter of 1620-21 was reportedly mild, but only 50 of the 102 settlers of Plymouth, Mass. lasted until spring. By 1638, the first printing press arrived in Cambridge, Mass. and "Pierce's Almanac Calculated for New England" was printed. The almanac, which comes from the Arabic "al manaka" meaning "the reckoning," offered tables for tides and astronomical events. Besides the almanac, the only reading material was the Bible. In closing, "The storm paralyzed the entire Northeast, immobilizing everyone. New York and D.C. were cut-off from the rest of the country. Albany picked up 47 inches of snow and Troy, NY, recorded 55 inches. Trains inbound and outbound of New York City were foundered in drifted snow, paralyzing the the rail system. Ferry crossings were rendered impossible due to rough waters as the Brooklyn Bridge became Manhattan's last link with the outside world. Ice floes that were wedged together on the East River formed a tenuous crossing. Once the tide went out, the ice broke, leaving 100 trapped on the floes. As the snow tapered off, residents emerged from their homes and began the process of digging out.." These were excerpts from the "Old Farmer's Almanac, Acts of God" concerning the blizzard of 1888 where meteorologists claim a storm this size occurs once every four or five hundred years. 


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Pat Shingleton: "The Volstead Act and Guinness" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-volstead-act-and-guinness-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-volstead-act-and-guinness-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 16 Feb 2017 6:01:17 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Yesterday's "post" noted a molasses explosion and a response and reason from one of our past employees. Jon Vail assisted us during our broadcasts years ago.on the floor detail during our broadcasts at WBRZ, is a graduate of LSU and an avid history buff. Here's the excerpt from the previous columns. "Each evening I mention the next-day Advocate column on our 10 PM newscasts and noted the Great Molasses Flood of 1919. An overnight low of 2 degrees in Boston could have exploded the 2.5 million gallon tank, sending a 30 foot high wall of molasses on the city.  John informed me that the reason for the vast amount of molasses at that time coincided with The Volstead Act, also known as Prohibition. He noted that the Federal Government provided distillers a final opportunity to “flood” the market with liquor and in this situation would have been the manufacture and distribution of lots of rum." Finally, "Bubbly Ice" is glacier ice containing trapped air bubbles. Scientists have confirmed what Paddy Quigley, former proprietor and well know owner of Ivar's had always known, Guinness bubbles sink.  At the University of Edinburgh's School of Chemistry it was proven that bubbles flow down instead of upwards.  Early observations thought that once the dark liquid hit the glass there was the illusion that the bubbles were going down. Closer examination revealed that as the pint settled, bubbles touching the walls of the glass experienced drag, preventing bubbles from flowing up. Bubbles in the middle of the glass rise freely causing bubbles at the edge to be pushed downwards on the inside surface. Ivar Quigley and his sister Belinda, langers from Cork, incorrectly believe Smithwicks Lager does the same.


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Pat Shingleton: "Bed Warmers..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bed-warmers-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bed-warmers-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 14 Feb 2017 6:45:40 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Homes built in the 1900s had limited insulation. Even though the coal furnace was stoked overnight, it didn't emit enough heat when the temperature slipped to -5 at daybreak. The remedy was bricks, heated near a fireplace and wrapped in a towel. Some resorted to the traditional "bed warmer." This device resembled a skillet with a a long handle and lid. Coals, placed in the container, warmed the bed by repeatedly sliding the pan between the sheets and the outer blankets. As an early morning paperboy, tossing the Pittsburgh Post Gazette, it wasn't unusual for me to "hit-the-sack," fully dressed, to avoid the morning chill at 6:00 A.M. In closing, our episodes of cold weather certainly can't compare to the folks in the Northeast that are anxious to get a thaw out and a meltdown. AA few years ago, Parade Magazine determined the best accessory for snow playing. Earmuffs, woolly socks or sunglasses? Sunglasses, worn on sunny, wintry days prevent photokeratitis or snow blindness. After taking your dog for a snowy, winter walk, what is the first thing to do when returning home? Wiping down its paws, a blanket rub-down or extra water? In snow episodes, or a cold rain, pets track through melting chemicals and rock salt that cause pad cuts. Paw wiping is always suggested. Finally, how thick should the ice be before you don your skates? Four to five inches of ice can hold 250 pounds of weight.


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Pat Shingleton: "How it Started..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-how-it-started-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-how-it-started-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 13 Feb 2017 10:31:10 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

You’re valentine card today comes from of an interesting legend.  While in prison, it is believed that Valentine fell in love with the jailor’s daughter who visited him during his confinement. Before his death, he wrote her a letter, which he signed; 'From your Valentine.'  I’ve located a few Valentine’s Day cities and one that the editor won’t permit me to print outside Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. There’s lots of warmth today in Valentine, Nebraska.  Loveland, Colorado, Ohio and Oklahoma look lovely with rose deliveries in Belle Rose and St. Rose, Louisiana. Valentine's Day, 1895, and the all-time single snow event for our state recorded in Rayne, LA as two feet of snow was reported.


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Pat Shingleton: "Ice Flows on Mississippi" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ice-flows-on-mississippi-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ice-flows-on-mississippi-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 10 Feb 2017 10:29:09 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The cold blast of February 1899 was one of the most severe ever recorded.  All-time record lows were logged in Milligan, OH at minus 39 degrees and Camp Clarke, NE at -47.  Local and state records were posted at Tallahassee and Minden, LA with a frigid minus 16 degrees.  All time record lows are still on the books in Dallas at -8, Kansas City at -22 and Washington D.C. at -15.  Adding to the super cold was a super blizzard from New Hampshire to Georgia with Virginia recording 40 inches of snow.  Once the cold blast made it to Baton Rouge, ice-floes blocked the Mississippi River at New Orleans for the second time in history.In February, 1971, Edwin Robinson of Falmouth, Maine, jackknifed his truck on an icy overpass. He suffered severe damage to the  occipital area of his brain and gradually lost his eyesight. With his hearing also impaired, for the next nine years, he learned Braille.  While in his yard on June 4, 1980, he attempted to "cluck" his pet chicken inside when a lightning bolt knocked him to the ground.  Unconscious for 20 minutes he struggled inside and upon awakening from a nap went to his kitchen and read an inscription on a  plaque and identified the time on a clock. Two days later his sight was restored and after additional examinations, he was cured.  In addition to his returning eyesight, his hearing was restored. The chicken didn't make it.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Brockenspectre" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-brockenspectre-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-brockenspectre-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 9 Feb 2017 5:55:42 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Episodes of fog for our Baton Rouge and the surrounding area are more numerous in the months of December through April. Fog is classified according to the varied processes involved in their formation such as radiation fog, advection fog and evaporation fog. Other fog names fall under the banner of these classifications such as upslope fog, sea fog and fog banks. Coastal fog is more numerous in the Hartz Mountains of Germany where visitors can experience Brockenspectre or the Spectre of the Brocken. Tourists become hikers and position themselves on this mountain range with their backs to the sun and blankets of fog below them and surrounding them. Their shadows penetrate the foggy mist for incredible distances below. The concentric rings of fogbows surround the upper parts of the tourists' shadows, creating an unusual halo.  Fogbows form when sunlight bounces off tiny water droplets in the fog.  As the sunlight begins to burn off and dissipates the heavy fog, the cloudbow or fogbow is enhanced.  Patchy fog or light fog has a visibility of more than 1,000 feet with no ceiling limitations.  Dense fog is when the visibility is less than 1,000 feet.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Cold Weather Record!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-cold-weather-record-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-cold-weather-record-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 8 Feb 2017 6:52:54 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

We're not experiencing the bone-chilling cold now but there's lots of winter remaining. As temperatures drop, the body attempts to generate more heat by shivering, a condition that increases muscle tone and heat. The record for cold weather survival began on February 2, 1967 when Canadian bush pilot Robert Gauchie ran out of fuel near the Arctic Circle.  Forced to land, he withstood temperatures of 48 degrees below zero. He wasn’t rescued for 58 days and lost 54 pounds while suffering five frostbitten toes.  Gauchie spent most of his time inside the plane, tucked under six sleeping bags and consuming raw fish and emergency rations. He was saved by a persistent rescue pilot after extensive searches were canceled. Another wintry note includes the biggest blizzard in southern New England’s history that banged Boston and coastal areas on February 6, 1978. For the first time in its 106-year-history, the Boston Globe was unable to deliver its paper.  Acts of God-The Old Farmer’s Almanac notes in its “Blizzard Hall of Fame,” the Great Snow of 1717 was a series of four storms that extended to March 7th with five feet of snow in New England. Newspaper accounts reported that 95 percent of New England’s deer population died.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Big Wind..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-big-wind-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-big-wind-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 6 Feb 2017 6:41:55 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Over the last week we have had a few days when the winds have increased to 25 miles per hour. This hardly compares with the "Wind of the Century." This was named by the British during the second week of January, 1968 as 125 mile-per-hour winds blew out of the Irish Sea causing blizzards and hurricane-force winds from England to Iran. Hundreds were injured, with at least 20  fatalities. Scotland experienced the worst with 16 causalities. Houses in Glasgow and neighboring Scottish villages were toppled, leaving hundreds homeless. At Great Dun Fell, the highest wind speed ever recorded in England and Wales was 134 mph. Destructive winds swept across Denmark, Germany and Switzerland with heavy snow in Jerusalem and a first time snowfall in Beersheba in the Negev Desert.From the wind to the ice. Years ago, years Don Briggs invented a winter sport, enjoyed by hundreds. Don is a renowned wrestling coach and years ago was working on a neighbor’s farm when he created a winter recreation in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Briggs duplicated a sport that is usually confined to steep mountains – ice climbing.  With a garden hose and shower heads he watered down a 70-foot grain silo and with temperatures ranging from zero to minus 17, and instantly created an ice mountain.  Briggs believed that if you build it they will climb it and that has certainly been the case for many years. Climbers are tethered to the silo as they straddle stalactites of ice.  In addition to the dozens of adventure seeking climbers, some as far away as China, the iced-up silos have offered an additional attraction as ice sculptures. Also, during the early days of firefighting, getting the wet stuff onto the red stuff was a task.  Bucket brigades were recognized as the best method of firefighting and “stand pipes” were positioned and attached to the municipal water systems.  Freezing weather became an obstacle to fight the fire and to prevent a frozen line, traditional fire plugs were covered with manure, tanbark or straw. As the plug evolved to the hydrant, above ground nozzles were configured to avoid mud, snow and ice. Antennas are also attached to a hydrant for firefighters to easily recognize their location in case of heavy snowfall. Years ago, we shoveled snow from sidewalks and driveways as it was also our responsibility to clear the snow from the hydrant on our property.

 

 

 


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Pat Shingleton: "The First Weatherman" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-first-weatherman--93106/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-first-weatherman--93106/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 3 Feb 2017 6:47:53 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

John Jeffries was a Boston physician, scientist, and military surgeon with the British Army during the Revolutionary War. Jeffries is recognized as the first “weatherman.”  He was an early balloonist and accompanied Jean-Pierre Blanchard in 1785 as their balloon crossed the English Channel. During the flight, Dr. Jeffries took weather readings with a thermometer, barometer, and hydrometer - to measure humidity, an electrometer - to determine electrical activity, a timepiece, compass and telescope.  He also used a ribbon and scissors to determine the rise and fall of the balloon and a pen and pencil to ascertain if thin air affected their use. Today marks his birthday in 1744, known as National Weatherman’s Day. Today is “Weatherman’s Day” and within the politically-correct natures the modifications have designated it "Weatherperson's Day." Cookies-By-Design, Alzheimer's Services and Blue-Bell Ice Cream will advance "goodies" to our weather department. Finally, David McCullough’s book, “1776”  has numerous examples of how weather conditions truly changed the course of history, sometimes to benefit Washington’s army. A passage of interest included the weather as the Continental Army crossed the Delaware River on December 26, 1776. McCullough’s description and historical journal entries replicated what recently occurred in the northeast. To surprise the elite Hessian troops in Trenton, 2,400 soldiers, marched five miles in conditions that included cold driving rain, sleet, snow and hail. Many of the soldiers had no shoes. As the blizzard evolved, white-out conditions ensued and the Commander-In-Chief encouraged his men to stay with their officers to guide them into battle. The 45 minute battle resulted in 21 Hessians deaths, 900 prisoners and only four American injuries.


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Pat Shingleton: "Plowing Season..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-plowing-season-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-plowing-season-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 2 Feb 2017 6:44:00 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Another Groundhog Day has been returned to the ground with predictions of more winter weather through mid-March, especially in the northern areas. From groundhogs to cattle for another prediction.  This is the annual ploughing season in Thailand and during the Ploughing Ceremony two sacred oxen will determine the quality of the harvest. Placed in front of the decorated oxen are rice, beans, alcohol, sesame seeds and corn. Tradition indicates that the item most selected by these beasts will determine the yield for the growing season.  If the oxen consume more sesame seeds or corn, bad weather will follow while selections of sesame seeds, alcohol and rice will provide abundant rainfall. Finally, in Greenland, native tribes, along with the Cherokee of North America and the Samoyeds of Siberia share a similar belief about rainbows. They believe that rainbows are the hems of the garments of the gods. Firefighters were unable to control a fire in 1998 along the Amazon in Roraima, Brazil.  After two months, two Shaman were asked to perform a rain ceremony and the fire was squelched.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Day in the Life" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-day-in-the-life-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-day-in-the-life-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 1 Feb 2017 6:48:51 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The movie "Groundhog Day", starring Bill Murray, depicts a Pennsylvania village in an accurate way. It's similar to the excitement of Mardi Gras in South Louisiana, complete with music, food and merriment. Punxsutawney comes from the Native American name for "ponksad-uteney," or "town of sand flies." Punxsutawney, Pa. east of Pittsburgh was settled by the Delaware Indians in 1723. The Delaware considered groundhogs honorable ancestors. The Pennsylvania Dutch, and their appropriate name "Deutsch" is of German rather than Dutch origin. They advanced the folklore of the groundhog when they settled the area in the late 1700s. A weather diary going back to Feb.4, 1841, had this entry. "Last Tuesday, the 2nd, was Candlemas day, the day on which according to the Germans, the Groundhog peeps out of his winter quarters and if he sees his shadow, he pops back for another six weeks nap, but if the day be cloudy, he remains out, as the weather is to moderate." Our own Chief Meteorologist, Josh Eachus, is a graduate of California University of Pennsylvania and is on the Board of Selectors for future Groundhogs in Punxsutawney and is very familiar with this event. Josh will officially and exclusively announce the results on Tune-In at 5:00 AM on WBRZ, Channel 2. During my tenure at WIIC-TV/WPXI-TV in Pittsburgh our coverage included the festivities surrounding the event. During my weather presentation years ago, I noticed Phil being extracted from his  coveted confines, placed before the cameras and noticing Punxsutawney Phyllis! The forecast then? Six more groundhogs! 


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Pat Shingleton: "Wakin'" Up Phil http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wakin-up-phil/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wakin-up-phil/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 31 Jan 2017 9:44:35 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania attracts thousands on February 2. Directly related to a single event, tourism has become one of the leading industries for this community,  Thursday morning, the groundhog will be  “extracted” from his sleep, held before the crowd and then asked to make a prediction based upon his shadow. Each year, PETA or People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals contend that this action traumatizes Phil and believe Phil should be replaced with an “animatronics model.” Representatives of the Inner Circle of the Punxsutawney Groundhog Club believe Phil is treated better than the average child, kept in a climate controlled environment and annually inspected. An animatronics model is similar to the gopher that what was used in the movie Caddy Shack. With cloud cover in Central Pennsylvania tomorrow morning, Phil probably will not witness a shadow and his prognostication will identify six more weeks of wintry weather. Keep in mind Phil’s accuracy factor since 1867 is around 39%.  Over the year’s, Phil has seen his shadow 103 times, has not seen it 18 times and didn’t have a report nine times.  Phil Pastelok is recognized as an expert long-range meteorologist with AccuWeather.com’s Long-Range Forecasting Team and commented after the famous groundhog disclosed the forecast.  Pastelok believes that the next 180 days will be similar to the Groundhog Day movie – practically the same.  Possibly two big snow storms will hit the East. Potential flooding could occur in portions of the Tennessee Valley.  Abnormally warm Gulf Coast air could activate severe weather for our area into March. An above normal outbreak of tornadoes are possible from Louisiana to western Georgia and Tennessee.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Winter of '66 and Snowballs." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-winter-of-66-and-snowballs-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-winter-of-66-and-snowballs-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 30 Jan 2017 4:58:07 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The end of January, 1966 was super cold in Baton Rouge.  On January 29, 1966, the mercury slipped to 20 degrees for the coldest temperature for the date.  On January 30, 1966, it dropped to 15, setting another record.  The true freezing point of water is known as the ice point and in 1966 the final days of January found the daytime highs staying below the freeze or ice point. Years ago I worked with an engineer, John White, who filmed the freezing weather  in ’66 on a frozen City Park Lake. I used the video in the 70s and 80s to commemorate the date showcasing many Baton Rougeans donning their ice skates for the skating extravaganza. Closing out with another winter story.  George Seaman raised Beagle dogs for rabbit hunting in the woods of Pennsylvania. George designed a dog pen that included pens at one end and an elevated open area that afforded them a place where they could “do their business.” The meshed pen allowed the dog droppings to fall through the bottom to the ground below. Our snowball battles stretched between the Minnet and Sudano yards, criss-crossing George’s property. The rules of engagement stressed that no “foreign objects” could be injected into a snowball, such as stones and gravel.  My brother Kevin abided by the rules but creatively inserted the frozen “do-do” from George’s beagles into the snowball. His direct hit on Johnnie Cornelius’ noggin’ met with the delight of many. Johnnie wasn’t a favorite in the neighborhood.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Seven Worst Nations..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-seven-worst-nations-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-seven-worst-nations-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 27 Jan 2017 7:00:00 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Our natural disasters were unprecedented in 2016 recognizing the deadly tornadoes in Convent followed by the flooding episode in March and of course the worst rain event in the history of the United States that inundated the Felicianas, East Baton Rouge Parish, Livingston, Ascension and Assumption Parishes. More than 30 inches of measured rain in 25 hours ravaged Denham Springs and other communities.  eenews.net reports that natural disasters throughout the world have increased from less than 400 from 1980 to 1982 to nearly 900 from 2013 to 2015.  In 2015 there were 346 reported disasters that were responsible for more than 22,000 deaths and $66.5 billion in damages.  The Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society ranked seven nations according to their risk with respect to natural disasters that include storms, drought and earthquakes. World Risk Report's Matthias Garschagen is its director and noted that the risk level is not only attributed to incidents of severe storms, drought and earthquakes but due also to inadequate roads, power lines and infrastructure.  The report compares these inadequacies with the exposures to storms, ocean surges, earthquakes, and tsunamis.  The top five riskiest nations are: Tonga, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Bangladesh. The safest nation in the world is Qatar and the United States is ranked 127th.


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Pat Shingleton: "Welcoming the Coal Truck" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-welcoming-the-coal-truck-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-welcoming-the-coal-truck-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 26 Jan 2017 10:30:23 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

I recently delved into the workings of a coal furnace and its benefits and... disadvantages. Coal was needed to fuel the fire and the arrival of the coal truck was a treat for me and my brother Kevin. With faces pressed against a living room window that looked-out over our side yard, we knew the truck was there when the driver rapped on the back door to announce his delivery.  Just like the mail-man, egg-man and insurance-man, the "coal-man" positioned his dump truck adjacent to the basement “coal” window.” His metal chute was attached to the exterior as he pushed a lever to open a back panel. Once the truck bed was elevated, here came the coal.  For us it was the excitement of watching a dump truck dump and the sound of the coal funneling down the chute, through the window that we could hardly see and rumbling below us into the coal cellar. It sounded like bowling balls hitting a tin roof.  The only way the coal-man made his delivery was “if” the ground was frozen. A stuck truck was even more exciting for us and not to the delight of our grandfather and father.


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Pat Shingleton: "Super Frosty and Sled Riding" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-super-frosty-and-sled-riding-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-super-frosty-and-sled-riding-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 25 Jan 2017 10:44:51 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

 

The end of January tends to be boring for residents in snow covered regions.  A variety of outdoor activities from snow skiing to snow mobiling seem to ease the boredom. It seems that each year we receive another report of a unique snowman. An example is a few years ago when a 15-foot “Frosty the Snowman” was constructed in three hours and was fashioned with over sized twig arms, beef jerky cans for eyes and a Brillo pad mouth. In March of 1988, Myron L. Ace entered the Guinness Book of World Records by constructing a 63.5 foot snowman in Anchorage, Alaska.  Myron’s giant sculpture was finalized with the assistance of eight friends, one of whom was a skilled crane operator who lifted 8-inch snow blocks to shape the snowman. Named “Super Frosty” it took three weeks to complete. Upon its completion, Anchorage was blasted with a 70 m.p.h. dust storm that turned the masterpiece into “Super Brown Frosty.” For me it was snow episodes from December through April with lots of  sled-riding. It was all "down-hill" with a sled, toboggan, aluminum saucer or garbage can lid. Overnight, Nicky Sudano would coat the trail with water, creating an ice layer that increased speed, but perturbed drivers attempting to get up-the-hill. After the big snow it was meltdown time when sled-riding powder changed to squishy snow which was perfect for snowballs and forts. A bowling ball size of snow was rolled into a boulder. Once stacked end-to-end and vertically, a compartment for battle was ready. Both forts were about 20 feet apart with armies divided between the Shingleton's, Sudano's, Minett's and the Kelly's. It ended when paperboy Donnie Schlemmer was bombarded as he delivered the Ellwood City Ledger.


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Pat Shingleton: "Praying for Glaciers, Walking on Water..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-praying-for-glaciers-walking-on-water-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-praying-for-glaciers-walking-on-water-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 24 Jan 2017 10:37:35 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

In 1678, the towns of Fieschertal and Fiesch, located in the Swiss Alps, were flooded because of the Aletsch glacier.  The flooding empowered residents to take a formal vow, praying that the Aletsch glacier would stop growing.  In addition to the prayer intentions, an annual procession was initiated to reduce the ice mass.  For more than 300 years, the glacier has shrunk at a moderate rate thus reducing the threat of flooding.  Scientists determined that the glacier decreased 3.5 kilometers over three centuries. Experiencing a lack of fresh water, residents have reversed their prayer intentions and are now praying for the glacier’s growth that included, years ago, an intervention from Pope Benedict XVI which is similar to the original vow sent to Pope Innocent XI. Finally, in 2007, scientist Doron Nof published in the Journal of Paleolimnology a possible explanation for the New Testament story of Jesus walking on water. As noted in a previous Weather News, The Sea of Galilee, known as Lake Kinneret, could have experienced “springs ice.”  Springs ice occurs during a period of frigid temperatures over calm lakes or ponds.  The frigid temperatures mix with salty plumes, creating springs ice. It appears as a small patch of ice floating on the surface of a lake. According to Nof, the ice could have created the appearance of Jesus walking over the water. He believes that this freezing process could have happened a few times during the last 12,000 years, occurring at Lake Kinneret between 2,550 and 1,500 years ago.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Worst Glaze Event..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-worst-glaze-event-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-worst-glaze-event-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 23 Jan 2017 10:30:53 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Geophysical Research Letters reported that trees aren’t dependent on rain for survival.  Despite the lack of rainwater,  a forest in the Dhofar Mountains of Oman  survive by utilizing moisture from occasional fog. Years ago, researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology determined that the forest is a “water-limited seasonal cloud forest” where moisture from passing clouds and ground fog seeps into the ground and stays until it is needed.  The only threat to this unusual forest is the camels that graze in the area.  These beasts traditionally consume large amounts of foliage that could stunt the trees’ ability to absorb the moisture. Your friends and relatives in west Virginia and Pennsylvania may be experiencing a wintry mix today. Glaze is a coating of transparent ice that forms when super-cooled water droplets hit roads during below-freezing weather.  Glaze is heavy, sticks to objects that it coats, contains no air bubbles and appears clear and smooth like glass.  When freezing rain hits a cold object, glaze can layer several inches thick causing dangerous driving conditions. The Great Southern Glaze Storm of 1951 occurred at the end of January and was one of the most destructive in history. It covered the South in a sheath of ice that was 100 miles wide from Louisiana to West Virginia and remains as the costliest winter storm on record with an estimated $100 million in damage. It exceeds all other single storm damage except for hurricanes.


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Pat Shingleton: "The U.P of Michigan and the Greenland Block" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-u-p-of-michigan-and-the-greenland-block-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-u-p-of-michigan-and-the-greenland-block-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 20 Jan 2017 10:30:58 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:


My recent reference of  Erie, PA as the “mistake on the Lake”  reminded me of an e-mail that I received from George Lane and a similar location. Years ago he wrote “your reference to the "Mistake on the Lake" is surpassed by Michigan Tech, located on the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.”  The peninsula extends into Lake Superior, less than 50 miles from Canada.  Chuck noted that the location of the “U.P.” of Michigan provides lake effect snow from three direction and is the reason for nearly 200 inches of snow per year. Numerous episodes of winter weather in the country could be attributed to the “Greenland Block.” This feature is a buckle in the jet stream, a river of air between 25,000 and 35,000 feet, positioned above Greenland.  The “block” traditionally shows up a few times each winter, lasting for a couple of weeks. There have been winters when it hasn’t been identified.  Its position drives cold air into the eastern United States from central Canada and blocks big storms from sliding up the coast.  A shift in the “block” has actually created an avenue to permit winter storms to blast New England then returning to its traditional location when the storms depart.  We can expect additional episodes of cold, rainy weather well into February. 


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Pat Shingleton: "Deadly Inaugural Weather" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-deadly-inaugural-weather-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-deadly-inaugural-weather-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 19 Jan 2017 10:30:48 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Rough weather has often accompanied the inaugural celebrations but not the case today.  Pockets of rain are expected with cloudy skies and temperatures in the 50s.  In 1841, President Harrison gave a lengthy speech, rode a horse from the Capitol with no hat or overcoat. The newly elected president caught a cold that advanced into pneumonia. In those days antibiotics were not invented and ailments from this condition caused serious complications. President Harrison died a month later. In 1853, President Pierce was sworn in during a blizzard. 0utgoing President Fillmore’s wife was in attendance, caught a cold that developed into pneumonia and also died days later. President Taft's ceremony went inside due to ten inches of snow in 1909. Trees toppled, and streets were clogged as six-thousand workers cleared 58,000 tons of snow. In 1937, F.D.R., rode to the White House in an open car with an inch of water on the floor of the vehicle after a record 1.77" of rain.


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