WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2015, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Sat, 31 Jan 2015 09:01:51 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Snow Block" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-snow-block-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-snow-block-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 30 Jan 2015 3:57:33 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Friday's column shared the wintry weather in Erie, Pennsylvania. Gannon University was located adjacent to the Lake on Perry Square. Our fraternity house was blocks away from campus. Visiting with my frat brothers: Pete Fresina, Dennis Noble, Swede Carlson, Ernie DeSantis, Jim Suppa, "Bullwhip" Wilkins, Eddie Engelmire, Rick Moran and Tony Pasquale, I remembered grasping the ropes stretched between the maples that afforded us a means of getting to class during a "white-out." Our other options were "Sup" Suppa and "Bear" Hughes. These big guys blocked the wind and snow as we huddled behind. Our "profs" complained that we smelled of beer. Bear and Sup were wearing their Erie Beer Budweiser jackets enroute to make their deliveries.


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Pat Shingleton: "Good Foam, Bad Foam..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-good-foam-bad-foam-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-good-foam-bad-foam-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 28 Jan 2015 3:57:43 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Coastal homes in the northeast are coated with ice from Tuesday's monster storm. Sea water contains dissolved salts, proteins, fats, and dead algae and is laced with organic matter and sea creature excrement. Shaking seawater in a beaker causes surface bubbles and foam. This is replicated when the ocean is agitated from wind and waves. Each coast manufactures its foam in different ways and algae blooms create thick sea foams, similar to shaving cream. This may occur this weekend in New England. When the blooms decay offshore the algal matter is churned by the surf. As noted in a previous column, most sea foam is safe, however, on the Gulf Coast, blooms of Karenia brevis create aersol toxins that irritates eyes with respiratory afflictions.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Windy Recital" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-windy-recital-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-windy-recital-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 27 Jan 2015 3:29:29 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Tuesday's column noted the intense winds in the Pyrenees Mountains, an area referred to as Ampurden. Salvador Dali believed he could harvest this wind and power a pipe organ. More than 20 years after his death, Spanish entrepreneurs fulfilled Dali's dream by constructing a giant wind-powered organ, originally designed by Dali. Engineers at Ramon Llull University in Barcelona built two prototypes. A wind accumulator collected the wind in a giant funnel that is pushed into a pressure regulator that blows through 500 pipes within the organ. The accumulator factored the wind's unpredictability and lets the organ play itself on windy days with the organist playing it on calmer days. It is located and played near Dali's birthplace of Figueras.


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Pat Shingleton: "Wind and a Pipe Organ..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wind-and-a-pipe-organ-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wind-and-a-pipe-organ-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 26 Jan 2015 3:26:24 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In addition to the winter storm warning a hurricane force wind warning is posted for the northeast. Ampurdan is locagted in northeastern Spain where intense winds blow from the Pyrenees. High pressure downslopes air through mountain passes and is rapidly warmed by compression. As noted in a previous column, these winds fascinated artist Salvado Dali and believed they could be used for another unusual purpose. Residents believed the winds were so strong they could drive a man insane, referring to it as "tramontane." Before his death, 27 years ago, Dali believed he could utilize wind to power a pipe organ, which would be heard and appreciated by residents throughout this region of Spain. Tomorrow we'll report on how the idea was accomplished.


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Pat Shingleton: "Sneaux Days" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-sneaux-days-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-sneaux-days-/ Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 25 Jan 2015 9:08:18 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Another Nor'easter has smacked New England. Heavy snowfall, in our younger years, closed schools and afterfulfilling the directive of clearing walks and driveways, it was sled riding time. The starting point of the trail was Windover Avenue, taking us over Longview Drive, across Aunt Mae's yard, to the woods below. By sanding the rust from the rails of the Radio Flyer, the trip was slicker. A coat of parafin or candle wax slicked the skids even more.A downhill run was exhilarating but going back was a task. Mom made us wear so much clothing it was difficult to move about. At the bottom was a bonfire with foil wrapped apples and potatoes, tucked into the coals. What followed was a melt down and snowball fights. More in tomorrow's column.


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Pat Shingleton: "Thawing Before Playing" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-thawing-before-playing-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-thawing-before-playing-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 23 Jan 2015 3:00:04 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Miriam Johnson was our piano teacher and her three worst students were me and my brothers Denis and Michael. More interested in sports than classical music, it was a challenge for Mom to ensure that daily practices were completed. As noted in a previous column, Saturday morning's lesson began with a mile walk to Miriam's house on Spring Avenue in all types of weather. January winter's were tricky regardless how "bundled" you were for the journey. Inevitably our hands were fresh frozen when we reached the door of her home. Therapy for hands included a regimen of running cold water onto your digits, followed by warm water then hot water. I'm not sure if extra "water" fees were added to our lesson charges before we "tickled the ivories."


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Pat Shingleton: "Purgas, Burans and Whiteouts" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-purgas-burans-and-whiteouts-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-purgas-burans-and-whiteouts-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 22 Jan 2015 3:51:27 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Extreme blizzard conditions where blowing and falling snow reduces visibilities to the point where the sky and the ground appear totally white is a whiteout. New Mexico and portions of Texas experienced these conditions Thursday. One of the fiercest blizzards occurring in the world is the purga or poorga that rolls across northern Siberia. With below zero temperatures, it includes wind-driven snow that causes disorientation. It also prevents humans from opening their eyes, the inability to breath and freezing to death within a few yards of their homes. A buran is a violent snowstorm that occurs in Southern Russia and sections of Siberia. With an injection of warmer air, a buran fills the air with blinding snow much worse than a whiteout.


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Pat Shingleton: "El Nino UpDate" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-el-nino-update-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-el-nino-update-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 21 Jan 2015 3:54:56 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The National Weather Service, working in conjunction with the International Research Institute for Climate Society have initiated their yearly El Nino watch. The term used for the warming of the Equatorial waters of the Pacific, off the west coast of South America, is "ENSO" or "El Nino Southern Oscillation." Experts monitor sea surface temperatures across the equatorial Pacific and above normal readings can indicate more tropical storms. After February, chances of El Nino development decline and become "ENSO-neutral." Temperatures did increase in October and November but didn't alter atmospheric patterns while in December, temperatures decreased. Computer forecast models are suggesting limited changes from now until May.


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Pat Shingleton: "Sky Watching..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-sky-watching-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-sky-watching-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 20 Jan 2015 3:58:25 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

An elderly lady from Gonzales left a voice-message believing that her eyes deceived her. She noted, "There's a rainbow against the Sun!" She continued, "I need to know what this is, I thought that maybe I cracked!" What she experienced Monday was a halo or sundog. Ice crystals in the upper atmosphere act as prisms and when sunlight, or moonlight passes through the crystals the rays bend or refract. The most common angle of refraction is 22 degrees and when bright patches form they are sundogs. Harvey Schwartzberg experienced an extraordinary display of light in the Eastern sky Monday evening. I mentioned it on my weathercast. Avid astronomer Norm Ryan verified that it was Jupiter as refraction came into play again causing "rippled" light.


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Pat Shingleton: "Water Carriers-Eddies..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-water-carriers-eddies-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-water-carriers-eddies-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 19 Jan 2015 3:50:22 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Mesoscale eddies are spinning bodies of water that grow as large as 500 kilometers in diameter. These eddies can also exist from days to months before being absorbed into surrounding water. Scientists at the University of Hawaii reviewed satellite data from 1992 through 2010. Their research matched the data with floating sensors that identified the eddies by their shape, volume and temperatures. The results concluded that eddies mostly moved westward, carrying more than 30 million tons of water every second to the east coast of continents. This amount of water was originally thought to be transported by large ocean currents. University of Hawaii's research could significantly assist in locating ocean heat and dissolving carbon transfers.


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Pat Shingleton: "Waxing Poetic" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-waxing-poetic-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-waxing-poetic-/ Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 18 Jan 2015 11:04:21 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In the 1880s, Dr. Charles Fleet invented Chapstick. The tubular ointment contains camphor, bees wax, menthol, petrolatum, phenol and aloe. Chapstick sales increase during the winter months. One ingredient was used for another treatment. Personal hygiene, couldn't match today's regimens, as acne and smallpox scars, developed in adulthood, were treated with bee's wax. Women would layer their faces with bee's wax to fill and smooth their complexion. During "gossipy" conversation or "staring," a customary retort was "mind your own bee's wax." A smiling face, loaded with wax dried wax initiated another term, "crack a smile." Finally, sitting too close to the fireplace began the a similar expression, "you are losing face."


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Pat Shingleton: Dropping the Grate..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dropping-the-grate-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dropping-the-grate-/ Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 17 Jan 2015 8:23:18 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Dropping the Grate...

Before gas furnaces, many relied on the coal furnace. From the basement of the home the burning coal heated an iron "bell" that radiated heat into the rest of the home through a network of insulated ducts. As noted in a previous column, the radiated heat ultimately made it into registers that warmed the rooms and the house. Before bedtime it was the duty of my father, grandfather and later us, to stoke the fire and layer coal to provide some overnight warmth. Eventually, the grate that held the coal ashes sifted into a chamber that was cleaned on a daily basis. Traditionally, our grandfather would "drop the grate" on Saturday afternoons to remove the remaining ashes and to provide more heat than needed, while he enjoyed his bath.


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Pat Shingleton: "My First Column..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-my-first-column-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-my-first-column-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 16 Jan 2015 3:54:32 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On this date in 1999, the first column of "Weather News" appeared on the "back-side" of the Advocate's "B" section. As noted in a previous column, I hounded Linda Lightfoot until she acquiesced with special thanks to the Smiley Anders School of Column Writing. Thanks to the readers for permitting me to extended tidbits in 5,491 columns. The first column reminisced about my first "news" experience - a "paper-boy" for the Pittsburgh Post Gazette. Subscribers had aluminum doors and when the Gazette was folded and thrown, the bang from the bottom panel provided a clear signal of the paper's arrival. During inclement weather it was sandwiched between the storm and regular door. Some subscribers had a separate paper box adjacent to the mail box.


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Pat Shingleton: "On the Run..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-on-the-run-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-on-the-run-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 15 Jan 2015 4:48:09 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

I'm stealing the thunder of my colleague Josh Eachus who posted an interesting column on ideal running conditions. French researchers found that thermometers registering readings in the lower 40s produce the fastest marathon times. This was determined by examining running times for 1.8 million participants over a 10-year period. Faster runners that generate more body heat also performed better when readings registered in the upper 30s. Josh referenced Alex Hutchinson of "Runner's World." Hutchinson noted the correlation of weather in the fall and spring and the fastest times. Courses with hills actually produce better times than easier, flatter courses due to ideal temperatures. Perfect conditions are expected for this weekend's marathon.


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Pat Shingleton "Sully's Landing" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-sully-s-landing-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-sully-s-landing-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 14 Jan 2015 3:57:06 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton

A storm system on January 14, 2009 sent gusty winds to New York City with light snow. On January 15th, calm, cold weather occurred. Due to de-icing in Pittsburgh, US Airways Flight 1549 left LaGuardia Airport at 3:25 p.m. bound for Charlotte. Less than 2 minutes after takeoff, at an altitude of 2,900 feet, a flock of Canadian geese struck the aircraft knocking-out both engines and sending the 150,000 pound Airbus A320 gliding. The plane was descending over the Bronx at 1,000 feet per minute and the plane's Captain made a decision never before performed - ditching in the Hudson River. Captain Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger and First Officer, Jeff Skiles, safely off-loaded their passengers in 35 degrees and a wind chill value of 11 degrees.


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Pat Shingleton: "Bone Dry" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bone-dry-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bone-dry-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 13 Jan 2015 3:54:38 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The Atacama Desert is located in the upper reaches of Chile in South America. The desert extends from the Peruvian border to the town of Copiapo. To the west is the Pacific Ocean and to the east, the high central Andes, spanning 100 miles at its widest section. As noted in a previous column, the yearly precipitation amounts vary in the desert with the wettest locations receiving only 3 millimeters yearly. For 65 years the coastal town of Arica, on the northern section of the desert, yielded an average rainfall of 0.5 millimeter. From October 1903 through January 1918 not one drop of rain fell on Arica. It's the driest desert on Earth and December through March temperatures rarely exceed 90 degrees. Tutunendo, Columbia, is the rainiest.


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Pat Shingleton: "Follow the Light" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-follow-the-light-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-follow-the-light-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 12 Jan 2015 3:52:07 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The Aurora Borealis is never witnessed in south Louisiana but is often viewed in northern regions. Also known as Northern Lights, highly charged electrons from solar wind interact with a variety of atmospheric elements, including gas and dust. These particles, at various levels of the atmosphere, create the spectacular colors of the Aurora Borealis. Tonight at the Louisiana Art and Science Museum, Director Jon Elvert will showcase a presentation on the beauty and science of auroras beginning at 7:00 PM. Attendees will view all of the northern lights from the comfort of their planetarium seats. Japanese tourists visit Fairbanks, Alaska, during Aurora season. Conceiving a child, in the dark, and under the lights, may produce a gifted child.


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Pat Shingleton: As Slow As Molasses http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-as-slow-as-molasses/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-as-slow-as-molasses/ Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 10 Jan 2015 3:42:13 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: As Slow As Molasses

Today marks the anniversary of "America's most fascinating and surreal disaster." As noted in a previous column, on January 11, 1919, Boston's Daily Globe reported that "a cold air mass settled in." The following morning, the mercury tumbled from 36 degrees to 20 at 2:00 p.m to 7 degrees at 10:00 p.m.; then 2 degrees. Crews from the ship Miliero pumped a half million gallons of molasses from its warm hold into tanks holding existing cold molasses causing a bubbling churn; vibrating the tank's walls. Workers reported the walls were groaning. This process activated fermentation, aided by a temperature rise to 50. Then the top of the 58 foot tank blew and a 50 foot wave of 2 million gallons rushed over the streets killing 21, injuring 150.


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Pat Shingleton: "Pooch in the Basement!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-pooch-in-the-basement-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-pooch-in-the-basement-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 9 Jan 2015 3:08:47 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Friday morning offered another example of winter weather preparations. In addition to the household tasks of protecting vegetation, pets and pipes, transportation authorities prepared for episodes of icing and glazing. Referring to pets, during our younger years, an expected blast of Canadian air meant that our "outside dog," Pooch, was permitted to spend the cold evenings in our basement. We called him Pooch, Mom called him Poochie and our grandfather referred to his as Shiner. Getting him to the basement was often challenging. Once let loose, he acted like an escaped prisoner. Gramps would corral him by yelling, "Here Shiner, here Shiner, ya, ya." Pooch enjoyed sleeping next to Uncle Emery upon his late night return from the Elks Club.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Blizz in Blizzard" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-blizz-in-blizzard-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-blizz-in-blizzard-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 8 Jan 2015 3:55:20 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

There could be episodes of blizzards as we advance through the Winter season. "Blizzard" originally meant "a stunning blow," often referred to a boxer's knockout punch. Davy Crockett, no relation to Jennifer, used the word in reference to a barrage of rifle shot as a deer to "taking a blizzard" to his prey. As noted in a previous column, on March 24, 1870, the editor of the Iowa newspaper, The Easterville Vindicator, described a massive wind-driven snow event as a blizzard. He compared the event to a severe snowstorm that "K.O.'ed" the city. The following Spring, an Iowa baseball team changed its name to the "Blizzards" and within ten years, numerous papers from New York to Canada were referencing storms as blizzards.


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