WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Weather - Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2014, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Tue, 2 Sep 2014 06:09:49 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: That Splash is a Biggin http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-that-splash-is-a-biggin/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-that-splash-is-a-biggin/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 31 Aug 2014 2:30:01 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: That Splash is a Biggin

A Labor Day tradition was an invitation from Leonard "Dutch" Shultz. He had a backyard swimming pool and before episodes of Indian Summer, the day was usually hot. Guests contributed a variety of summertime recipes. Their adjacent yard provided additional space for related activities but the pool was the place-to-be. The Labor Day Party included a seasonal event that got everyone's attention in sight and sound. Dorothy "Dot" Biggins was a robust lady with a robust personality to match. When the pool was filled with kids and adults, Dot sped down the side of the pool, went airborne and performed the greatest "cannonball" ever witnessed. The sound was incredible, the splash enormous. Dutch kept a hose "at-the-ready" to refill the pool.


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Pat Shingleton: "Hemmed pants and rising water..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hemmed-pants-and-rising-water-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hemmed-pants-and-rising-water-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 30 Aug 2014 2:49:55 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The first day of school, "way back when," was the day-after Labor Day. Our school year schedule didn't include "days-off" for Mardi Gras and "Spring Breaks." Like most families we subscribed to the traditions of new school clothes, and lunch buckets. Before backpacks, an old belt transported our books for "night work" or better known as home work. School clothes were purchased from Zayre's, an inexpensive store chain that met our parents budgetary school needs. Mom insisted that our trouser length be longer than needed. She would "hem them up," and "un-hem" them as the school year progressed. The hem lines were evidence of our increasing height, inch-by-inch. I used the trouser hem lines to measure and catalog monthly rainfall totals.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Unnamed Storm..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-unnamed-storm-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-unnamed-storm-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 29 Aug 2014 4:02:36 PM Pat Shingleton Hurricanes Andrew, Camille, Betsy, Gustav and Rita became the comparative storms as we move forward. Another storm was chronicled in a book released in 2008, entitled "Hemingway's Hurricane: The Great Florida Keys Storm of 1935" by Phil Scott. It's called Hemingway's Hurricane because the famous author lived 80 miles southwest of Key West where he rode out the storm and journaled his experiences from August 30th to September 4th, 1935. Scott's angle on the book includes the lives of 700 World War I veterans who relocated to Florida in 1925 under the Federal Emergency Relief Organization to assist in public works projects. This storm ravaged three veteran's camps causing more than 400 deaths; long before lead-time alerts and evacuations.


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Pat Shingleton: "The 'K' Storm..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-k-storm-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-k-storm-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 28 Aug 2014 4:01:19 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The column today includes an excerpt, presented nine years ago on this date and Katrina's landfall. "After 48 hours of on-air coverage of Katrina, this devastating, catastrophic storm, some comments. In every hurricane conference attended, the New Orleans "model" has occurred. The worst-case scenario Monday morning mirrored expectations of the Hurricane Center in Miami. Numerous storms have skirted and hit New Orleans including: the October 10, 1837 Hurricane, the September 22, 1909 Hurricane, the October 2, 1915 Hurricane and the September 6, 1948 Hurricane. Named storms include Hilda in October-1964, Betsy-September 12, 1965, Fern-September, 1971, Bob-July 12, 1979, Elena-September 2,1965, Juan-October 29, 1985 and Florence-Sept. 9, 1988.


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Pat Shingleton: "Isaac Replaced Allison..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-isaac-replaced-allison-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-isaac-replaced-allison-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 27 Aug 2014 3:46:26 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Residents of LaPlace remember this date in 2012. Four storms have impacted the Baton Rouge area. Andrew in 1992 shut down our city and Katrina's devastation transported thousands of folks to Baton Rouge. Gustav was the worst storm to hit the city and is known as the hurricane that toppled more trees than any other in history. Six months after the storm, tree removal processing continued. Two years ago, Hurricane Isaac made landfall at 6:45 PM at the Mouth of the Mississippi River then beached again the following morning southeast of Houma. It was the ninth tropical cyclone of the season and the fourth hurricane of 2012. Isaac's storm surge and rain replaced Tropical Storm Allison as the worst flooding storm to hit our area and LaPlace.


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Pat Shingleton: "August, September-Rough Months..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-august-september-rough-months-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-august-september-rough-months-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 26 Aug 2014 3:52:18 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

We'll watch three areas, one in the Gulf and two systems in the Atlantic. The months August and September hold the distinction as the worst months for hurricanes and tropical storms for Louisiana. On August 26, 1992, Hurricane Andrew made landfall 20 miles southwest of Morgan City. It ranked number 4 as the most intense land falling United States hurricane, based upon its central pressure. The "Labor Day" Hurricane of 1935 ranks number one. On August 17, 1969, Hurricane Camille ranked second, when it lashed Plaquemines Parish. Its center of circulation made official landfall in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. Prior to Katrina, Camille was considered the comparative storm or "benchmark" hurricane whereby other Gulf Coast storms were measured.


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Pat Shingleton: "Dumspter Diving..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dumspter-diving-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dumspter-diving-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 25 Aug 2014 3:56:28 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

With access to a variety of weather resources, opinions are easily advanced via social media. Observers can access radar, satellites and forecast models, putting them in the eye of the storm from their home. In 1977, while at the "other" station, my friend and co-worker, Grey Hammett, retrieved four-hour-old satellite pictures from the National Weather Service Office in New Orleans on his return trip to Baton Rouge. Two years ago, Ryan Wade, then a PhD candidate at the University of Alabama-Huntsville, posted a paper on hurricane forecasting. He noted a resurgence of budding meteorologists combing through trash cans at Weather Service Offices. They're retrieving Hurricane Hunter Data of crumpled, satellite photos, just as I did 37 years ago.


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Pat Shingleton: End-of-August Storms http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-end-of-august-storms/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-end-of-august-storms/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 24 Aug 2014 2:48:12 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: End-of-August Storms

Before Katrina, Hurricane Andrew was the costliest hurricane in U.S. history. On this date, two years ago, we were tracking Tropical Storm Isaac. Gustav was the worst storm to hit Baton Rouge. Andrew recorded five official landfalls including its final landing as a category 3 storm on our coast. Storms that cause extensive destruction are sealed in our memories. Tonight, 22 years ago, I was in our Weather Center while outside, howling winds swayed our 700 foot antenna. After landfall and the last tornado warning, I left the station to check on the family. Similar to Gustav, Old Goodwood resembled a logging site with oak trees strewn like pick-up sticks, intermingled with transformers and power poles; the first storm of the season - in August.


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Pat Shingleton: A Big Reservoir Down http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-big-reservoir-down/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-big-reservoir-down/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 23 Aug 2014 2:48:57 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: A Big Reservoir  Down

On a visit to Las Vegas in 2012, we enjoyed a visit to the Hoover or Boulder Dam and Lake Mead. Hydrologists report that 63 trillion gallons of ground water have been lost in the West due to drought. Lake Mead is at its lowest level since the Hoover Dam was constructed in the 1930s. NBC News reports that big water consumers, like California, may find its water rationed if weather conditions remain the same or worsen. The lake is the largest reservoir in America and visitors to it can identify distinctive "bathtub rings" that validate the significant drop in water levels. Above average moisture upstream, in Colorado, will rise Lake Mead in the Fall. Similar to Lake Veret , and False River, Lake Mead is a playground for boating enthusiasts.


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Pat Shingleton: "House Wind..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-house-wind-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-house-wind-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 22 Aug 2014 4:00:35 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Once a lot is selected, the positioning of the house is determined by the prevailing wind. My grandfather stationed our Pennsylvania house in relationship to the prevailing north wind. Built in the early 1900s, his house had the front door facing west and the back door facing east. The north and south sides bore the brunt of the strong seasonal winds. Prevailing winds are winds that blow predominantly from a single general direction over a particular point on the Earth's surface. The prevailing winds in our area lean more to a south, southeast and southwest origination; northwest during winter. Roof experts recommend a roof cap away from the prevailing winds. Land falling tropical storms and hurricanes pose the worst threat for our area.


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Pat Shingleton: "What's the Word?" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-what-s-the-word-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-what-s-the-word-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 21 Aug 2014 4:34:02 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

I have used the word "Tabascoey" as another adjective for our summertime weather. A few years ago I received a call from a gentleman questioning permission to use "Tabascoey" in my weather forecasts and this column. After numerous barbs, jokes and kidding, he identified himself as the late Paul McIlhenney from the McIlhenny family of New Iberia and Avery Island and of course our famous Tabasco sauce. A conversation Monday evening, on the anchor desk, found Mike Cauble and Michael Marsh comparing other hot weather adjectives. The list included: peppery, stuffy, close, collar pullin', ovenlike, a furnace, bakin', broilin', sizzlin', a sizzler, fiery, and sweltering. My wife Mabyn won't walk "Doggie" at night she says, "It's too gross."


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Pat Shingleton:"Charting the History of...The Charter Oak." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-charting-the-history-of-the-charter-oak-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-charting-the-history-of-the-charter-oak-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 20 Aug 2014 3:52:53 PM p Pat Shingleton:


Furthering Tuesday's column when Dutch explorer Adrian Block described an unusually large white oak growing in a clearing on what is now Hartford, Connecticut. In the 1930s, a delegation of Native Americans approached the property's owner where the tree was located. Intending to remove the tree, Samuel Wyllys preserved it because it was planted ceremonially for the sake of peace when their tribe first settled the area. Local legend states that in 1687 the cavity of the tree was cored to hide the Constitution Charter from King James II. At that moment it was renamed the "Charter Oak." August 19th marked the 158th anniversary of the famous tree and on August 21, 1856 it was severely damaged by a fierce wind storm.


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Pat Shingleton: "Flooding and a Famous Tree..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-flooding-and-a-famous-tree-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-flooding-and-a-famous-tree-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 19 Aug 2014 3:53:41 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:


The Hurricane Center in Miami could be identifying a tropical depression today or tomorrow. Many of our readers will remember this date. On August 20, 1969, clean-up from Hurricane Camille was underway. The storm caused flooding and mudslides in the James and York River basins in Virginia. Rainfall totals were 31 inches with 109 fatalities. On October 21, 1856, the 200 year-old majestic white oak tree in Hartford, CT., known as The Charter Oak was destroyed by a fierce wind storm. The tree hid the Charter from King James II in 1687. On August 12, 1984, a late afternoon thunderstorm hit Pueblo Colorado, closing the state fair for one day. Golf ball size hail popped 500 light bulbs on a carnival ride with 9 injuries and $40 million in damage.


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Pat Shingleton: "Hold It Down..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hold-it-down-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hold-it-down-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 18 Aug 2014 4:03:10 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The village of Green Bank is nestled in the Allegheny Mountain Range and may be one of the quietest places on Earth. It's the home of the Green Bank Telescope, operating under the auspices of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In 1958, the Federal Communications Commission created a 13,000-square-mile quiet zone to shield Green Bank's radio telescopes from man-made interference. The National Radio Quiet Zone borders Virginia and West Virginia. Permissible noises include car engines, wind and thunder. Cellphones, Wi-fi radio and designated electronics are regulated, protecting the largest steerable radio telescope. About half the size of the Statue of Liberty, it listens into space, gathering signals originating 14 billion years ago.


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Pat Shingleton: Following the Light http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-following-the-light/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-following-the-light/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 17 Aug 2014 1:54:36 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Following the Light

Louisiana boasts 14 lighthouses, the oldest dating back to 1839. In August, 1789, the First Congress federalized existing lighthouses. Built by the colonists, funds were appropriated for lighthouses, beacons and buoys. As noted in a previous column, the lighthouse safely directed ships through episodes of fog and storms. Sound was used to guide ships and in colonial times shore-fired cannons, warned ships away from foggy coastlines. Fog bells were first used in 1852, a mechanical bell in 1869, a fog trumpet in 1872 and an air siren in 1887. Members of the Lighthouse Service maintained the lights, performing their duties in extreme hardship. On August 7, 1939, the administration of the lighthouses was transferred to the Coast Guard.

 

 


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Pat Shingleton: Blowing Out the Candle, At the Stick http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-blowing-out-the-candle-at-the-stick/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-blowing-out-the-candle-at-the-stick/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 16 Aug 2014 2:18:24 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Blowing Out the Candle, At the Stick

The Beatles appeared there for the last time in 1966. A 6.9 earthquake happened there in 1989. It was the quietest when Pope John Paul II was there in 1987. Last Thursday, Paul McCartney performed for the final time. Candlestick Park, constructed in the late ‘50s, will become a shopping center. Noted for its windy conditions, architect John Bolles designed it for wind protection by installing a boomerang-shaped baffle in the upper tier. The installation never worked and for its first ten seasons the wind whistled in from left-center toward right center. An enclosure was added to accommodate the football 49ers but the wind became stronger and colder. The Stick, will be remembered as the windiest and coldest ball-yard in the major leagues.


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Pat Shingleton: "Geronimo!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-geronimo-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-geronimo-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 15 Aug 2014 4:22:15 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In May of 2012, Gary Connery donned a wing suit and performed a 3,000 foot base jump onto 24,000 cardboard boxes in Henley Upon Thames for a world record. On July 25, 2012, Felix Baumgartner freefell for four minutes at 536 mph, opening his chute for the worlds highest skydive. On this date in 1960, Air Force Captain Joseph Kittenger donned four layers of clothing and left New Mexico in a gondola, attached to a helium balloon. Kittenger went skyward for 19 miles and a never before attempted jump back to earth. As temperatures dipped to 100 degrees below zero he soared to 102,800 feet and parachuted. He fell for four minutes and 37 seconds and at 14,000 feet, his parachute opened and he landed safely on the desert floor.


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Pat Shingleton: "Cool Me Down With Baby Powder" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-cool-me-down-with-baby-powder-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-cool-me-down-with-baby-powder-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 14 Aug 2014 3:38:08 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Baby powder isn't just for the baby, especially at this time of the year. I shared this with our Sports Director, Mike Cauble, noting that many athletes use it before they suit up to reduce sweat and discomfort. I also told him I use the lavender, Johnson's baby powder. He told me to, "Get Lost!" We did not post a heat advisory this season but still encouraged our viewers and readers to stay hydrated and take frequent breaks. Talcum and baby powder can cool you down by sprinkling some on your bed sheets. Powder eliminates squeaky floorboards and can assist in untying the hard knot of a shoelace. I gave Mike Cauble a couple of containers of baby powder. He agreed to present them to Coach Les Miles for further verification on discomfort.


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Pat Shingleton: "Mid August Headliners..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-mid-august-headliners-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-mid-august-headliners-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 13 Aug 2014 4:01:05 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On August 14, 2004, the daytime high was 82, ten degrees under the average. An overnight low of 58 on August 15th, set a record. It was also the coolest ever from August 13th through August 18th. Our summer season has enjoyed three cool fronts: July 4th weekend, July 15th-16th, July 28th-29th. We also enjoyed a record low of 62 degrees in July as our first 90 degree high was three weeks delayed. We bopped the 95 degree mark just three times this season. Folks in Florida quickly forgot 2014 when four hurricanes hit the state within six weeks. On August 13, Hurricane Charley nailed Port Charlotte with 150 m.p.h. winds. Frances hit Orlando on September 5th and a storm we remember, Ivan, leveled Pensacola. Jeanne paid a visit on September 25th.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Storm, My Daughter..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-storm-my-daughter-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-storm-my-daughter-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 12 Aug 2014 3:58:57 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean and Atlantic are quiet but on this date in 1766, a powerful hurricane leveled the tiny village of Trois-Islets on the island of Martinique. As noted, Joseph-Gaspard Tascher was one of the island's wealthy planters and suffered total financial ruin from the devastating storm. In dire straits, he did what many attempted in those days; marrying their offspring into wealth. After the storm, his young daughter, Marie Josephine Rose, returned to France and married an army officer, the Vicomte de Beauharnais, who was guillotined in 1794. Two years later she married an officer with a better "head on his shoulders" who crowned himself in 1804. She became Empress Josephine of France, wife of Napoleon Bonaparte.


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