WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2016, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Fri, 6 May 2016 11:05:13 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Great Lakes- Part Two..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-great-lakes-part-two-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-great-lakes-part-two-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 5 May 2016 7:11:35 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Continuing yesterday's identification of the World's Strangest Lakes we head to the Caribbean and "Boiling Lake" in Dominica. A "fumarole" is an opening that releases gas and steam and boils existing water. Located in the Morne Trois Pitons National Park it takes hikers six hours to get there. In Trinidad we note Pitch Lake which is 250 feet deep and is filled with liquid and semisolid asphalt. Water, gas, mineral material and bitumen collect as this lake was mined for many years for asphalt. Pink lakes are located in numerous locations stretching from Lake Retba in Sonegal to Laguna Colorado in Bolivia. The mixture of red bright colors and sunlight give the lakes their name. Exploding lakes are found in Congo. Carbon dioxide eruptions in Lake Nyos in Cameroon in 1986 killed 2000 with losses to livestock at 3500. Beppu Hells in Japan is a top spot for spa goers as the combination of clay and hot water create red and blue shades also referred to as "Bells of Beppu." The final lake on our list is Tonie Sap in Cambodia.  The Asian River receives so much rainfall that it flows backwards.


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Pat Shingleton: "Great Lakes..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-great-lakes-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-great-lakes-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 4 May 2016 11:07:04 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Travel magazine identified twelve of the most unusual lakes in the world. Six of the twelve include Lake Kaindy near the Tien Shan Mountains in Kazakhstan. The lake developed in 1911 when an earthquake triggered a large limestone landslide.  It is referred to as the "Sunken Forest." Lake Kaikal in Russia is 25 million years old and contains 20% of the world's unfrozen fresh water and is also the home of the world's only freshwater seals. Third on the list is Gruner See in Austria.  This lake is located on the edge of the Hochschwab Mountains and rises each year by thirty feet after the spring snow melt. The Spotted Lake in Canada turns into  a psychedelic polka, displaying dotted pools of reflecting various streams of light. The lake is know for its healing powers because of its large concentrations of minerals. Jellyfish Lake in Palau is home to Golden Jellyfish that are unlike our Gulf Coast jellyfish. These jellyfish have a mild, undetectable sting as energy algae-like organisms are stored in their tentacles and are activated as they gravitate toward the rising sun. The Tri-Colored Lakes of Indonesia include craters of Mount Kelimutu on the Indonesian Island of Flores. The lake colors often change from blue to bright green to dark brown or red. More lakes and their unusual characteristics, tomorrow.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Moon and Your Garden" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-moon-and-your-garden-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-moon-and-your-garden-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 3 May 2016 11:39:29 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

When I mentioned to my brother Kevin that I was putting a few vegetables into some planters he reminded me of what our grandfather, Bert Price, would advise.  “Yunz boys better check that thar Moon phase,” said Bert. Our last full moon was Friday, April 22nd.  Every 28 days the moon goes through four phases: new moon, first quarter, full moon and “dark of the moon.”  When the moon is waxing or it appears larger, its gravitational pull is the greatest and affects not only the oceans but everything containing water. Many believe that above ground crops such as leafy vegetables do better on a waxing moon. We're now in a waning moon pattern with our next full moon targeted for May 21st. You may have noticed your vining crops, such as cucumbers, excelling. Possibly you too planted those around March 24th when another waning moon was noted. The theory also suggests that vegetables and flowers  planted on a waning moon draws more water down to the earth.For future gardening remember Bert's words, ".... better check that thar Moon phase!"


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Pat Shingleton: "An Ice Classic" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-ice-classic-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-ice-classic-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 2 May 2016 10:29:14 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The Nenana Ice Classic began in 1917 by bridge builders crossing the Tenana River new Fairbanks, Alaska.  Back then the weather changes also changed the schedules for area laborers. When the river froze-over, work stopped and speculation as to an ice break began the wagering. This classic lottery doesn't match the national payouts but it does provide speculation and excitement. Cash prizes these days are awarded to those who guess the exact minute the ice breaks. The popularity of the event also led to needed validation of the exact time and the distribution of winnings to the melt-down.  A specially constructed tripod contraption determines the winner. Originally made of wooden logs, a wire attached to the top of the device is strung to an onshore clock. The clock stops when the melting ice shifts the tripod 100 feet. Last year there were 24 tickets designating the winning time -3:48 P.M., Alaska Standard Time and the date was April 25th. The jackpot in 2015 was $ 363,627 as 300,000 tickets were sold with 24 winning tickets splitting the prize.At 3:39 PM , April 23rd, 2016 the ice melted and the clock stopped. Winners are currently being identified and contacted.

 


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Pat Shingleton: "Clearing the Desk..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-clearing-the-desk-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-clearing-the-desk-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 29 Apr 2016 7:05:33 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

It's desk, clean-off time and few items, hopefully, of interest. If a baseball at Alex Box Stadium-Skip Bertman Field is blasted into humid air it will travel father than in dry air provided the force and trajectory are the same.  If the earth were the size of a billiard ball, it would be smoother and closer to a perfect sphere.  The widest tornado ever recorded touched down in Nebraska in March 2004. At its widest point, the twister measured 2.5 miles in diameter and traveled 62 miles.  To determine the effect that sustained high temperatures have on the human body, Dr.Craig Taylor once subjected himself to 250 degrees Fahrenheit for 14 and a half minutes without serious medical complications. Discarded liners previously used to encase offshore oil-rig piping were once recognized as a model of “green” engineering and were later recycled for another important use. In tornado prone areas, storm shelters provide valuable protection and the National Storms Shelter Association  tests products to improve storm shelters. The Texas Tech Debris Impact Test Facility fired 15-pound two-by-fours from a pressure cannon that did not penetrate the panels. The wooden projectiles hit the discarded liners at 100 mph, replicating objects that exit a funnel cloud.  Applying modern materials science to storm shelters started after Hurricane Katrina and was advanced after 62 tornadoes ravaged Alabama. The newly designed panels are made of thermoplastic and fiberglass resins and fibers and are stronger per density unit than steel, currently used in shelters. Michael Cauble mentioned the gimmicks ball parks use  to entertain the crowds.  My brother Kevin and I reminisce about our trips to Forbes Field in Pittsburgh during our Little League years.  There were no gimmicks at this ball park, just baseball.  Hab Shingleton would load his sons into the station wagon and head to a double header.  Of course we had our Wilson glove with us just in case we snagged one during batting practice or during the game.  Dick Stuart was at first, Billy Maz at second, Smokey Burgess behind the plate, Roberto in right and of course the Voice of the Pirates, Bob Prince.  As for concessions - it was Mom’s meatloaf sandwiches on homemade buns and a thermos of Kool-Aid. We say goodbye to April and rewind to some interesting weather events on this date.


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Pat Shingleton; "Lightning Consequences" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lightning-consequences-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lightning-consequences-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 28 Apr 2016 10:50:57 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton;

Yesterday the National Weather Service confirmed a lightning fatality in St. Tammany Parish that occurred during the morning outbreak of storms. Around 300 A.D. a pagan father was so enraged with his daughter that he confined her to a tower and in her forced solitude she converted to Christianity.  After discovering her conversion the father also learned that she had three windows installed in a bathhouse to honor the Holy Trinity.  His first attempt to kill his daughter was unsuccessful as she escaped after an opening mysteriously appeared in the wall confining her. A shepard betrayed her and she was tortured however her wounds healed instantly. The shepard was reportedly turned to stone and his sheep to locusts. Finally, her father beheaded her and following the decapitation he was killed by lightning.  His daughter was anointed Saint Barbara Dioscorus, the patron saint of lightning victims and her Feast Day is celebrated on December 4th. British military officer, Major R. Summerford while on the battlefield in Flanders in February 1918, was knocked off his horse by a stroke of lightning, paralyzing him from the waist down. In 1924, while fishing with two friends, lightning hit him again, paralyzing his entire right side. In 1934 a third lightning strike hit him, leaving him permanently paralyzed.  Two years later he died and was buried. Just after his internment, another bolt of lightning struck the cemetery destroying the tombstone of Major Summerford.


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Pat Shingelton: "Garden Preps..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingelton-garden-preps-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingelton-garden-preps-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 27 Apr 2016 11:01:19 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingelton:

On our 4,5,6 and 10 PM weathercasts we are encouraging viewers to forward their pics of flowers and vegetables. In addition, I thought of my Mom last weekend while planting tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers in our patio pots. Container gardening wasn't popular "back in the day."  In Pennsylvania, my grandfather would “turn-over” the garden with a shovel until he was convinced to let Mr. Hollenbeck “disc it up” with his tractor. A few years ago, Mom was still able to prepare for one of her first crops of the season – rhubarb, followed by leaf lettuce, beans, tomatoes and sweet corn that should be “knee high by the Fourth of July.”  She would remove ground cover from her rhubarb and would always have a bumper crop for nearly ten years. She was the sole provider of rhubarb for the produce manager at the local Giant Eagle who compensated her “six bucks per pound.”  Sylvia Weatherspoon verifies her rhubarb pie with strawberries is the absolute best.


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Pat Shingleton: "Destructive April..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-destructive-april-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-destructive-april-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 26 Apr 2016 6:54:32 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

April is the month for tornadoes and April 3rd and 4th, 1974 is still recognized as one of the most active 24-hour periods for twisters in American history. This morning reports of destruction will be identified in Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska. This 1974 episode was identified as the "Super Outbreak," covering more than 490,000 square and destroying more than 600 square miles within three major squall lines. The death toll from this outbreak was 315 within eleven states with more than $500 million in damage. Xenia, Ohio was hardest hit with 34 deaths. Another episode was registered on April 5th and 6th, 1936, noted back then as the second deadliest outbreak on record. From Tupelo, Mississippi to the western Carolinas, 17 twisters caused 216 fatalities with $18 million in damage. Two other incidents occurred on April 11th and 12th, 1965 and April 24th and 25th, 1908. During the 1965 episode, 51 tornadoes took 256 lives and the 1908 incident reported 18 tornadoes from Louisiana to Georgia with 310 deaths. One of the longest and deadliest tornadoes traveled 158 miles from Weiss, Louisiana to Winchester, Mississippi. 


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Pat Shingleton: "Wildflower Viewing" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wildflower-viewing-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wildflower-viewing-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 25 Apr 2016 6:49:15 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Riverside High School was a relatively new high school compared to others in Western Pennsylvania and our biology teacher,  Bob Fredericks brought a level of education that his students embraced. Ironically, his mother was my fifth grade teacher at North Star School. Our advanced biology class included an assignment of collecting 50 species of insects, 50 different species of wild flowers and 50 leaves from trees within our area. Butterfly nets were provided along with a "Ball" jar laced with formaldehyde to "prepare" the bugs. Leaves were picked, pressed, mounted and identified as to class and species. As for the insects,  Darryl Smialek made the task easier by putting the top down on his convertible as we motored through the valleys with eight nets protruding from the car. Trekking through the "woods" on a beautiful Spring day with my girlfriend, Sue Welsh, accomplished the plant-collecting assignment even though her Mom and Dad were disturbed that she contracted poison ivy. The U.S. Forest Service  releases a wildflower map that identifies hundreds of locations, on and outside National Forests, for prime wildflower identifications. The map includes 317 wildflower viewing areas on National Forest System lands, referenced by state. Their website also includes more than 10,000 plant images. Regardless of your travels for our final April weekend, you can check seasonal and territorial wildflowers at: http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/viewing/.


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Pat Shingleton: The Francis Folly..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-francis-folly-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-francis-folly-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 22 Apr 2016 7:06:04 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: The Francis Folly...

The chief engineer chief engineer for Lowell, MA, James Bicheno Francis, constructed a five-mile system of canals in 1848. The Merrimack River provided an uninterrupted source of power to a dozen textile mills. Changes in the river level were controlled by a system of gates and locks. He compiled a history of floods and during a major flood in 1785, the river crested above Pawtucket Falls at 13 feet 6 inches. With the city 30 feet lower than the falls, Francis realized that if crest levels repeated; surging water would funnel through the canals, destroying the heart of the city. He proposed building a massive gate to prevent this tragedy by constructing a gate to deflect flood waters. The project included a gate that would drop and close off feeder canals to the Merrimack River andt was similar to gates used to defend castles in medieval Europe.  Contemporaries ridiculed the idea but in April, 1852, the Merrimack was on-the-rise and Francis decided to lower the gate for the first time. On April 22, 1852, the river crested higher than the flood of 1785 and the gate, snug in granite, held fast. The massive gate worked and 24 hours later, a second, 28-foot wall of water, bombarded the gate. Once again it held. For more than 160 years, "Francis's Folly" is still used.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Best Sea Salt..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-best-sea-salt-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-best-sea-salt-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 21 Apr 2016 6:34:28 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Yesterday's column noted that salt farming depends on the weather and for French artisan farmers it’s a time tested labor of love. A combination of abundant sunshine, heating the land and persistent wind creates a surface high tide in Guerande, France. Clockwise circulation from the high enhances an area of marshy meadows, also known as the “Cote Sauvage.” Europeans have harvested salt from the earth and in this location since the ninth century.  Salt farmers, also known as paludiers use the same technique and the same tools to collect this caviar of salt. The collection process begins with a wooden gate that traps the sea water into the marsh. When the correct amount of water flows at the correct rate, a maze of clay walls promotes slow evaporation. After a month, the water seeps into shallow pools and salt appears. Paludiers then collect the gourmet of all salts for use in renowned restaurants worldwide. Seepage leads to shallow pools and the appearance of the salt. Salt farmers use a tool that resembles a swimming pool skimmer to gently drag what looks like a lattice of thin ice into a wicker basket.  After skimming the top, the evaporation process continues, leaving the clay-bottomed basin loaded with coarse grey salt. Natural salt is less acidic and less sharp than industrial salts and with good weather, the paludier’s can harvest of 60 tons of salt.


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Pat Shingleton: "Pass the Salt" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-pass-the-salt-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-pass-the-salt-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 20 Apr 2016 9:49:47 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Salt farming depends on the weather and for French artisan farmers it’s a time tested labor of love. A combination of abundant sunshine, heating the land and persistent wind creates a surface high tide in Guerande, France. Clockwise circulation from the high enhances an area of marshy meadows, also known as the “Cote Sauvage.” Europeans have harvested salt from the earth and in this location since the ninth century.  Salt farmers, also known as paludiers use the same technique and the same tools to collect this caviar of salt. The collection process begins with a wooden gate that traps the sea water into the marsh. When the correct amount of water flows at the correct rate, a maze of clay walls promotes slow evaporation. After a month, the water seeps into shallow pools and salt appears. I will continue to showcase this process in Friday's column.


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Pat Shingleton; "Fog and Disasters..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-fog-and-disasters-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-fog-and-disasters-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 19 Apr 2016 6:47:18 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton;

April is noted for showers and also represents the foggiest month for South Louisiana. On this date in 1952 the tankers Esso Suez and Esso Greensboro collided in dense fog, 200 miles south of Morgan City. The Suez incurred a 20-foot bow gash with both ships bursting into flames. River pilots are trained to navigate during episodes of dense fog not only on the rivers but within simulators that replicate a variety of rough weather scenarios. Included within the scenarios are river levels and snow melt that increases those levels. Fog was the reason for a horrible disaster recognized as the worst aviation accident in history.  Two Boeing 747s collided on the runway in the Canary Islands in 1977, killing 582. On July 25, 1956, the Andrea Doria sank after colliding with the Stockholm in dense fog, 45 miles south of Nantucket Light taking 51 lives.


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Pat Shingleton: "Dams and Concrete" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dams-and-concrete-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dams-and-concrete-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 18 Apr 2016 6:30:52 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On this date, 89 years ago the Great Flood of Louisiana implemented the existing levee system. Imperfect engineering and shoddy construction caused the collapse of dams, such as the Johnstown Flood of 1889.  On May 16, 1874, 138 people died as a result of poor construction and a dam break in Williamsburg, MA.  On March 12, 1928, the St. Francis Dam, in service less than two years, collapsed near Santa Paula, CA, killing 450. February 26, 1972, two coal slag dams along Buffalo Creek in southern West Virginia broke, unloading two miles of backed-up water into a lower dam that exploded, 4,000 homes were washed away with 125 deaths.  June 5, 1976, the 305-foot Teton Dam in Idaho collapsed, released 80 billion gallons of water into adjoining farmland. It takes concrete to build levees and dams. Water is the most widely used material and second on the list is concrete and next to steel, concrete is the strongest material ever manufactured. Concrete cannot be fully recycled however a resurrected solution includes the use of lightning.  Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics in Holzkirchen, Germany revived a method, developed by Russian scientists in the 1940s, called electrodynamic fragmentation.  The problem with recycling concrete is breaking down cement, water, and aggregate or the mixture of stone particles that consist of gravel and limestone grit.  The process includes placing concrete in water then blasting it with a 150-nanosecond bolt of lightning.  The bolt runs through solid material, creating a small explosion then tearing apart and breaking down its components. The fragmentation plant processes one ton of concrete waste per hour with larger volumes expected in the future. 


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Pat Shingleton: "Analysis of the Sinking" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-analysis-of-the-sinking-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-analysis-of-the-sinking-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 14 Apr 2016 5:38:37 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Weatherwise magazine research noted that weather patterns in the winter and early spring of 1911-1912 were to blame for the demise of the RMS Titanic at 11:40 PM. Changes in atmospheric pressure at sea level caused strong north winds that propelled the icebergs farther south than normal, placing them into the Titanic’s course. Iceberg season in the north Atlantic is April through July where more than 80 percent of the total number of icebergs cross south of latitude 48 north. In April, 1912, more than 900 icebergs floated in the North Atlantic.Other ships plying the waters of the North Atlantic, over a two month period, reported an unusually high number of icebergs in the shipping lanes, the same lanes through which the Titanic sailed. Approximately 700 passengers and crew who survived the disaster, testified that sea conditions resembled a placid lake on an unusually calm yet cold night as the role of weather was never considered in the ship's investigation. In 1912, weather technology was in its infancy as scientists began understanding the dynamics behind the weather. Ocean liners did not have radar, sonar or infrared imaging systems and relied on human lookouts, positioned in the crow’s nest, high above the decks. To locate an iceberg at night, lookouts watched for water breaking around their bases. On the fateful night, Second Officer Charles Lightoller noted that the ability to see icebergs decreased with no breakwater around their bases. Lookout officers, Reginald Lee and Frederick Fleet failed to see the iceberg that the Titanic struck until after it tore apart the hull. The Almanac of The Infamous, The Incredible, and Ignored noted that on April 14, 1912, before the Titanic hit an iceberg, Rev. Charles Morgan of Winnipeg fell into a fitful sleep filled with frantic voices and crashing waves. He heard the hymn, “For Those in Peril on the Sea.” Morgan shared his nightmare with his congregation, leading them in singing the hymn. News of the disaster reached Winnipeg the next morning.  On April 14, 1935, William Reeves, a lookout on a steamer from England to Canada, sensed danger, realizing it was the anniversary of the Titanic disaster, 23 years earlier. Sounding the alarm, the ship stopped, surrounded by ice bergs. The name of the ship was the “Titanian.”


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Pat Shingleton: "April Events..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-april-events-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-april-events-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 13 Apr 2016 5:27:17 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Significant occurrences for the month of April take us back to April 11, 1925. Remnants of a limestone ball shattered near Bleckenstad, Sweden and researchers at Lund University found fossilized marine shells and animal particles resembling a trilobite. On April 11, 1983, a 100-pound ice block smashed onto the pavement in Wuxi, China. “The Almanac of the Infamous, the Incredible and the Ignored” reports that ice falls have been noted for hundreds of years.  In the late 1700s, an elephant sized ice block fell in Seringapatam, India and in 1849 a thousand pound ice chunk clunked a farm in Ord, Scotland.  Also in Scotland in 1950, 112 pounds of ice were collected in Dumbarton. In Hartford, Connecticut in 1985 a 1,500 pound sheet of ice, six feet in length, crashed into a fence. On April 13, 1871, renowned French scientist Camille Flammarion was writing "L’Atmosphere" when a strong wind gust blew open the window near his desk. In seconds the whirlwind shuffled his manuscript onto the street.  The manuscript was transported through the rain to Lahure’s printing office in the Rude de Fleurus, a half-mile-away, without a single page destroyed or missing. Ironically, the scientist’s chapter was devoted to the force of wind. Glancing outside, one of Lahure’s publishing assistants noticed the rain and the manuscript strewn on the street. Thinking he had dropped the document he quickly retrieved it. He took the pages into the printing office and told no one for fear of termination; later disclosing the incident.  Flammarion was also a collector of coincidences. 


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Pat Shingleton: "Good Smells, Bad Odors..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-good-smells-bad-odors-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-good-smells-bad-odors-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 12 Apr 2016 11:45:26 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The "frontal-passage" season will stay with us through mid-May then the Bermuda High settles in advancing more Gulf moisture and our traditional steamy weather. The  traditional north to northwest winds that accompany a frontal passage send "whiffs" to us that are either pleasant or offensive. The paper  mills in the Felicianas eject a smell that reminds me of the Heinz plants in Pittsburgh. Tomatoes on your stove that aren't watched become scorched and that smell is similar to the ketchup processing. Flowers Baking Company on Florida Blvd. sends  an aroma that reminds me of Mom's kitchen, freshly baked bread is a nosy treat. A south wind advances the odor from the treatment plant near River Road. In Irwindale, CA.  Huy Fong Foods manufacture Sriracha, a spicy Asian hot sauce. The production of the sauce can release a variety of odors from garlic,  peppers and vinegar. Some residents don't like it, others don't mind it. Environmental scientists have been monitoring the odors at numerous locations . A good wind can move the "smell" or provide the aroma.

 


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Pat Shingleton: "Twister Debris and the Roller..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-twister-debris-and-the-roller-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-twister-debris-and-the-roller-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 11 Apr 2016 5:46:27 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On April 11, 1991 a canceled check was sucked up by tornado in Stockton, Kansas.  It was carried 223 miles to Robert Melcher’s farm near Winnetoon, Nebraska. Years ago, John Knox, an associate professor of geography at the University of Georgia, conducted research on how debris is carried by twisters to better understand the intricacies of this weather phenomenon. Knox and his students categorized items by weight such as a Hackleburg, Alabama high school cheer leading jacket that flew 66 miles to Elkmont, Alabama, during a tornado outbreak. On April 27, 2011, more than 120 tornadoes caused 300 deaths across the South and retrieved items were compared to the direction of the storms.  Regardless of weight, researchers determined that most of the debris fell slightly left of the storm’s track. April continues to be a month of potential damaging storms. Another item, our Mom, Grandma Shirley, will be 95 this Sunday. Until last August, she resided in the house where she was born that rests on an acre of land in Ellwood City, PA.  That property is maintained with a Spring and Fall leaf clean-up and regular cutting through the spring and summer. Most lawns in that section of the country incur damage from the winter weather and her property can be damaged due to access to her back door. Last year, she commented, "Patrick, there's lots of 'ruts' in the yard but we can get out the 'roller' to mend those." Imagine a 3-foot-long cement tube, 2 feet in diameter. Stick a pipe in it, fill it with concrete, attach a metal brace  to the pipe placed in the cement. Finish the construction by attaching a 5 foot 2 by 4 to the brace with a horizontal handle to push and pull the roller. This was constructed in the 1920s and was always propped against our garage and used by our father, grandfather, and us.... to "roll the yard." That roller still works and has caused numerous hernias.

 


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Pat Shingleton: "An Anniversary" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-anniversary-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-anniversary-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 7 Apr 2016 5:53:40 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

After exiting St. Joseph. Missouri in March of 1977 I spent a few days with my parents in Ellwood City, Pennsylvania enroute to Louisiana.  Reymer-Gersin Associates was a television talent agency that forwarded my resume' and "tape" to numerous locations. The opportunities were narrowed to the "Quad-Cities" area near Chicago and Baton Rouge, Louisiana. I flew out of a snowstorm in Kansas City on a Saturday morning and arrived in Baton Rouge, for the first interview, under super blue skies, a temperature of 68 degrees and perfect Spring weather.  After the negotiation process, I accepted a position at WAFB under the supervision of Tommy Gibbens and Carellton Cremeens. On the Saturday that I interviewed, Paul Gates and Chuck "Chuckles" Perrodin were the first employees I met, followed by Grey Hammett. Everything I owned was stuffed into my '76 Camaro as I traveled from Pittsburgh and an overnight in Chattanooga, Tennessee, experiencing some rough weather.  The remaining leg of the journey brought me to Baton Rouge on March 31st with thundershowers.  On April 4th, 39 years ago, I entered Channel 9 hitting "the air" on April 11th. After becoming acclimated to the community and the workplace I was asked by Tommy Baynum to be the"talent" for furniture spots. On Monday mornings I would visit WBRZ Channel 2 taping 15 spots that aired around the state. Each taping was followed by lunch with John Pellerin, Baynum and Bob Headley with occasional visits to News Director John Spain's office. My on-air weather presentation must have been working and in the words of John, "You're either going somewhere else or here with us..." John was correct and I did both, WIIC-WPXI in Pittsburgh and WBRZ in Baton Rouge.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Course of Action..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-course-of-action-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-course-of-action-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 5 Apr 2016 6:01:44 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

From 1943 until late 1944, Augusta National, home of The Masters, was closed for play and transformed back into a farm to help the war effort. German prisoners of war provided the renovation work to erect the famous bridge over Rae’s Creek. Dwight D. Eisenhower , Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe, became a member of Augusta and one remaining landmark bears his name – the Eisenhower Cabin.  The other landmark was a lob lolly pine 210 yards from the tee, on the left side of number 17. Ike hated this tree because his low draw compromised his second shot. In February of 2013, an ice storm  toppled the 125 year old pine and it wasn’t replaced. “Ike” had another tree named after him in 1946 at the Dalmeny Golf Club in Scotland.  Captains from Dalmeny forwarded an acorn from that tree to replant the Eisenhower tree at Augusta that is now three years young. Each side of Magnolia Lane, the entrance to August National has 61 Magnolia Trees that create a “tunnel canopy” to the facility. Eleven years ago, my son Michael and I attended the Saturday and Sunday rounds of The Masters.  As it was our first visit, our friend Paddy Quigley provided needed guidance that included an early placement of our portable chairs on number 18 while walking the course to enjoy play. We enjoyed the playoff rounds between Tiger Woods and Chris Demarco as the navigated between #18 and #10 in a sudden-death playoff. August National embraces tree reforestation, tree mulching programs and a radar system that conserves water and reduces runoff. The parking area is unpaved to accentuate natural absorption and a habitat for ground-nesting birds.  A wildlife habitat is located to the left of number 11. As Mike and I enjoyed our club sandwich we heard the sound of a jet engine. A periodic shower necessitated the initiation of a giant suction device, under each green, that rapidly removes standing water and furthers drying.

 


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