WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2015, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Fri, 27 Mar 2015 06:03:59 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "The 1st Warning-67 Years Ago..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-1st-warning-67-years-ago-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-1st-warning-67-years-ago-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 25 Mar 2015 3:48:56 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On last night's 10 pm weather cast, I was targeting sections of the Midwest for possible hail and damaging winds. In six days, the National Weather Service will initiate Tornado Awareness Month. From April through early October many sections of the United States will experience episodes of tornadoes. Furthering Wednesday's column, Capt. Robert Miller and Maj. Ernest Fawbush believed a tornado was going to hit Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma 67 years ago. This event marked the first time in weather forecasting that a tornado warning was issued and by the time the two officers ended their shift, nothing happened. They believed that their analysis and previous research could have initiated a false alarm for the Air Force base and its occupants. However, between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m., a massive storm erupted with strong thunderstorms, hail and damaging winds. Just as they predicted, multiple  twisters caused $6 million in damage with no injuries. The scientists proved that predictions on when a tornado could hit were possible.They made their prediction based on an archaic radar scope, climatological data, atmospheric analysis and "gut" instincts.  The Air Force gave them the responsibility for severe weather forecasts for all domestic military bases. March 25, 1948, is recognized as the first tornado warning day.


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Pat Shingleton: "What A Prediction!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-what-a-prediction-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-what-a-prediction-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 24 Mar 2015 3:26:49 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

It has been a slow start for Tornado Season. 2015. Similar to land falling, devastating hurricanes, it only takes one.  Years ago, tornadoes were identified and targeted by eyesight, telegraph and later the telephone. Current technology and additional resources provide lead time to protect life and property. On this date, March 25, 1948, tornado forecasting was first discovered. Two Air Force weathermen, Air Capt. Robert Miller and Maj. Ernest Fawbush proved, with a certain degree of accuracy, that a prediction could be issued to determine when a tornado would hit. With reams of atmospheric data and a radarscope designed for a World War II airplane, the two officers issued the first tornado warning. They determined that atmospheric conditions were identical to an earlier tornado that damaged the base and predicted that the next would be stronger than the first. Miller and Fawbush typed out a warning, insisting on evacuations and ordering the tie-down of planes. The results and consequences in tomorrow's column.


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Pat Shingleton: "Sick and Probably Tired" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-sick-and-probably-tired-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-sick-and-probably-tired-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 23 Mar 2015 4:22:57 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The 1976 movie, "Network" had a classic line that included, "I'm not going to take it anymore..." Hurricane Season 2005 was the worst season in recent history for the number and intensity of storms that included Katrina and Rita. Louisiana experienced so much devastation that many folks were tired of the storms, the season and the effects and aftermath. Hurricane Gustav was the worst hurricane to hit Baton Rouge in 2008. I remember it as a timber remover. Not only did we register every name on the Hurricane List in 2005 but we also grabbed an additional five storms from the National Weather Service's "Greek" list to fulfill the naming process. Recent conversations with friends and relatives in Western Pennsylvania found a similar but less destructive experience. In addition to "cabin fever," more snow removal is occurring. Outdoor activities are once again limited until the official Spring thaw and that may occur well into April.


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Pat Shingleton: "Less Inhale, More Exhale" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-less-inhale-more-exhale-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-less-inhale-more-exhale-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 23 Mar 2015 8:37:22 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In 1977 I boarded a plane enroute to Baton Rouge. Snow was piled on the tarmac in Kansas City and when I arrived in Baton Rouge, the sky was blue, the grass was green the azaleas were blooming. I reminisced about that trip on Sunday. More on my arrival in another excerpt but today we're dealing with beauty and the beast. The beauty is the seasonal change and the beast is the coating of green on our vehicles. Not from our recent parade but from Mother Nature. Everything on the cars and even in a finer "particulate" form is ending up in our noses and throats. When the kids were little I always used a "bulb aspirator" to clear their passages. I would tell them, "Let's get that junky-junk out of there!" With a few "applications" all was clear. I guess my obsession with this procedure led to a Christmas gift that included a "bronzed" aspirator mounted on a trophy-like wood block with a plate inscription that reads: "Here's to Junky-Junk Daddy" Christmas 1988, Michael & Katie. Dr.Ryan Boone, Ear, Nose and Throat expert, provides good advice for the next two months. A blast of saline spray in the nostrils, keeping hydrated and possibly some Flonase will help us get through the particulates flying around. Daily vitamins could assist. If not, let me know... I still have a couple of aspirators around here.


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Pat Shingleton: "Battles and the Koran" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-battles-and-the-koran-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-battles-and-the-koran-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 20 Mar 2015 4:40:25 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

A key component of battleground victories constitutes weather conditions. Two key battles occurred in the rise of Islam across the Middle East that were influenced by weather. The "suras" or chapters of the Koran identify the famous Battle of Badr, fought on March 13, 624 C.E. Mohammed and his followers migrated from Mecca to Medina because of persecution to his monotheistic teachings. He gathered 300 warriors to combat 1,000 Quraysh camel mounted warriors at the Oasis of Badr, on the Syrian trade route. According to Muslim sources, a heavy overnight thunderstorm prevented the Quarysh to attempt a nighttime attack. The storms deterred their efforts to advance through thick mud. According to the Koran, angels descended to help Mohammed who tossed dust at his enemies. This monster dust storm forced a Quraysh retreat.


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Pat Shingleton: "Swattin' Blow Flies" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-swattin-blow-flies-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-swattin-blow-flies-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 20 Mar 2015 3:01:16 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Welcome to Springtime! Possibly you've noticed that once we pop on the air conditioners hibernating insects head out of the vents. Yesterday I noticed a huge fly that triggered memories of my Mom. Once the temperatures moved up the "Blow flies" were swarming. Blow and Bottle Flies are common all over the world. These flies derive their name from the bloated condition of rotting animal carcasses that their larvae, known as maggots, infest. Blow flies are the most common flies around dead animals. Meat-processing plants, garbage dumps and slaughterhouses, are highly populated with these flies. I remember Mom's fly swatter that was weighted by a sunflower on one side and of course the swatting mesh on the other. If one of her kids or neighbors would leave a door open form more than eleven seconds, she ordered, "Close the door, I don't want any of those Blow flies on this cobbler I just baked!" She was obsessed with whacking these flies, occasionally in the house, but more so on the front and back porches. It was unfortunate if one of these landed on Grand-pap Price's head, he hated Blow flies for more than one reason.


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Pat Shingleton: "Mom, Snowflakes and Bandaids" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-mom-snowflakes-and-bandaids-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-mom-snowflakes-and-bandaids-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 19 Mar 2015 3:59:02 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Later this afternoon we welcome the start of Spring, also known as the Vernal Equinox.  As we enjoy the blooming Azaleas and patches of daffodils,  folks in the northeast also seek weather relief from the brutal Winter. However, the first day of Spring in the northeast will have another snow event. Growing up in Western Pennsylvania a Spring warm-up was often followed by another blast of cold air, accompanied by a final dusting of snow. During the first snowfalls of the season, Mom would sternly announce, "I don't want 'younze' kids eating that 'thar' snow!"  A few years ago, Science Magazine reported that snowflakes form around bacteria seeds such as Pseudomonas syringae which cause a fatal disease in beans and tomatoes, sparing humans from any ill effects.  Mom knew there were possible dangers in falling snow and rain and often caught us catching a few flakes on our tongue. A few flakes shouldn't cause concern, but buckets of snow may result in a tummy ache! Another "Mom Directive" was taking off a Band-Aid to let a cut "air-out."  In  1962, Dr. George Winter compared open-air abrasions to covered wounds on young pigs. His research determined that skin cells grew twice as fast on covered wounds that were moist rather than scabbed. Thus, the development of the Band-Aid.


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Pat Shingleton: "Bird Brains..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bird-brains-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bird-brains-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 18 Mar 2015 3:40:50 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

I noted yesterday that the buzzards will be returning to Hinckley, Ohio, the swallows are returning to Capistrano and the robins are returning to their northern homes.  I neglected to mention the Purple Martins. Lots of folks have the Martin homes in their backyards, connected to large poles with numerous openings. Maybe they should be called "Purple Martin Motels." It was once believed that homing pigeons relied on the sun's position to decipher Earth's magnetic field for navigation. Over the years, researchers at Oxford University have attached tracking devices to monitor pigeons over extended periods of time.  Their research determined that within ten kilometers of a designated "home," the pigeons followed roads, rivers, railways and hedge lines, even when it wasn't the most direct path home. Scientists believe these birds consistently followed a memorized route. The folks at Benny's Car Wash believe that Baton Rouge pigeons tend to visit "filled" parking lots through the city which greatly assists the traffic at Benny's.


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Pat Shingleton: "16 Years and lots of Columns" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-16-years-and-lots-of-columns-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-16-years-and-lots-of-columns-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 17 Mar 2015 3:48:54 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

With daytime highs in the 70s and overnight lows in the 60s, we'll stay slightly above average for the final days of Winter and the start of Spring. Springtime begins at 5:45 PM Friday whereby the most direct rays of the Sun start their trek north of the Equator. This Friday, bird watchers in South Louisiana will notice the exit of the robins while elsewhere the buzzards arrive in Hinckley, Ohio and the swallows head to Capistrano. Finally, on a personal note, after providing "my take" on "Weather News" in 5,531 columns, a different approach has been recommended; geared more toward weather and less news. My colleague, Josh Eachus now has the assignment. Thanks to you, the readers, and the folks at The Advocate for these last 16 years. "Pat Shingleton's Weather News" will appear be right here on WBRZ.com and possibly other platforms.

 


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Pat Shingleton: "Pig Predictions" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-pig-predictions-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-pig-predictions-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 16 Mar 2015 10:50:35 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

After St. Patrick's Day, it is rare for us to record another freeze. The latest freeze date for Baton Rouge occurred on April 13, 1940. It appears that Spring will come in this Friday, "like a lamb."As noted in a previous column, pig farmer, Gus Wickstrom, for many years, extended a tradition handed-down from his Swedish great-great-grandfather. Gus would predict wether by examining
pig spleens. Depressions and fatty deposits on two-foot-long pig spleens possibly determined the weather. He believed his accuracy within a 200-mile area, from the point where the pig was slaughtered, was 80%. Over the years, Ken Porter, compared spleens with forecasts from Environment Canada's weather reports. Both have gone hog-wild with their predictions.


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Pat Shingleton: "Depleting the Source" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-depleting-the-source-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-depleting-the-source-/ Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 15 Mar 2015 6:18:09 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Earth Gauge posted a report that is of interest to us. Around the world, humans extract one-third of fresh water from underground sources which translates to 36 percent of domestic water and 42 percent of agricultural water. Industrial water draws 27 percent. A we are accustomed to in South Louisiana, "aquifers" haven't accumulated deposits of water for thousands of years. The reason is that because the rate of new soil water accumulation only represents a small fraction of Earth's total ground water storage. These extractions of "fossil water" is occurring quicker than natural restorations. Scientists concur that a principal component of any localized climate is the "recharge" rate that varies with the global distribution of precipitation. Additional research points to less snow accumulation, earlier snow melts, and more winter rainfall events. Droughts cause irrigation systems to transfer from renewable surface waters to non-renewable fossil water. The largest reservoir in the United States, Lake Mead has been depleted for farm use.


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Pat Shingleton: The Ides of March http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-ides-of-march/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-ides-of-march/ Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 14 Mar 2015 9:28:41 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: The Ides of March

The ancient Roman calendar was divided into three lunar sections identified as Kalends, Nones and Ides. The ides would fall on the 15th. Interesting weather occurrences include the 15th of March and a record high and low on the same day and the same location. Astoria, Oregon recorded an overnight low of 28 and later  in the day, the mercury zipped to 61. It was a first for the local weather service office that opened in 1961. On March 15, 1936, an intense stretch of dust storms in southeast Colorado sandblasted paint from vehicles and damaged windshields. As previously noted in another column, the world's five day rainfall record was set in the Indian Ocean at Ciaos, Reunion Island. A tropical cyclone dumped 151.73 inches of rain.


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Pat Shingleton: "Green Time" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-green-time-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-green-time-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 13 Mar 2015 11:12:11 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

No matter what the event or the parade, it always comes down to that final 24 hours before the event. Josh Eachus, Robert Geauthreaux and "yours truly" have predicted "good parade weather" for this morning. We have always showcased this parade as a "rain or shine" event and fortunately this morning, we'll embrace the "shine." Damp weather in Ireland is often referred to as a "soft" day. I launched "The St. Patrick's Day Parade, The Wearin' of the Green" in 1986 but this parade reflects the talents and devotion of our Grand Marshal, Robert "Grey" Hammett. Grey will lead the parade under mostly sunny skies and lots of green. Our route is 2.5 miles in length but the shortest parade is 9.8 miles on Bridge Street in Hot Springs,
Ark.


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Pat Shingleton: "Green Snowflakes" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-green-snowflakes-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-green-snowflakes-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 12 Mar 2015 12:11:30 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

A severe March storm impacted the Baton Rouge area in 1993, and an area from Canada to Central America. It formed in the Gulf of Mexico on March 12th, then skipped across the Eastern Seaboard and into the North Atlantic on March 15th. As noted in a previous column, hurricane force winds were recorded on the Florida Panhandle, Louisiana and Cuba. Fatal tornadoes occurred with record cold in the Deep South. This same system dropped snowflakes on the parade route the night before the "St. Patrick's Day Parade, The Wearin' of the Green." My brother Denis has assisted in every parade, making the trek from Fort Worth to Baton Rouge in icy conditions. We enjoyed icy oysters at Giamanco's on Government Street, remembering earlier Irish snowstorms.


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"A Parade Here, A Parade There..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/a-parade-here-a-parade-there-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/a-parade-here-a-parade-there-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 11 Mar 2015 2:07:23 PM Pat Shingleton

As we await the wrap-up of rain and shower activity it should give us a window of dry weather for parade related preparations. I searched the forecasts in other great parade cities. Incidentally, Destinations Travel Magazine has identified Baton Rouge as one of the best stops for St. Patrick's Day Parades. Other locations include: New York City, Boston, Chicago, Sedona, San Francisco, Louisville,and Sydney, Australia. As we are expecting a return of sunshine on Saturday, other Irish locations will have morning showers in Dublin and 45 degrees. Killarney will dodge showers and 50, Chicago will post 56 degrees.In New York City the thaw continues with 54 degrees while San Francisco will compare to us with 75. Boston expects 45 degrees.


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Pat Shingleton: "Coastal Lows..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-coastal-lows-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-coastal-lows-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 10 Mar 2015 3:25:00 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

We're accustomed to low pressure systems originating on the Texas coast and eventually advancing to the Louisiana coast. These lows include one of many ingredients to send us into a soggy weather pattern that we are currently experiencing. Guiding these lows is the jet stream, that river of air at 25,000 to 35,000 feet. With already saturated ground, and an additional punch of rain, we run the risk of getting three inch amounts that could create flooding. Thus, a Flash Flood Watch is in effect through Thursday, alerting residents on the Amite, Comite, Tickfaw and Tangipahoa River basins. Model runs suggest an end by late Thursday night, giving us a window for float decorating in preparation for Saturday's "Wearin' of the Green" parade.


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Pat Shingleton: "Insurance Woes..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-insurance-woes-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-insurance-woes-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 9 Mar 2015 4:00:30 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

We are accostomed to damage that occurs from flooding and some episodes of busted pipes due to frigid weather. Wintertime damage is limited here but the two main causes in northern extremes are snow and ice. Snow weight can collapse a roof and damage an automobile. Another insurance liability includes ice injuries from slipping and frozen tree branches on a home or a neighbor's home. Following a snow melt, major flooding occurs resulting in problems with septic systems. Homeowner's insurance policies typically covers damage that results directly from winter weather events. Fox News reports that coverage is often denied due to neglect, whereby homeowners, by example, forget to drain pipes resulting in raw sewage backing up into homes.


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Pat Shingleton: I've arrived http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-i-ve-arrived/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-i-ve-arrived/ Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 8 Mar 2015 2:25:41 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: I've arrived

Everything is "greening-up," and blossoming. A quiet moment yesterday brought back memories of March 7, 1977. I boarded a plane in Kansas City, enroute to Baton Rouge for the first time. The runways were plowed earlier that morning, piled to the sides of the tarmac. Arriving in Baton Rouge, I was greeted by the late, Carlton Creemens, blue skies and temperatures in the 60s. During our journey into Baton Rouge, it was pleasing to see "green" along the Interstate, further enhanced around City Park Lake. After visiting with station manager, the late Tommy Gibbens, our next stop was on Highland Road for lunch. Mike Anderson delivered a tray of food that looked like "bait." Carleton had an excellent eye for television talent. Great memories.


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Pat Shingleton: "The 1st Forecast" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-1st-forecast-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-1st-forecast-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 6 Mar 2015 4:02:49 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

As an ambulance driver in World War I, Lewis Richardson performed numerical weather experiments that originally included cataloging sky conditions. As noted in a previous column, his calculations didn't contribute to a useful forecast but were later recognized as the beginning of modern weather predictions. He transferred his notations into a manuscript that was lost and later discovered in a coal bin and published. After his death in 1953 his publication was delivered to the National Weather Service and displayed in their Executive Suite. Richardson predicted that a "large hall-like theater, "filled with human computers would calculate conditions for a particular point on Earth. Those massive parallel computers execute calculations today.

 

 


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Pat Shingleton: "A Numbers Game..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-numbers-game-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-numbers-game-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 5 Mar 2015 4:09:52 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The 24 hour temperature swing from 5:30 Wednesday to Thursday evening was 43 degrees F. The "Top Five" temperature drops include a -49 degree F slide on January 21, 1935. Other spreads include a -47 degree F dip in 1942 and three minus 44 degree dive-bombs on January 12, 1942, January 23, 1942 and January 18, 1996. With our projected low this morning of 27 we could come close to blocking the March 15, 2015 dip of -40 degrees F. This morning's freeze is the 22nd this season with ten mornings in the 20's. Last winter we logged 35 freezes and 21 mornings in the 20s. So is this the last blast of the season? Last year it hit on Mardi Gras day with February 23rd the average day. Our earliest was December 30, 1920 and the latest April 13, 1940.


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