WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2014, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Sun, 21 Dec 2014 12:12:45 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: Chester Did It! http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-chester-did-it-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-chester-did-it-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 19 Dec 2014 1:18:28 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Chester Did It!

Friday's column identified the difficulties of Chester Greenwood and his ears. His doctor determined that he and his ears were allergic to wool and very sensitive to cold weather. With some assistance from his grandmother, Chester solved the problem by looping two pieces of wire with fur sewn to the ends. According to the United States Patent Office, he patented a device that included a steel band, securing the fur pads, and called it Greenwood's Champion Ear Protectors, later forming the Greenwood Ear Protector Factory. We know them as "ear muffs" and Chester's hometown of Farmington, Maine is recognized as the Earmuff Capital of the World. Saturday, December 6th was the 140th year of the Ear Muff Parade.


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Pat Shingleton: An Ear-Lee Warning http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-ear-lee-warning/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-ear-lee-warning/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 18 Dec 2014 1:15:30 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: An Ear-Lee Warning

During episodes of cold weather, Chester Greenwood was cursed with throbbing, aching ears. They would change color when the temperature dipped below freezing. His ears would first turn pale white, then vivid red and finally blue. As noted in previous column, Chester had no trouble doing chores when the weather was above freezing but once the mercury dropped, he dropped inside to get next to the fire. Chester would wear a heavy towel around his head to protect his ears and when ice skating and he tied a scarf around his head. This increased his unbearable itch. Chester was allergic to wool, tolerating the itch and the ache. Tomorrow, we'll share how Chester Greenwood solved the dilemma.


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Pat Shingleton: Lift Off http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lift-off/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lift-off/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 17 Dec 2014 1:49:39 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Lift Off

We continue our column from Wednesday with Wilbur and Orville Wright's designation of Kitty Hawk for their first flight. On September 15, 1903, a Category 2 hurricane hit the Outer Banks with 72 mph winds. When the Wrights arrived at their camp at nearby Kill Devil Hills, ten days later, the shed that housed their glider was lifted from its foundation. By December, they perfected the aerodynamic and stabilization issues previously encountered and for the first time in aviation history, added a motor. Their first attempt at a sustained, powered flight was unsuccessful due to an engine stall, resulting in minor damages. With a frontal passage two days later, their fourth and most famous flight lasted 59 seconds and a distance of 852 feet.


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Pat Shingleton: "Lift Off..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lift-off-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lift-off-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 16 Dec 2014 3:57:18 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In 1899, Orville and Wilbur Wright never heard of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. Requesting wind velocities in the Chicago area from the United States Weather Bureau, Professor Willis Moore forwarded copies of "Monthly Weather Review," containing average wind speeds from across the country. One station was a small community in the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Ironically, Wilbur had a friend and fellow aviation pioneer, Octave Chanute, in North Carolina who calculated gliding experiments. He suggested that the Atlantic coasts of South Carolina and Georgia would provide steady seasonal breezes. Kitty Hawk's Weather Bureau observer, Joseph Dosher convinced the brothers to select Kitty Hawk. Then, a hurricane hit. More in tomorrow's column.


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Pat Shingleton: "Gloves or Mittens" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gloves-or-mittens--67727/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gloves-or-mittens--67727/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 15 Dec 2014 3:56:24 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Gloves were in use for November and a couple of days in December. Mittens are more effective for hand warming. Exposed body parts such as ears, nose, toes and fingers are vulnerable. Hunters, fishing enthusiasts and golfers may experience "chilbains," caused by prolonged exposure to cold, damp weather. As noted in a previous column, symptoms include: redness, burning, itching and chafing of hands and feet. Years ago, the U.S. Army designed a climate-controlled high-tech "uniform." These waterproof suits included tubes, similar to NASA's space suits; circulating cold and warm to accommodate body temperature. "Objective Force Warrior" is a computerized suit, originally designed in the 90s, with a tele-screen helmet and purifying system.


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Pat Shingleton: Tee-Pee Talk Two http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-tee-pee-talk-two/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-tee-pee-talk-two/ Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 14 Dec 2014 4:37:13 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Tee-Pee Talk Two

Saturday's column described "winter count," where Native Americans chronicled the winter season. During harsh winters, tribes hibernated and sketched images of battles, deaths of leaders and extreme climate conditions. In 1686, John K. Bear noted "ice all over the land." In 1711 Batiste Good journaled, "four lodges drowned winter" and Ben Kindle reported in 1773, "Even the dogs got snow blindness." The Native American, American Horse, catalogued events from 1789 to 1791, including, "They could not hunt on account of the deep snow" and floods in 1825 to 1826 found authors reporting, "Missouri floods, kills 30 lodges." These entries suggest that Native American winter counts contain valuable climate records


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Pat Shingleton: "Getting Plowed" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-getting-plowed-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-getting-plowed-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 12 Dec 2014 8:37:17 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In our younger years, a heavy snowfall sent us outdoors. Neighborhood pine trees offered a traditional winter prank. I would encourage my brother Kevin to stand under the snow laden branches. I would then vigorously shake the branches, unloading 20 pounds on his head. Another "big snow" treat was "laying-down" on the bank of our front lawn. One of our "scouts" would watch for the snowplow. Within minutes a pile of snow was on top of us. A similar incident occurred last November in New York's Hudson Valley. Two boys were accidentally covered with snow and trapped after a snowplow was clearing a parking lot. The boys were buried for hours and police officers and neighbors saved the youths by digging through a seven foot mound of snow.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Ship of Trees" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-ship-of-trees-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-ship-of-trees-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 11 Dec 2014 3:57:32 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The Rouse Simmons sank during a winter gale on November 23, 1912. For 30 years the schooner brought Christmas trees from Michigan and Wisconsin to Chicago. As noted in a previous column, it would arrive at Chicago's docks in early December, decorated with Christmas lights. The public boarded the ship, purchasing balsam, pine trees, garland and wreaths and was dubbed, the "Christmas Tree Ship." The ship's captain, Herman Schuenemann, gave trees to poorer residents and was named, Captain Santa. Following the sinking of Rouse Simmons and its cargo of 5,000 trees, the tradition continues. Trees grown in Michigan are purchased by the Christmas Ship Committee of Chicago. In December they navigate Lake Michigan, escorted by the U.S. Coast Guard.


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Pat Shingleton: "December Snow..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-december-snow-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-december-snow-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 10 Dec 2014 3:56:03 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

A look-back" to this date in 2008 found a developing low along the Texas coast, tracking northeast, edging closer to south Louisiana. During the evening hours, the National Weather Service predicted a possible "wintry mix" in our area at daybreak. The Channel 2 weather team was "on-the-fence" as to whether it would be a sleet or snow event. Unusually, I awoke that morning at 5:00 AM, as snow fell at a rapid rate. I sped to the station where three inches had accumulated by 9:00 AM. Josh Eachus finalized his snow research yesterday reporting that if you are looking for a guaranteed white Christmas, head to Michigan, Minnesota or Washington state. Christmas Eve and Day, 2004 was our last "White Christmas" episode with a dusting of snow.


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Pat Shingleton: 'A Shell Game...' http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-shell-game-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-shell-game-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 9 Dec 2014 3:56:36 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: 'A Shell Game...'

Thousands of years ago, Incans discarded clam shells that today are a key ingredient to climatology. Weatherwise Magazine reports that shell of every clam shell provides evidence of water temperature over a two-to-three-year lifespan. The data of past water temperature is challenging a belief that El Ninos began about 8,000 years ago and were weaker compared to today. Archaeological piles of shells in Peru's Ica valley have provided evidence of water temperatures for intervals spanning 100 to 1,000 years over the past 10,000 years. These discoveries are compared to tree ring analysis. It appears that the clam shell discoveries suggest that the current understanding of the El Nino system is incomplete. El Nino experts have clammed up.


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Pat Shingleton: 'Nicholas to Claus' http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-nicholas-to-claus--67541/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-nicholas-to-claus--67541/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 9 Dec 2014 1:17:02 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: 'Nicholas to Claus'

Last Saturday was the Feast of St. Nicholas and has been celebrated since the fifth century. As noted in a previous column, Nicholas was the Bishop of Myra which is modern-day Turkey. The Little Blue Book-Advent and Christmas Seasons mentions that Nicholas anonymously aided the needy by tossing small bags of gold in their windows. Legend notes that the bags landed in stockings, drying near the fireplace. His generosity encouraged others to give gifts during Candlemas. English reformers replaced Nicholas with Father Christmas, believing his relationship was too close to the Catholic Church. Father Christmast changed to Santa Claus and Clement Moore gave him a sleigh, reindeer, a pipe, a bag and a chimney in "The Night Before Christmas."


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Pat Shingleton: In Flight Lightning http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-in-flight-lightning/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-in-flight-lightning/ Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 7 Dec 2014 2:33:57 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: In Flight Lightning

When lightning strikes planes, the charges glide from nose to tail or from wing tip to wing tip before discharging. Today, airliners have on-board radar to track storms and wind shear. These technological advances prevent lightning from disrupting an aircraft. As noted in a previous column, over Elkton, Maryland, on December 8, 1963, Pan Am Flight 214 was in final approach to Philadelphia International Airport at 8:51 P.M. Vectoring through thunderstorms, mayday messages were received in the control tower at 8:59 P.M. Moments later the National Airlines pilot reported the plane in flames. Witnesses reported a strong lightning flash, followed by a glowing ball at the end of the flash that caused the unusual accident killing 81 passengers.


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Pat Shingleton: Tree Up, Tree Down http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-tree-up-tree-down/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-tree-up-tree-down/ Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 6 Dec 2014 2:57:54 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Tree Up, Tree Down

Our unseasonably warm weather won't deter families from heading to the country today to cut a tree. Limited space finds some folks hanging a Christmas tree upside down which could compromise needed water. This practice originated in the 700's. The Little Blue Book for Advent and the Christmas Season notes that St. Boniface, an eighth century English monk, started this tradition as he furthered Christianity to Germany and France. Faced with deep-rooted idolatry, Boniface discovered residents worshipping a giant oak tree and chopped it down. In its place a tiny evergreen sprouted. He used its triangular shape to explain the Holy Trinity and the fir tree was then known as the Trinity Tree. Hung upside down, it then became a Christmas symbol.


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Pat Shingleton: "Wardrobe Malfunction..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wardrobe-malfunction-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wardrobe-malfunction-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 4 Dec 2014 3:10:40 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The continual warm weather is keeping us in shirts and possibly shorts. It was a limited wardrobe for our grandfather, Bert Price. He wore the same clothing everyday, no matter what the weather. His wardrobe consisted of cotton long johns, heavy socks, flannel shirt, a railroad hat, bib overalls or pants with suspenders and work gloves. He kept the sleeves on his long-sleeve shirt in place with elastic garters. This was his uniform when he was a switchman on the railroad and his uniform for his remaining years. During the winter months the only modification was a coat that was called a mackinaw. During the four seasons, I never saw him sweating profusely or shivering and the only wardrobe change was his "Sunday-Go-To-Meeting" suit and tie.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Big One..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-big-one-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-big-one-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 3 Dec 2014 3:54:05 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The needed rain in California won't put a dent in their drought. It is wet-weather season there and no season compares to what the state experienced 153 years ago. From December, 1861 to January, 1862, a 30 day event translated to a 30,000 year flood event. Rain was reported in the state on 28 out of 39 days. San Francisco logged 34 inches of rain, Sacramento picked up 37 and Nevada City, in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, recorded snow depths that were equivalent to 115 inches of rain. During that time period, Los Angeles reported 35 inches of rain. Weatherwise Magazine reports that the reason for the deluge was a bulge in the jet stream and a stalled trough of low pressure. More rain is needed to break the existing drought in California.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Eye in the Sky" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-eye-in-the-sky-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-eye-in-the-sky-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 2 Dec 2014 3:57:30 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

During our weather broadcasts we reference a variety of astronomical events. For those occasions we rely on the Skywatcher's Almanac and the Astronomical Data Service published by Roger Mansfield. I received an electronic message from Roger this week noting my appreciation to him for his work in astronomy and astrodynamics. Roger noted that he began his space career in 1967 as a weather satellite orbital analyst with the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program. From their command and control center at Offutt Air Force base in Nebraska, Roger was instrumental in the operational capabilities of Geostationary and Polar-Orbiting weather satellites. Thanks to Roger, these satellites provide "views" that we display on our weather broadcasts.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Big Meltdown" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-big-meltdown-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-big-meltdown-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 1 Dec 2014 4:04:55 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The New York Times reports that large portions of the West Antarctica Ice Sheet is collapsing at an irreversible trend. Scientists report that climate change is once again the culprit. Two studies found that naturally occurring warm water is being advanced upward toward the ice sheet as stronger winds blow into the Antarctica region. This combination is creating a potentially catastrophic instability. Scientists predict this scenario could result into a meltdown of the sheet into the Southern Ocean in the next 200 to 900 years. Climate change may have increased the intensification of winds around the Antarctic region. Many researchers believe this trend is unalterable and increases in global sea levels of up to 16 feet are expected.


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Pat Shingleton: (Eerie) Canal http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-eerie-canal/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-eerie-canal/ Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 30 Nov 2014 2:35:57 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: (Eerie) Canal

December, 2014 is coming in like a "lamb." Years ago, snow covered Baton Rouge before our Coats for Kids distribution. Historical events for the end of November and the first days of December include extremely cold weather on November 29, 1831. This event "iced-over" the Northeast, closing New York's Erie Canal through December. On December 1, 1969, an island was submerged from a stalled low pressure system in the Hawaiian Islands near the French Frigate Shoals. Three feet of water covered the 300 foot-wide Tern Island causing the evacuation of the Coast Guard station. As noted previously, in Claiborne Parish on December 3, 1962, tennis ball sized hail covered the ground and chipped sidewalks in Goodwin as 40 mph winds tore off roofs.


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Pat Shingleton:Burn the Log, Prevent Lightning http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-burn-the-log-prevent-lightning/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-burn-the-log-prevent-lightning/ Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 29 Nov 2014 2:57:44 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:Burn the Log, Prevent Lightning

It's been two weeks since we experienced a thunderstorm event. As we wrap-up our Thanksgiving weekend, we advance to Advent, and preparations for Christmas. The "Yule Log" wasn't just for Christmas. In Germany, the burning of a large block of oak, called a Yule Log, is a time-honored tradition. This tradition predates Christianity and may have some connection with the ancient Aryan creed. This creed associated the oak tree with the god of thunder. In Germany, the custom suggests withdrawing the Yule log from the fire as soon as it is charred. It was then kept in the house throughout the year and repositioned on the fire during thunderstorms. Many believed that bolts of lightning would never strike a house where a Yule Log was smoldering.


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Pat Shingleton: Thanksgiving Hurricane http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-thanksgiving-hurricane/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-thanksgiving-hurricane/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 28 Nov 2014 11:29:17 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Thanksgiving Hurricane

Hurricane Season 2014 ends tomorrow with eight named storms, six hurricanes and two major hurricanes. The Saturday evening weather after Thanksgiving, 1898 in New England was rapidly deteriorating. In 90-mile-per-hour winds and 30-foot-seas, The Portland's captain was known as a "storm racer" and would regularly make runs from Boston to Portland, Maine. The steamship was designed for flat coastal bays and went down at 9:30 pm; verified by pocket watches that came ashore. It was a victim of "The 1898 Hurricane" that claimed 190 lives and was one of the worst in New England history. One hundred and fifty ships went down or were scuttled on that fateful evening. In August, 2002 the wreckage of the Portland was located.


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