WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Weather - Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2014, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Sat, 1 Nov 2014 04:11:20 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Rubbed the Wrong Way" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rubbed-the-wrong-way-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rubbed-the-wrong-way-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 31 Oct 2014 4:01:53 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Some believe weather changes create additional cold and allergy symptoms. Our grandfather professed this and on his nightstand would place a bowl of apples, onions, and garlic, laced with whiskey, when he experienced chest congestion. As noted in a previous column, mom would send us to school with Vick's Vapor Rub piled on our chest and throat that prevented me from getting a "date." Another application was a "mustard plaster." This combination included: flour, baking soda, dried mustard mixed with shortening, butter, lard or Oleo. Mixed with hot water, this concoction is packed into muslin or flannelette then applied to one's chest and layered with Vaseline. Two weeks ago, I tried this application and was escorted from the bedroom.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Corny Halloween Prank" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-corny-halloween-prank-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-corny-halloween-prank-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 30 Oct 2014 4:01:24 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

More than 50 years ago, cold, rain or snow never cancelled our Halloween. As noted in previous columns, gardens in the neighborhood found lingering corn stalks with an ear or two. The gravel-like kernels were twisted from the cob and separated into paper bags. When the shucking ended a prank was underway-for some. Me and my brothers Denis and Kevin did not participate in these activities. The Halloweener's that did included: the Sudano boys, Dangerous Doug Kelly, Pumpkin Head Hulick, Dumps Wiley, Skunk Tritt and our brother, Mike. In addition to completing our homework at the kitchen table, we assisted Mom with treat distribution that included cupcakes and popcorn balls. The rattle of the hard corn on the windows sounded like a machine gun.


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Pat Shingleton: "Super Sandy and The Perfect Storm" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-super-sandy-and-the-perfect-storm-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-super-sandy-and-the-perfect-storm-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 29 Oct 2014 3:55:07 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On this date in 2012, New Jersey residents were experiencing the devastation of Superstorm Sandy. In 1991, another storm, referred to as the Halloween Storm, lashed the North Carolina coast for five days. Hurricane-force winds pounded New England and New Jersey causing the highest tides on the Eastern Seaboard since the Great Atlantic Hurricane of '44. As noted in a previous column, it was the basis for the novel and the movie, "The Perfect Storm," and the sinking of the Andrea Gail. It was called "perfect" because of the events that created the storm. An extra-tropical cyclone developed along a cold front. Upper air support and Hurricane Grace, making a hairpin turn to the east, led to treacherous sea conditions over the western Atlantic.


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Pat Shingleton: "No Water... No Lawns..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-no-water-no-lawns-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-no-water-no-lawns-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 28 Oct 2014 3:52:38 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

California's drought is not a temporary obstacle but a long term consequence. The region has endured decades-long periods of drought, something the state is likely to endure in years to come. Researchers have constructed simulations to determine how California can handle an extensive 70-year-drought. Experts expect the state can continue to thrive with water conservation; a necessity rather than an option. Past procedures will be adjusted. First on the list are lawns. Typical green yards will be one of the first casualties of a prolonged drought as incentives to property owners include switching to desert-friendly landscaping, requiring very little water. Groundwater and waste water will be recycled rather than dumping it into the Pacific.


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Pat Shingleton: "From '26 to '15?" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-from-26-to-15-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-from-26-to-15-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 27 Oct 2014 4:01:33 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Tropical Storm Hanna is hugging the Nicaraguan/Honduras border as the eighth storm of the season. Meanwhile, Florida has gone 3,270 days without a hurricane. The last time this streak occurred was between 1980 and1984. The strongest storm on record that hit Miami was "The 1926 Hurricane." Experts believe that if a similar storm would hit Miami it would result in $180 billion in damage. The Florida Division of Emergency Management is preparing for a major hurricane to hit this area due to complacency. The number of people living near Florida's seashore has increased by 1.1 million since 1990 to 4.8 million. Most of the increase is attributed to seaside growth over the last four decades. When storms don't strike, many forget the consequences.


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Pat Shingleton: Are you Familiar with These? http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-are-you-familiar-with-these-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-are-you-familiar-with-these-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 26 Oct 2014 2:01:32 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Are you Familiar with These?

Saturday's column noted the origin of the term "threshold." The origin of this food stuff recognizes a slab of bacon as a sign of a wealthy man who "could really bring home the bacon." As noted in a previous column, sharing the bacon led to guests - "chewing the fat." The wealthy had plates of pewter while the poor used rarely washed wooden bowls called "trenchers." Bacteria and worms got into the wood causing cases of "trench mouth". In England, limited space meant re-using graves for burials. Some coffins displayed scratch marks for those buried alive. A string tied on the wrist of a dead person was attached to a bell above ground. Someone on the "graveyard shift" would identify a "dead ringer" or someone "saved by the bell."


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Pat Shingleton: Dirty Babies, Wet Floors http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dirty-babies-wet-floors/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dirty-babies-wet-floors/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 25 Oct 2014 3:11:17 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Dirty Babies, Wet Floors

Our daily bath or shower is routine but not the case years ago when the "man of the house" enjoyed the privilege of clean water for his bath. As noted in a previous column, Dad's "scrub-up" was followed by the other sons, then the women and finally the babies. The dirty water posed a threat of losing a family member, leading to the saying: "Don't throw the baby out with the bath water." "Pillars of the Earth" is a subtle reminder that only the wealthy had slate floors and during wet weather a layer of thresh was placed on the slippery surface for better footing. During the winter months, piles of thresh would cover the doorway and once opened, thresh would spill onto the entryway, creating the word "threshold."


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Pat Shingleton: "Cider, With a Punch!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-cider-with-a-punch-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-cider-with-a-punch-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 24 Oct 2014 10:33:00 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

A hoedown is a dance or traditional fiddle tunes. Octobers in high school included the Varsity "R" Hoedown, a fundraiser for the athletic teams that included food, music and cider drinking competitions. One contestant spilled a mug of cider. As my brother Mike cleaned the mess, Bobo Tincani stepped into the cider puddle. Mike told him to move and Bobo made the mistake of saying, "Make me!" With Jim Richards as Mike's top second, Bobo was directed to Locust Grove School to settle the disagreement. On a clear, chilly, October evening Mike, Jim, Bobo and his entourage poured out of their cars. Before Bobo could get his coat off, Mike landed two rights and a left, knocked him out and settled the cider dispute.

 


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Pat Shingleton: Raining, On a Scale of 1 to 10 http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-raining-on-a-scale-of-1-to-10/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-raining-on-a-scale-of-1-to-10/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 23 Oct 2014 11:29:28 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Raining, On a Scale of 1 to 10

On October 23, 1947, a cafe in Marksville was suddenly filled with news that fish were falling from the sky. As noted in an archived column, a biologist for the Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries provided this account: "In an 80,000 square foot area, thousands of freshwater fish, native to local waters, were landing on Main and Monroe streets. The fish were falling in intervals, landing on roofs and in back yards." Marksville's Bank Director, J.M. Barnham discovered hundreds in his yard while his cashier, J.E. Gremillion was clunked on the head with a "hickory shad." Researchers have reviewed the data from this day that recorded mild weather, light breezes but remain stumped as to the cause of the Great Fish Fall in Marksville.


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Pat Shingleton: A Hail of A Blast http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-hail-of-a-blast/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-hail-of-a-blast/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 22 Oct 2014 10:26:03 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: A Hail of A Blast

In 1907 the Italian Royal Academy of Sciences noted that tests of anti-hail cannons weren't effective and urged the government to cease encouraging expensive and useless work. By the early twentieth century, anti-hail cannons disappeared. Replacing them were rockets that would explode 800 grams of dynamite, above the ground, to prevent hail formation. The explosions caused cold core eddies that develop hail to break up. The rockets were in conflict with safety measures designed by civil aviation. In 1972, the French company, Corballan, marketed a new version of the hail cannon and remains the largest manufacturer. The new cannons substitute acetylene for black powder, automatically load and reload and are fired from remote locations.


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A Blast from the Past http://www.wbrz.com/news/a-blast-from-the-past/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/a-blast-from-the-past/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 21 Oct 2014 2:40:07 PM Pat Shingleton A Blast from the Past

Luigi Bombicci, a mineralogist from Bologna, Italy, believed that hail could be prevented. In 1880, his theory of "spherohedron" described the hailstone's process of crystallization and preventing hail development with sound. In 1896, Albert Steiger, Mayor of Windisch-Feistritz, Austria, made the first attempt to defeat hail with the force of sound and did so by using a locomotive smokestack. He packed it with black powder and directed the stack into a thunderstorm. Mayor Steiger professed that hail no longer would fall on his fields and cannons were accepted. Another glance at anti-hail cannon technology in tomorrow's column.


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Pat Shingleton: "Look Out Below!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-look-out-below-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-look-out-below-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 20 Oct 2014 4:00:06 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

It's not unusual for those that reside in the northern extremes and the northeast to experience snowfall at this time of the year. The "changing leaves" were somewhat deterred this year as maples and cottonwoods still offer beautiful displays. Also at this time of the year, forecasts may include a "snow loading alert." This is especially pertinent to pedestrians. Many "walkers" are put under an alert for not only slippery sidewalks but travel under trees. Trees that hold their leaves into November become a "catch-all" for additional atmospheric conditions. A rare, four-inch snowstorm collects on leaves, increasing the branch weight. Adding heavy, wet snow to tree branches can snap power lines, causing injury below, thus the need for a "snow loading alert."


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Pat Shingleton: Why Indian Summer? http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-why-indian-summer-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-why-indian-summer-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 19 Oct 2014 2:34:09 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Why Indian Summer?

In other sections of the United States it is not unusual for a winter weather alert to be issued at this time of the year and many locations are also awaiting their first frost. An extended period of dry, warm days, following a frost,` is common and as noted in a previous column, this describes Indian summer. In Europe, this same weather pattern is called Old Wives' summer, Halcyion days, St. Martin's summer, St. Luke's summer and All-Halloween summer. There are years when Indian Summer doesn't occur while numerous episodes have been reported in other years. My weather diary included an e-mail received, from Marsha Reichle, where she noted that the reason it is called Indian Summer is because it is traditionally followed by Apache fog.


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Pat Shingleton: Hurricanes and Earthquakes http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hurricanes-and-earthquakes/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hurricanes-and-earthquakes/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 18 Oct 2014 2:45:13 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Hurricanes and Earthquakes

Weather anniversaries for October 19 include Hurricane Wilma, blasting the Yucatan with 175 mile-per-hour winds nine years ago. Katrina, Rita, Wilma were the five most intense Atlantic hurricanes, rewriting the record book in other categories. Wilma's eye wall was two nautical miles wide, the smallest on record. Louisiana has also experienced episodes of earthquakes. On this date in 1930 one rattled Napoleonville with effects reported in Allemands, Donaldsonville, Franklin, Morgan City and White Castle. Residents reported overturned objects, shaken trees and cracked plaster. Other area quakes include a magnitude 3.8 reading near Greenville, MS on June 4, 1967. On November 19, 1958, one shook houses and rattled windows in Baton Rouge.


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Pat Shingleton: "Dalibard Was the First..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dalibard-was-the-first-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dalibard-was-the-first-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 17 Oct 2014 4:00:09 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Previous columns have noted Ben Franklin's expertise as an inventor, including his lightning experiments. Franklin was inspired by other inventors, especially French academic, Thomas Dalibard who actually performed the first lightning experiment. Franklin wanted to duplicate Dalibard's experiment and did so from Philadelphia's Christ Church on October 19, 1752. According to his diary, Franklin made a cross of two light sticks, reaching the four corners of a handkerchief. Attached to the top of the stick was a sharp pointed wire, to the end of the twine, silk ribbon and a key. The exact location of Franklin's experiment places it possibly in mid-June in a now vacant lot near the interesection of 18th and Spring streets in Philadelphia.


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pat Shingleton: "A Wash Out..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-wash-out-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-wash-out-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 16 Oct 2014 3:58:28 PM Pat Shingleton pat Shingleton:

King John "Lackland," King Henry's II's favorite son, got his nickname because his father had no land to give him. As noted in a previous column, John, the younger brother of King Richard the Lionhearted, tried to overthrow his brother. Returning from the Crusades in 1194, he forgave his brother but John was condemned by barons because of taxes. In 1215, they presented a resolution, constructing the Magna Carta which he signed but didn't embrace. Retreating from an invasion by Prince Louis of France, he and his entourage crossed the Wash, located in East Anglia. This treacherous mud flat incurred an unusually high tide; washing away his treasures including the crown of jewels. Because of the flood, King John died of dysentery in October 2016.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Direct Hit..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-direct-hit-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-direct-hit-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 15 Oct 2014 3:57:12 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On October 15, 1907, Nicaraguan rebel forces, under the leadership of Gen. Pablo Castilliano, were attempting to overthrow the government. As noted in a previous column, with money, weapons and expertise, government forces were repeatedly beaten by the rebels and on the verge of surrendering. Camped along a ridge overlooking their enemy, the rebels prepared for a final daybreak assault. Castilliano went to his tent to record the day's events when suddenly the camp was aglow. A fireball made a direct hit on Castilliano's tent, leaving a hole ten feet deep and fifteen feet wide with bits of the meteorite scattered throughout the hole. The rebels, believing the meteorite was a sign of displeasure from heaven, retreated, stopping the rebellion.


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Pat Shingleton: "Assisting the Enemy with a Forecast." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-assisting-the-enemy-with-a-forecast-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-assisting-the-enemy-with-a-forecast-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 14 Oct 2014 3:56:49 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

By October 27th, the World Series will include either the Giants, Cardinals, Orioles or Royals. After Pearl Harbor in 1941, the Office of Censorship advised radio stations to omit mentions of weather. It was a voluntary "code" as station managers feared compromising their licenses. Newspapers could only publish the previous day's highs and lows for no more than 20 cities. Descriptions of weather
from the "Lower 48" could have assisted German ships and submarines in the Atlantic. The daily mention of field conditions for a baseball game was acceptable but constraints were placed on "rained-out" games. Announcers were instructed to broadcast "a cancelled event due to weather," "wet grounds" or "muddy fields." No playing ball with the enemy.


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Pat Shingleton: "Putting On A Front..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-putting-on-a-front-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-putting-on-a-front-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 13 Oct 2014 3:48:19 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

After a return to August-like weather a well organized cold front blasted through our state on Monday. Wind damage and investigated reports of tornadoes will be validated today. The destructive nature of this front is also providing a few benefits this week. We're fortunately sliding out of the upper and mid 80s to temperatures in the mid 70s through Wednesday. This front will also shift our winds from the north and provide a nice dry-out through the forecast period. Another benefit of this weather episode is the upper level trough that is advancing well ahead of the cold front. This mechanism will assist in pulling Hurricane Gonzolo away from the eastern seaboard of the United States, bumping it into the Atlantic. Enjoy a taste of Autumn.


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Pat Shingleton: The miracle http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-miracle/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-miracle/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 12 Oct 2014 1:40:03 PM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III Pat Shingleton: The miracle

On October 13, 1917, 70,000 people gathered at Fatima, Portugal, to witness a miracle. They testified that the sun became detached from the sky, rolling right and left as if it were falling upon the earth. Lucia Santos and her two cousins Francisco and Jacinta Marto testified that five months earlier the Virgin Mary appeared to the three young children; the only ones to witness her that day. During this solar phenomena Father Ignatius Pereira, then, 9 years-of-age, reported that objects around them reflected colors of the rainbow. Ten minutes later, the sun returned to its original location, without the same brilliance. Monsignor Quareman also reported that white flower petals appeared to be falling and disappearing before landing.


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