WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2015, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Tue, 1 Sep 2015 04:09:20 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Storm Coverage..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-storm-coverage-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-storm-coverage-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 28 Aug 2015 6:39:09 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Here's another excerpt from our on and off-air coverage of "The Storm." who's name was translated to "Cleansing." "After Katrina made landfall we shifted our coverage to the parishes north of Lake Pontchartrain.  Before the Noon hour on that day, I returned home to start a generator. Wind speeds were running between 40 and 50 miles per hour as I maneuvered around downed power lines, poles and debris. Expecting a short visit, I fired-up the generator, plugged in the fans and a refrigerator and was returning to the station when the accident occurred.  A side door to our home was open as was another door to the generator. Hugging my wife and daughter goodbye, the open doors created a vacuum or draft that violently blew the side door shut with my left hand lodged in the door jam. The bang of the door was followed by a trio of screams. Needing to get back on the air, we noticed it was quite a gash so I smattered the wound with Crazy Glue, wrapped it and hit-the-road.  Later that day, our neighbor, Dr. Frank Breaux, called the station seeking advice on conflicting reports from New Orleans. With assistance from our newsroom we were able to validate the reports. During the conversation I shared with him my smashed finger. His home was a short distance from ours and on my second trip home I swung by his house and when he saw the cut, he immediately told me to follow him for  treatment.  Frank is the Chief of Staff at the hospital and proceeded to clean and stitch my fourth finger.  What kept most of "his" staff in stitches was that yours truly had his finger repaired with both feet in the stirrups? I was told it was standard procedure."


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Pat Shingleton: "The Look-Back" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-look-back-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-look-back-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 27 Aug 2015 6:40:32 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

I've extracted previous columns to incoporate events that occurred ten years ago.  These excerpts were published in The Advocate's, "Pat's Weather News."  "Experts at the Hurricane Center in Miami will target warm-water eddies on Katrina's approach Monday. These swirling pockets of water will strengthen the storm as it moves through super-hot water. The nightmare scenario of a hurricane is the storm surge, a giant bulge of water that is pushed toward land by the hurricane's swirling wind. As it comes ashore, the mound of water grows and floods the coastline. Over the years, forecasters have improved their capabilities at plotting the path of a storm but predicting its strength, just prior to landfall, is always a surprise.  Most of the category four storms that pack winds of 131 to 155 mph, and all category five storms traditionally go through cycles of rapid intensification.  Researchers at the Hurricane Research Lab at LSU believe the on-shore water depth could be a piece of the forecasting puzzle."  "Many computer models don't distinguish the cause and mystery of a hurricane's intensification. Hurricane Katrina's engine is being fueled by a high-octane source - the hot waters of the Gulf of Mexico. The warmer the Gulf, the stronger Katrina gets. Over the weekend it has been solidifying its path by diverting dry air and seeking out moist pockets of the atmosphere. Researchers at the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration are relying on the Gulf Loop Current, a main ingredient in storm strength and formation.  The current delivers hot water from the Caribbean into the Gulf of Mexico.  As the current swerves around it emits super-warm whirlpools called "eddies."  As Katrina continues to pass over these warm eddies, the storm intensifies. In addition to computer models, storm predictors will utilize information around the storm including moisture fields and vertical wind sheer. All of this data is extrapolated to determine a truer path, the intensity of Katrina and projected damage before landfall."  "After 48 hours of coverage of this devastating, catastrophic and unfortunate storm, some comments.  In every hurricane conference that I have attended, the New Orleans scenario has been displayed. The worst-case scenario Monday morning played-out to the almost exact expectations of the Hurricane Center in Miami.  Numerous storms have skirted and hit New Orleans.  They include the October 10, 1837 Hurricane, the September 22, 1909 Hurricane, the October 2, 1915 Hurricane and the September 6, 1948 Hurricane.  The named storms include Hilda in October of 1964, Betsy on September 12, 1965, Fern in September of 1971, Bob on July 12, 1979, Elena on September 2, 1965, Juan on October 29, 1985 and Florence on September 9,1988. Thanks to all who responded to our unprecedented coverage of Hurricane Katrina; in conjunction with WGNO in New Orleans and my friend Bruce Katz it was a unique perspective for New Orleaneans in Baton Rouge that were weathering the storm."  "Dry air and hurricanes don't mix.  Hot water, circulation and winds do.  The Associate Press filed an article Tuesday concerning an injection of dry air  that could have weakened this storm.  We too, reported on WBRZ, Channel 2, prior to landfall as Katrina held its Category 5 status.  The shallow northern Gulf shelf and a blast of Midwestern dry air bopped it down to a Category 4, slid the storm more east and avoided the direct hit. As the center of circulation crossed St. Bernard and Plaquemine Parishes and the eastern section of Lake Pontchartrain, the ingredients of three massive water components came together.  Surprisingly, Katrina wasn't as strong as many hurricanes that hit the United States but the destruction was so massive because of its massive size." In 30 years of forecasting the weather and every tropical storm and hurricane in that time period this could become the worst tropical disaster ever.  Each and every day, the story changes and will continue to be the story for months to come. The damage toll from Katrina will top every previous hurricane and will probably be the costliest storm in our history. Time magazine reports that basic home insurance wind damage from a hurricane provides a deductible between 1% and 5% of your home's value. In coastal areas prone to high wind exposure it will go even higher. Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas, North and South Carolina have windstorm pools to fund policies at high risk for severe wind and hail.  Standard home insurance policies don't cover flooding but the federal; government does through the National Flood Insurance Program.  Twenty-five percent of flooding claims are in areas not designated at high risk for floods. Katrina will not only be the largest storm catastrophe but the nation's worst."


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Pat Shingleton: "Bird Alerts..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bird-alerts-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bird-alerts-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 26 Aug 2015 7:07:55 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

When my daughter, Katie, was just a baby girl, we would visit University Lakes for a "duck feeding." We'd go through a loaf or two of stale bread during our visits. Out trips down River Road also brought mixed reviews from those in the car when I would "Mooooo" at the cows, grazing on the levee.  Katie asked, "Where do the birds go when they die?" It was an interesting question whereby I asked friends that were avid hunters if they had every experienced areas of bird cemeteries... The International Business Times reports that last April, a flock of songbirds flew 1,500 miles to their nesting grounds in the Appalachians.  The tagged birds then added another 932 miles to their journey due to an approaching storm. The golden-winged warblers apparently detected tornado producing storms and diverted their flight. Researchers report that it's the first documented event that birds departed their nesting grounds due to an approaching storm. Swooping birds often experience rumbling, created by tornadoes. Noise from tornadoes can travel thousands of miles and is in the "infrasound" range that is outside the range of human hearing. The birds made the right move and in this episode the storms spawned 84 destructive tornadoes in the Appalachians. Once the storm passed the warblers returned to their nesting site.


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Pat Shingleton: "Storm Memories and Reminders..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-storm-memories-and-reminders-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-storm-memories-and-reminders-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 25 Aug 2015 10:30:50 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:
Four "headlining storms" have greatly impacted the Baton Rouge area in multiple ways. The August storm, Andrew in 1992, shut the city down. Katrina's devastation transported thousands of folks to our city.
Gustav was the worst to hit the city and is known as the storm that toppled more trees than any other storm in our history. Six months after the storm, tree removal processes were still in place. Three
year ago this morning Hurricane Isaac made landfall at 3:00 AM at the Mouth of the Mississippi River then beached again at Port Fouchon. It was the ninth tropical cyclone of the season and the fourth
hurricane for 2012. Isaac's storm surge and rain replaced Tropical Storm Allison as the worst flooding storm to hit our area with LaPlace suffering the brundt of the system. 

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Pat Shingleton: "End of the Month Storms" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-end-of-the-month-storms-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-end-of-the-month-storms-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 24 Aug 2015 7:02:56 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

 

Numerous broadcast entities will be recognizing the anniversary of what happened in Louisiana, ten years ago. Before Katrina, Hurricane Andrew was the costliest hurricane in U.S. history. On this date, three years ago, we were tracking Tropical Storm Isaac. Gustav was the worst storm to hit Baton Rouge. Andrew recorded five official landfalls including its final landing as a category 3 storm on our coast. Storms that cause extensive destruction are sealed in our memories. Tonight, 23 years ago, I was in our Weather Center while outside, howling winds swayed our 700 foot antenna. After landfall and the last tornado warning, I left the station to check on the family. Similar to Gustav, Old Goodwood resembled a logging site with oak trees strewn like pick-up sticks, intermingled with transformers and power poles; the first storm of the season - in August.


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Pat Shingleton: "What's the Word..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-what-s-the-word--75439/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-what-s-the-word--75439/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 13 Aug 2015 7:06:30 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

During the Summer months, we have described our June, July and August weather as sticky, stinky, peppery, muggy, stuffy, and collar-pulling  I have used the word "Tabascoey" as another adjective for our summertime weather. Years ago I received a call from a gentleman questioning permission to use "Tabascoey" in my weather forecasts and this column. After numerous barbs, jokes and kidding, he identified himself as the late Paul McIlhenney from the McIlhenny family of New Iberia and Avery Island and of course our famous Tabasco sauce. We clicking away at 32 days remain until we exit Summer and head to Autumn.  During our remaining summertime evenings, my wife Mabyn won't walk "Doggie" because...,"It's too gross."


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Pat Shingleton: "Charting the History of the Charter Oak..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-charting-the-history-of-the-charter-oak--75438/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-charting-the-history-of-the-charter-oak--75438/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 13 Aug 2015 6:56:21 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Our majestic oaks have weathered not only hurricanes and tropical storms but episodes of severe thunderstorms. Most of our oaks can withstand intense winds however, not tree can endure a direct lighting hot. The sap in any tree is quickly "cooked" when a strike hits, splaying the tree. Yesterday's column noted a famous tree, offering how Dutch explorer Adrian Block described an unusually large white oak growing in a clearing on what is now Hartford, Connecticut. In the 1930s, a delegation of Native Americans approached the property's owner where the tree was located. Intending to remove the tree, Samuel Wyllys preserved it because it was planted ceremonially for the sake of peace when their tribe first settled the area. Local legend states that in 1687 the cavity of the tree was cored to hide the Constitution Charter from King James II. At that moment it was renamed the "Charter Oak." August 19th marked the 158th anniversary of the famous tree and on August 21, 1856 it was severely damaged by a fierce wind storm.

    
    

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Pat Shingleton: Flooding and...a Famous Tree" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-flooding-and-a-famous-tree--75437/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-flooding-and-a-famous-tree--75437/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 13 Aug 2015 6:44:20 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Flooding and...a Famous Tree

Often, just that one storm jogs your memory and resonates until your latter years. Some will remember Andrew or Betsy, Rita, Katrina or Gustav. Some will remember this date, August 20, 1969, when a massive clean-up was underway following the landfall of Hurricane Camille. The storm caused flooding and mudslides in the James and York River basins in Virginia. Rainfall totals were 31 inches with 109 fatalities. On August 21, 1856, the 200 year-old majestic white oak tree in Hartford, CT., known as The Charter Oak was destroyed by a fierce wind storm. The tree hid the Charter from King James II in 1687. The tree was selected to hide the Charter from King James in 1687. On August 21, 1984, a late afternoon thunderstorm hit Pueblo Colorado, closing the state fair for one day. Golf ball size hail popped 500 light bulbs on a carnival ride with 9 injuries and $40 million in damage.


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Pat Shingleton: "Hold it Down..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hold-it-down--75436/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hold-it-down--75436/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 13 Aug 2015 6:36:38 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The village of Green Bank is nestled in the Allegheny Mountain Range and may be one of the quietest places on Earth. It's the home of the Green Bank Telescope, operating under the auspices of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In 1958, the Federal Communications Commission created a 13,000-square-mile quiet zone to shield Green Bank's radio telescopes from man-made interference. The National Radio Quiet Zone borders Virginia and West Virginia. Permissible noises include car engines, wind and thunder. Cellphones, Wi-fi radio and designated electronics are regulated, protecting the largest steerable radio telescope. About half the size of the Statue of Liberty, it listens into space, gathering signals originating 14 billion years ago.


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Pat Shingleton: "We'll Keep A Light On for Ya..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-we-ll-keep-a-light-on-for-ya-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-we-ll-keep-a-light-on-for-ya-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 13 Aug 2015 6:32:27 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

 

Louisiana boasts 14 lighthouses, the oldest dating back to 1839.  In August, 1789, the First Congress federalized existing lighthouses. Built by the colonists, funds were appropriated for lighthouses, beacons and buoys. The lighthouse safely directed ships through episodes of fog and storms.  Sound was used to guide ships and in colonial times shore-fired cannons, warned ships away from foggy coastlines.  Fog bells were first used in 1852, a mechanical bell in 1869, a fog trumpet in 1872 and an air siren in 1887.  Members of the Lighthouse Service maintained the lights, performing their duties in extreme hardship.  On August 7, 1939, the administration of the lighthouses was transferred to the Coast Guard.


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Pat Shingleton: "Taking A Powder..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-taking-a-powder--75434/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-taking-a-powder--75434/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 13 Aug 2015 5:59:32 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Baby powder isn't just for the baby, especially at this time of the year. I shared this with our Sports Director, Mike Cauble, noting that many athletes use it before they suit up to reduce sweat and discomfort. I also told him I use the lavender, Johnson's baby powder. He told me to, "Shing, Get Out! of the Sports Department before I call Security..." No worries for me, our security detail was either taking a nap or feeding a bunch of cats in the parking lot....We've had numerous heat advisories and a record high of 103 degrees on Monday, August 10th that shattered a record going back to 1962. Since June, we have alerted our viewers and readers to stay hydrated and take frequent breaks. Talcum and baby powder can cool you down by sprinkling some on your bed sheets. Baby powder also eliminates squeaky floorboards and can assist in untying the hard knot of a shoelace. I gave Mike Cauble a couple of containers of baby powder. He agreed to present them to Coach Les Miles for further verification on discomfort.


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Pat Shingleton: "Jumping and Diving..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-jumping-and-diving-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-jumping-and-diving-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 13 Aug 2015 5:46:32 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In May of 2012, Gary Connery donned a wing suit and performed a 3,000 foot base jump onto 24,000 cardboard boxes in Henley upon Thames for a world record. On July 25th, 2012, Felix Baumgartner freefell for four minutes at 536 mph, opening his chute for the worlds highest sky dive. On this date in 1960, Air Force Captain Joseph Kittenger donned four layers of clothing and left New Mexico in a gondola attached to a helium balloon.  Kittenger went skyward for 19 miles and a never before attempted jump back to earth.  As temperatures dipped to 100 degrees below zero he soared to 102,800 feet and parachuted. He fell for four minutes and 37 seconds and at 14,000 feet his parachute opened, landing safely on the desert floor.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Clothes Line..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-clothes-line-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-clothes-line-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 13 Aug 2015 5:01:13 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Just 40 days remain in the summertime season. Once we roll-out-of August and in September some "teaser' days can be expected.  These are days when a freak cold front slides by, knocks down our temperature and humidity and provides a comfortable Fall tease. However, the summertime convective showers will be with us, customarily popping a shower here and not there... Years ago my brothers and I would settle in to enjoy episodes of the “Three Stooges” on rainy summer afternoons.  However the respite was short-lived when the soggy weather pattern advanced to the next day. The early morning began with the traditional hearty breakfast and with baseball games canceled Mom directed us to seasonal chores; cleaning the basement, attic and garage.  A large compliment of tools and lawn equipment were moved as the garage floor was swept. The basement was swept down, hosed down and straightened. Those were the chores then and except for the basement, it will be a chore this weekend. 


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Pat Shingleton:"Locusts and Mast Arms..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-locusts-and-mast-arms-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-locusts-and-mast-arms-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 13 Aug 2015 4:53:11 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

I seem to be in a routine of identifying where the showers are, rather than where they aren’t...  Recently, folks have been commenting that their yards are dry while others are not. It’s seems we’re anxious for a seasonal change. Even though we experienced a few fronts that have surprisingly slipped through, we await football season and some traditional adjustments. Expect us to exit the 90s on September 18th while we leave the 80s on October 20th.  In the backyard this weekend I heard the sound of what I believed to be a locust.  It brought me back to my summers as a kid and the end of summer sounds and the start of school at Locust Grove School. You may remember video of swinging stop lights during a hurricane or tropical storm. That scene won't be visible in Baton Rouge should future storms slam our area, The Mast Arm is a system of steel posts and arms that are anchored in concrete, 12-feet deep and are built to withstand Category 5 hurricanes.  Miami began installing the Mast Arm in the 1980s and when eight hurricanes hit Florida in 2004 and 2005, more were installed. Installations of the Mast Arm can be seen in Baton Rouge. In years past you may have witnessed hurricane video showing stoplights swinging, blowing, dangling and falling from the hurricane’s force.  The Mast Arm encloses wiring and the stoplights into one unit, eliminating the traditional span-wire traffic signal.  Florida Law requires Mast Arms at all intersections within 10 miles of the coast as Miami-Dade County completed its signal conversions. During recent storms none of the Mast Arms required replacement.

 


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Pat Shingleton: "Direct Hits..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-direct-hits-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-direct-hits-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 12 Aug 2015 5:54:54 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Louisiana’s August storms include Hurricane Camille that scraped the southeast coast on August 17, 1969.  Prior to Gustav, Hurricane Andrew was the worst storm to hit the Baton Rouge area on August 26, 1992 and of course Katrina made landfall on August 29, 2005.  Louisiana ranks first for incidents of direct hurricane hits on the United States mainland and individual states since 1851 with a total of 21 with August and September the most active months. Three of the top four most intense mainland hurricanes, Camille, Katrina and Andrew, struck Louisiana with Katrina the costliest causing $106 million in damage followed by Andrew and Gustav with more than $45 million in damage. On this date in 1766, a powerful hurricane leveled the tiny village of Trois-Islets on the island of Martinique. Joseph-Gaspard Tascher was one of the island's wealthy planters and suffered total financial ruin from the devastating storm.  In dire straits, he did what many attempted in those days; marrying their offspring into money.  After the storm, his young daughter, Marie Josephine Rose, returned to France and married an army officer, the Vicomte de Beauharnais, who was guillotined in 1794.  Two years later she married an officer with a better “head on his shoulders” who crowned himself in 1804 and she became Empress Josephine of France, the wife of Napoleon Bonaparte.


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Pat Shingleton: "Weather and Roads..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-weather-and-roads-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-weather-and-roads-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 11 Aug 2015 7:11:52 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Most often the conversations in Baton Rouge involve two subjects: Weather and Traffic. Occasionally, on my traffic reports at 4:00 PM and when  the traffic jams the Interstate, I will comment to Brittany Weiss that it might be best to take alternate routes. I suggest fictitious routes that include the Parkway East and West, the North and Southbound Loops and the Chunnel.  The Chunnel is a tunnel, similar to Mobile Bay that connects LSU and Plaquemine. There is another fictitious road in Virginia, named the Smart Road. The road is located a few miles from the Virginia Tech campus in rural southwest Virginia.  This stretch of road is 2.2 miles-long and goes nowhere. It was originally constructed in the 1980s and is a unique, state-of-the-art, closed test-bed research facility. Weatherwise Magazine reports that the road is managed by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, maintained by the state's Department of Transportation. The road is a laboratory for testing new transportation technologies. A half-mile portion of the road sports towers that rise 25 feet above that road and are capable of spewing rain, fog and snow to create extreme weather conditions for vehicle testing. The Smart Road creates its own weather by using a 500,000-gallon water tank situated under the road equipt with a 400-horsepower pump that pressurizes the water into feed towers. Two, 700-horsepower, three-stage centrifugal air compressors generate compressed air for fog and snow-making applications. Additional tower hoses can generate an inch to two and a half inches of rain per hour. Super-atomized water is injected into the air and cascades humidity, creating fog. Typical nozzles atomize the water, creating snow. Computerized vehicles will contribute in monitoring road conditions during simulated weather situations.


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Pat Shingleton: "Dig a Hole, Store the Water..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dig-a-hole-store-the-water-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dig-a-hole-store-the-water-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 10 Aug 2015 6:45:20 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Springtime streams have dried up in India. The states of Jammu and Kashmir have experienced dry outs that have complicated agricultural efforts. Mechanical engineer, Sonam Wangchuk did something about it by building a glacier. Wangchuk and his team created artificial glaciers by relocating abundant water from a local stream during the winter months and spraying it onto clay -covered ground. The clay prevents the melt water from seeping into sandy soil and cold, wintry weather, freezes the water and eventually creates a cone of ice. The seasonal change advances a warm weather change and the warm-up melts the artificial glacier, sending needed water into the local farmlands.  Wangchuk has named the formations "ice stupas," after the mounds of relics used by Buddhists for meditation. The Guardian reports that last year, a 6-meter prototype stored 150,000 liters of water was stored and advanced while this year an artificial glacier is 15 meters in height and getting higher. The team's goal is to build 80 to 90 ice stupas, 30 meters in height over the next three years, that will store 1 billion liters of water capable of irrigating 1,500 acres.


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Pat Shingleton: "Anniversaries and The Sweatiest..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-anniversaries-and-the-sweatiest-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-anniversaries-and-the-sweatiest-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 7 Aug 2015 6:59:51 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The National Weather Service predicts that the heat index today will run between 107 and 109 degrees followed by a range of 108 to 110 on Sunday and 110 to 112 on Monday.  A Heat Advisory will be posted from 10:00 AM ON Saturday until 7:00 PM Sunday evening.  Shower activity is virtually non-existent. We've become accustomed to receiving an afternoon shower that will knock the temperature down by 12 degrees. Increased humidity makes the body works harder to cool itself by its own evaporation cooler, better known as sweat.  One of the first signs of dehydration is an elevated body temperature and no sweat.  When wind and cold affect the body during the winter months, the wind chill values are calculated.  During the summer, it’s the Heat Index or the apparent temperature.  Sunstroke, heat cramps and heat exhaustion occur when the index tops 104 degrees. In 2007, deodorant maker, Old Spice named Phoenix, Arizona, as the sweatiest city in America; Las Vegas was number two, Tallahassee, third and Baton Rouge, ninth. This year's list include the tenth sweatiest city as Charlotte, North Carolina. Dallas is ninth  with Los Angeles is in the eighth position. Raleigh is seventh, D.C. sixth, Orlando, fifth, San Diego, fourth, Houston. third and Miami, second. The Sweatiest City for 2015 is Tampa Florida.  Other events on this date include 16 deaths from flooding in Manila in 2012. In 1993 Tropical Storm Bret hit Venezuela with 100 casualties. In 1922, the Pittsburgh Pirates, recorded 46 hits in a double-header against the Phillies and in 2001, the artificial turf at a Phillies game reached 149 degrees as 24 fans were treated for exhaustion.  In 1963 the Kingsmen recorded “Louie-Louie.” In 2007, the strongest tornado since 1889 struck Kings County, N.Y. – a chimney saved one resident from a wall of water. In 2004, lightning struck two teenage boys corralling cattle in Wauneta, NE, knocked unconscious, they survived. Finally, in 1985, baby-boy Michael Shingleton was a day old while outside, Tropical Storm Beryl was 50 miles west of New Orleans, with 40 M.P.H. winds.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Moment, The Bomb..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-moment-the-bomb-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-moment-the-bomb-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 31 Jul 2015 9:41:56 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

History often provides subtle reminders that extend comparisons to our present circumstances. Recent negotiations with representative from Iran may remind us of examples 80 years ago.
Following the bombing of Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, which resulted in 140,000 deaths, the Makurazaki Typhoon hit the city one month later killing 1,200. The second bombing of Japan was scheduled on August 11 but was moved up two days due to expected inclement weather and the originally selected city of Kokura was later changed to Nagasaki.  On August 9, 1945, a B-29 bomber, nicknamed Bockscar, after its commander, Frederick Bock, took-off from the island of Tinian carrying a 9,000 pound plutonium bomb named Fat Man with a blast equivalent of 21 kilotons of TNT.  Two weather observation planes scouted conditions over both target areas.  At 11:02 a.m. on August 9, 1945 the nuclear inferno was unleashed 500 meters above the surface.


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"Let's Float this Idea..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/let-s-float-this-idea-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/let-s-float-this-idea-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 31 Jul 2015 7:06:29 PM Pat Shingleton

In 1874, Robert Green operated a refreshment booth in Philadelphia. On a certain day, Robert ran out of ice and went to his friend's ice cream booth and substituted ice cream for ice. His root beer "floated" the ice cream and a new treat was invented. Today is National Root Beer Float Day and when we were kids Hire's Root Beer Extract was mixed in a crock. Mom would apply yeast, we'd wash used pop bottles and with an antique "bottle capper," we bottled our own "pop." As noted in a previous column,  the final process meant gently placing the bottles in the sunlight and regularly spinning them to reduce any sediment. Too much sun caused "popping" pop. Homemade ice cream or J&T's Frozen Custard provided a great treat. Last year, on this date, my favorite President, Richard Manship, served root beer floats to the entire staff at WBRZ, Channel 2. Unfortunately, Richard is out-of-town so I asked my favorite General Manager, Rocky Daboval, to advance this great tradition... I'll have the rest of the story, tomorrow.


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