WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2016, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Fri, 27 May 2016 16:05:04 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Melatonin and Pants-On-The-Ground" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-melatonin-and-pants-on-the-ground-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-melatonin-and-pants-on-the-ground-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 26 May 2016 10:46:51 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In South Louisiana  atmospheric characteristics offer marvelous sunrises and sunsets.  Research indicates that after sunset there are physical benefits. Scientists have discovered that only when it's really dark can your body produce the hormone melatonin.  Melatonin fights diseases, including breast and prostate cancer.  Small amounts of light around your bed at night switch off the production of melatonin. A dark night may keep certain cancers under control. Light during the evening hours, even emanating from your bedroom television, turns on other immune system hormones that should be activated only in daytime.  If these hormones are depleted, you could be more likely to catch a cold.  Scientists believe nature also needs darkness, as animals' immune systems grow weak if there's artificial light at night.  So turn off everything, enjoy your rest and wake up to enjoy a beautiful sunrise. Finally, years ago, Baker City Council placed "saggy" pants on the agenda which reminded me of a story. We always enjoyed visits to Uncle Sam Biggins' farm.   He was the picture of hard work, always displaying a load of tobacco in his cheek and walking bowlegged to his barn to climb a tractor or bridle  a horse. My visits with young lads remind me of Sam, inquiring if "positioning" britches made them a tad cooler. A few noted that wearing saggy pants, south of the waist, provided some cooling. With a hand on his belt, I questioned one fellow as to the difficulty in strolling "bowlegged"  in the heat of the day? He said he maneuvered a little slower as I assumed less energy exertion caused the cool down. I shared Larry Platt's rap-tune  "Pants on the Ground" with him...he sort of liked it.

 


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Pat Shingleton: "Earthworms and Grunting" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-earthworms-and-grunting-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-earthworms-and-grunting-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 24 May 2016 6:49:23 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

“Night-Crawlers” are large earthworms that move to the surface after a shower or from a garden hose.  The worms were perfect bait at our fishing spots in western Pennsylvania. The garden hose provided the primary ingredient to get the worms to the surface.  After wetting-down a section of the yard around 7 p.m. the harvest occurred at Midnight. My Dad would often share a story about taking his boys to Hereford Manor Lake for a fishing trip. His bowling team and "mush ball" team buddies would provide the right spot for strikes and he couldn't understand why he wasn't snagging a few. As he looked around my brother Kevin and I (Ages 4 and 6) were dropping the worms over the side to feed the fish...  In Florida's Apalachicola National Forest some folks still use the art of "grunting."  By rubbing a curved steel bar over a grounded wooden stake a strange sound is created. The combination of the sound and the vibration irritates the worms, driving them to the surface. Thousands of earthworms pour out of the ground becoming prime fishing bait. For local grunters, 5,000 worms can bring in $1,000 a week.  So if you're grunting or fishing this Memorial Day week, expect some heat and some mostly dry weather.


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Pat Shingleton: "Tuning Up the A.C." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-tuning-up-the-a-c-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-tuning-up-the-a-c-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 23 May 2016 10:29:00 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Open vehicle windows will cool the occupants through evaporation and closed windows reduce automobile drag and possibly less fuel consumption. In 1933, conditioned air was introduced for luxury cars and limousines and Packard’s were the first manufacturers to install them in their 1940 models. Twelve years later, air conditioning became a standard feature in the Chrysler Imperial. Since then, virtually all vehicles have air conditioning and around here it is certainly welcome. Experts suggest opening  the windows before activating the AC controls.  Research indicates that the car dashboard, seats and even air fresheners emit a cancer causing carcinogen called Benzene and a vehicle in direct sunlight at 60 degrees increases Benzene levels by 40 times over acceptable levels. These directives are also identified in your vehicle owner’s manual. Car manufacturers suggest vacating the internal heat by opening the windows first and activating the air conditioner-second.  Researchers at ExxonMobil are extracting citrus oil from orange and lemon peels to eliminate Benzene in vehicles.  The implementation of a hydrocarbon substitute involves manipulating molecules in similar ways that polymers are processed. As dashboards, steering wheels, seat covers and other plastic components have been implemented in the past, future vehicles may include the same components made from citrus products.


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Pat Shingleton: "Multiple Hits and Amelia..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-multiple-hits-and-amelia-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-multiple-hits-and-amelia-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 20 May 2016 7:11:18 PM Pat Shingleton On this date in 1946 Charles Brown of Kenton, Ohio, while checking out a book at the public library,  was struck by lightning.  This was the tenth time that he was hit.  “The Almanac of the Infamous, The Incredible and The Ignored” reports that there have been numerous documented human multiple lightning strikes.  A forest ranger from Waynesboro, Virginia was bopped seven times in a thirty six year stretch.  Cleveland Sullivan lost a toenail while on duty in a fire lookout tower in 1942.  In 1969 a bolt scorched his eyebrows and in 1972 and 1973, lightning lit up his hair.  Carl Mize, known also as Sparky, was hit four times, once on the rodeo circuit and another strike put a hole in his shoe. Finally, on this date in 1932, Amelia Earhart began a solo transatlantic flight from Harbour Grace, Newfoundland. The take-off occurred five years to the day when Charles Lindbergh flew from Long Island to Le Bourget Field in Paris.  Her red Lockheed Vega logged a smooth flight until midnight.  She then hit a severe thunderstorm and decreased her altitude after experiencing ice conditions.  Three hours into the flight her altimeter and gasoline gauges broke. With fuel running down the back of her neck, flames were shooting out of the manifold. Skimming the ocean surface to reduce icing and after 15 hours and 2,026 miles, she landed outside Londonderry, Ireland, becoming the first woman to fly solo across the “pond” and the first person to cross the Atlantic twice by airplane.


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Pat Shingleton: "Humidity and Rittenhouse" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-humidity-and-rittenhouse-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-humidity-and-rittenhouse-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 19 May 2016 7:56:31 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The Rittenhouse Hygrometer was an 18th century invention that registered the relative humidity of the air by using wood as its sensor. David Rittenhouse created this device to register the expansion and contraction of wood detected through the wood’s grain.  If you've ever experienced tree removal a cut tree will display tree rings that are a somewhat accurate measure of a particular tree's life span. Each ring registers to approximately a year. Thicker rings often indicate wetter yearly conditions, thinner rings, dry spells. Wood swells and shrinks about 80 times as much around the growth rings and 40 times as much across the rings.  Rittenhouse took two identically sized strips of mahogany and glued them together to complete a single slat and attached one end to a base. He then placed a tipped pointer on the other end.  When the humidity rose, the strip would significantly swell and forced the slat to bend.  A decrease in humidity found the strip dropping as it would shrink and and bend.  Rittenhouse’s invention is still used today by designers of plywood, laminated floors and layered wood to ensure that these products remain flat as they adjust to the power of relative humidity.


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Pat Shingleton: "Use it Wisely" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-use-it-wisely-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-use-it-wisely-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 18 May 2016 6:53:07 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Most television and radio personalities have been asked to "judge" everything from beauty contests, dance contests and science projects, to name a few. One of the more interesting requests for me was being asked to assist in taste testing water. I vividly remember myself, the late Fran Spain and others determining the best tasting water for the region and the country as samples were collected from numerous locations around the United States. Every judge selected our Baton Rouge "tap" water as the best in taste and smell. A few years ago, Baton Rouge water was judged the second best water in the country. Many companies along the chemical corridor have now switched from tapping our aquifers to tapping the Mississippi River for industrial water needs. There remain a few plants that haven't conformed. Under the leadership of California's Governor, Jerry Brown, drastic measures were enacted in 2015 to conserve water there. Researchers determined that an easy solution is in their backyard. According to the Sacramento Bee, over a billion gallons of treated wastewater from 250 water recycling facilities, are unloaded into the Pacific Ocean each year. The treated wastewater is currently being recycled for irrigation, toilet flushing, and groundwater replenishment. The state's goal last year was to recycle 2.5 million acre feet of water by 2030. We may suffer through the heat, steam and pesky afternoon thundershowers but the fresh water we enjoy now, from our aquifers , is 2000 years old.


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Pat Shingleton: "Ah Choo!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ah-choo-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ah-choo-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 17 May 2016 12:50:24 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The response to someone sneezing is, "God bless you," or "Bless You." This practice originated in 77 AD when it was believed that a person's soul could be tossed from their body when they sneezed. It also opened the body for a Devil invasion. Through the centuries it was also believed that the heart stops beating during a sneeze and could possibly be exacerbated by holding back the sneeze. "Gesundheit," following a sneeze means "good luck or all the best." The wind speed from a common cough has been determined to be around 270 miles per hour and a sneeze is around 100 miles per hour. The Natural Resources Defense Council recently reported that one-in-three Americans reside in the sneeziest and wheeziest cities and regions in the country. Ragweed, pollen and ozone contribute the increase in sneezing. Researchers believe that as climate change warms the planet, millions more Americans could become ill with severe respiratory allergies and asthma. The report has targeted 35 cities where exposure to ragweed and ozone smog is at its highest. The most vulnerable regions are the Los Angeles Basin, the St. Louis area, the Great Lakes Region, the Mid-Atlantic and the Northeast. Of the 35 cities not one is located in Louisiana, Mississippi, or Alabama. Orlando and Dallas are the only cities in Florida and Texas. Four cities are in Pennsylvania, six in Ohio and Los Angeles is the only standout for California. I find it interesting that when I hear folks sneeze during religious ceremonies, no one responds with "God Bless You..."


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Pat Shingleton: "Trying Try-Outs..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-trying-try-outs-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-trying-try-outs-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 16 May 2016 5:29:49 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Rain delays and rain outs are expected until Friday for area baseball practices and games. "Baseball at the Box" tonight could be a rain out or at least a delay and the big series this weekend with Florida should find improving weather. Baseball for us, in our younger days, began in May and ended in August. Our Little League baseball seasons started with a traditional “tryout.” Each kid, with glove in hand, warmed up by playing “catch” and also donning a sign, pinned to the back of their sweatshirt. This sign displayed a huge number that corresponded to the player, and registered his age and any relationships with previous family members and teams. Some kids were grandfathered into a team because an older brother played for a sponsoring organization. The league included: The Elks, The Moose, The Kiwanis, The Lions, The American Legion and The Rotary. Our brothers, Denis and Mike, always played for The Elks as it was assumed that we were also going to do the same. However, Don Huffman wanted Pat and Kevin to join his team, The Rotary. As members of The Rotary another fund-raiser for the teams included, "Poppy-Day."  All of the teams would descend into town on a designated Saturday to solicit contributions in support of the league. All aspects of the game of baseball were practiced and a practice ending shower resulted in “sliding” practice. Hook slides, hand slides and leg tuck slides were practiced. Mom wasn’t very pleased with the muddied, grass stained “jeans” that came in the back door.


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Pat Shingleton: "Out of OUr Tree..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-out-of-our-tree-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-out-of-our-tree-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 13 May 2016 6:24:58 PM Past Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The Animal Planet broadcasts a series entitled “Treehouse Masters” and arboreal architect Pete Nelson’s expertise in showcasing these amazing structures. He’s incorporated his exploits in a book appropriately entitled, “Treehouse.” Baton Rouge native and Cane's "inventor," Todd Graves, has been featured on the broadcast with his unique tree house. During our younger years,  Lutz’s Construction Co. had their shop and dump site adjacent to our neighborhood. The site provided scrap wood that was reused for projects such as soap box derbies and... tree houses.  Our tree houses included strips nailed to a tree providing a  ”ladder” to the top.  There were no “plans’ for the construction, just a handful of kids pounding nails into boards. The tree house test often included a heavy shower and how much water stayed out.  What wasn’t tested was the weight-wind scenario. On a particular occasion, six kids were jammed into a tree house. The fun and excitement was mixed with the sound of cracking and crashing as the tree house turned into a ground house. Fortunately there were only minor injuries and lots of firewood.


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Pat Shingleton: "Apple Whipping and Water Finding" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-apple-whipping-and-water-finding-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-apple-whipping-and-water-finding-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 12 May 2016 6:33:52 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Throughout the history of our country and the world, water is possibly the most 
precious of all commodities. Last year, in California, water rationing prohibited the
application of water for lawn maintenance as many homeowners converted their
lawns from grass to gravel. In the old days, attempts to locate water was called
dowsing and a dowsing rod, divining rod or witching rod was used.The rod was a
Y shaped twig that supposedly jumped upon contact with a water source. Our
grandfather would whittle the rod to educate us as to its benefits. Not that
interested in the historical use of the device and with a multitude of orchards in
the area, we would use the rods as "apple  launchers." By jamming an apple on
the rod and whipping it like a fishing rod, the stick would propel the apple and
increase the velocity.  There were many an "apple whipping" encounters, back in the
day.
My brother Kevin held the record for hitting two heads with one apple from a
"launcher." Kevin first nailed Pumpkin Head Hulick  and the apple ricocheted into
the helmet of Bob "Head" Krestel. When the story was shared with Baton Rouge's
the late Jessie Dominick, he commented, "Kevin and those two all had  heads "like
a lion."


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Pat Shingleton: "Dew-Dew..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dew-dew--84284/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dew-dew--84284/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 10 May 2016 6:39:40 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Dew is water that condenses onto grass and other ground objects. Folktales depict 
the magical qualities of dew. It has been used as a lotion for itchy eyes, skin
diseases, and strengthening sickly children. It is believed to heal  gout and
sharpen eyesight, especially if collected from leaves of fennel. For beauty and luck,
a young girl should gather dew before sunrise from under an oak tree. Washing
your face in dew from a Hawthorn tree at sunrise on the Celtic festival of Beltane
will provide beauty for a year. The Victorians gathered early-morning dew in their
hands and rubbed  it on their faces to remove freckles. Witches in Scotland,
collected it with a hair tie and hung it in the barn to increase milk production.


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Pat Shingleton: May Incidents..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-may-incidents-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-may-incidents-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 9 May 2016 6:49:33 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: May Incidents...

In 2012 the "L.E.M.V." or Long Endurance Multi-Intelligence Vehicle was tested at 
Lakehurst Naval Facility in New Jersey.  This is the same location where the
Hindenburg exploded on May 6, 1937. On February 12, 1935, the U.S.S. Macon  
completed a training mission near Santa Barbara and south of Point Sur and incurred
a batch of squally weather. Once Lt. Commander  Herbert Wiley ordered a maneuver,
a gust jarred the airship's fin. Efforts to control it were futile and before it
plunged into the ocean, Wiley gave the order to abandon ship. With inflatable
vests, rafts and warm water temperatures, all but two  of the 83-member crew
survived. Its sister ship, Akron, crashed two years earlier killing 73. One of the
survivor's was Lt. Commander Wiley.
On May 7, 2011, hydrologists
monitored the record rise of the Mississippi River. The National Weather Service's 
River Flood History posted a timely item. In 1543, Hernando Desoto experienced a 
40 day flood near what-is-now, Memphis. In 1788 a hurricane caused severe flooding
which also marked the arrival of Acadian settlers at Fort Bute, Manchac as they
also set-foot in Baton  Rouge. Another spring-flooding episode occurred in 1825,
known as the last inundation of New Orleans on the lower Mississippi. During
the greatest flood in history, Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover was elected
President, enacting legislation to implement control projects. A year later the
Bonnet Carre Spillway began with a capacity flow that would match Niagara Falls.


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Pat Shingleton: "Always... Mom" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-always-mom-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-always-mom-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 6 May 2016 10:45:16 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Until last August she lived in the house where she was born. Her oldest, Denis, was born in the Spring, Mike in the Summer, Patrick and Kevin in Winter, Maureen and Mark in the Fall. Whether a snowstorm or thunderstorm, she refers to them by saying, “It’s getting bad out there…” Summertime chores were a discipline that included working in the garden with a reminder that what we grew now, we ate in the winter. The grass was cut to make it "look like a park." These chores were followed by sports-related activities or swimming. In the Fall, leaves were raked and piled on the garden. The snowy winters found us clad in snow-pants, boots, hoods, gloves, and home-made stocking hats. She had us so bundled for sled riding that we could hardly move. She was there for her kids and many kids in the neighborhood. To this day, many consider her - their Mom. In my Junior year of high school, I escorted Sue Welsh to our school prom as she requested violets for her corsage.  Mom and her friend, Loraine Blinn trekked into an adjacent forest that we call "the woods" where they picked and collected hundreds of spring violets. The arrangement was advanced to our local florist where Sue’s corsage was constructed. Whether your Mom is alive or deceased, special messages, hugs and appreciation will be extended to our marvelous Moms, this weekend.


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Pat Shingleton: "Great Lakes- Part Two..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-great-lakes-part-two-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-great-lakes-part-two-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 5 May 2016 7:11:35 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Continuing yesterday's identification of the World's Strangest Lakes we head to the Caribbean and "Boiling Lake" in Dominica. A "fumarole" is an opening that releases gas and steam and boils existing water. Located in the Morne Trois Pitons National Park it takes hikers six hours to get there. In Trinidad we note Pitch Lake which is 250 feet deep and is filled with liquid and semisolid asphalt. Water, gas, mineral material and bitumen collect as this lake was mined for many years for asphalt. Pink lakes are located in numerous locations stretching from Lake Retba in Sonegal to Laguna Colorado in Bolivia. The mixture of red bright colors and sunlight give the lakes their name. Exploding lakes are found in Congo. Carbon dioxide eruptions in Lake Nyos in Cameroon in 1986 killed 2000 with losses to livestock at 3500. Beppu Hells in Japan is a top spot for spa goers as the combination of clay and hot water create red and blue shades also referred to as "Bells of Beppu." The final lake on our list is Tonie Sap in Cambodia.  The Asian River receives so much rainfall that it flows backwards.


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Pat Shingleton: "Great Lakes..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-great-lakes-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-great-lakes-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 4 May 2016 11:07:04 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Travel magazine identified twelve of the most unusual lakes in the world. Six of the twelve include Lake Kaindy near the Tien Shan Mountains in Kazakhstan. The lake developed in 1911 when an earthquake triggered a large limestone landslide.  It is referred to as the "Sunken Forest." Lake Kaikal in Russia is 25 million years old and contains 20% of the world's unfrozen fresh water and is also the home of the world's only freshwater seals. Third on the list is Gruner See in Austria.  This lake is located on the edge of the Hochschwab Mountains and rises each year by thirty feet after the spring snow melt. The Spotted Lake in Canada turns into  a psychedelic polka, displaying dotted pools of reflecting various streams of light. The lake is know for its healing powers because of its large concentrations of minerals. Jellyfish Lake in Palau is home to Golden Jellyfish that are unlike our Gulf Coast jellyfish. These jellyfish have a mild, undetectable sting as energy algae-like organisms are stored in their tentacles and are activated as they gravitate toward the rising sun. The Tri-Colored Lakes of Indonesia include craters of Mount Kelimutu on the Indonesian Island of Flores. The lake colors often change from blue to bright green to dark brown or red. More lakes and their unusual characteristics, tomorrow.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Moon and Your Garden" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-moon-and-your-garden-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-moon-and-your-garden-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 3 May 2016 11:39:29 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

When I mentioned to my brother Kevin that I was putting a few vegetables into some planters he reminded me of what our grandfather, Bert Price, would advise.  “Yunz boys better check that thar Moon phase,” said Bert. Our last full moon was Friday, April 22nd.  Every 28 days the moon goes through four phases: new moon, first quarter, full moon and “dark of the moon.”  When the moon is waxing or it appears larger, its gravitational pull is the greatest and affects not only the oceans but everything containing water. Many believe that above ground crops such as leafy vegetables do better on a waxing moon. We're now in a waning moon pattern with our next full moon targeted for May 21st. You may have noticed your vining crops, such as cucumbers, excelling. Possibly you too planted those around March 24th when another waning moon was noted. The theory also suggests that vegetables and flowers  planted on a waning moon draws more water down to the earth.For future gardening remember Bert's words, ".... better check that thar Moon phase!"


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Pat Shingleton: "An Ice Classic" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-ice-classic-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-ice-classic-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 2 May 2016 10:29:14 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The Nenana Ice Classic began in 1917 by bridge builders crossing the Tenana River new Fairbanks, Alaska.  Back then the weather changes also changed the schedules for area laborers. When the river froze-over, work stopped and speculation as to an ice break began the wagering. This classic lottery doesn't match the national payouts but it does provide speculation and excitement. Cash prizes these days are awarded to those who guess the exact minute the ice breaks. The popularity of the event also led to needed validation of the exact time and the distribution of winnings to the melt-down.  A specially constructed tripod contraption determines the winner. Originally made of wooden logs, a wire attached to the top of the device is strung to an onshore clock. The clock stops when the melting ice shifts the tripod 100 feet. Last year there were 24 tickets designating the winning time -3:48 P.M., Alaska Standard Time and the date was April 25th. The jackpot in 2015 was $ 363,627 as 300,000 tickets were sold with 24 winning tickets splitting the prize.At 3:39 PM , April 23rd, 2016 the ice melted and the clock stopped. Winners are currently being identified and contacted.

 


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Pat Shingleton: "Clearing the Desk..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-clearing-the-desk-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-clearing-the-desk-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 29 Apr 2016 7:05:33 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

It's desk, clean-off time and few items, hopefully, of interest. If a baseball at Alex Box Stadium-Skip Bertman Field is blasted into humid air it will travel father than in dry air provided the force and trajectory are the same.  If the earth were the size of a billiard ball, it would be smoother and closer to a perfect sphere.  The widest tornado ever recorded touched down in Nebraska in March 2004. At its widest point, the twister measured 2.5 miles in diameter and traveled 62 miles.  To determine the effect that sustained high temperatures have on the human body, Dr.Craig Taylor once subjected himself to 250 degrees Fahrenheit for 14 and a half minutes without serious medical complications. Discarded liners previously used to encase offshore oil-rig piping were once recognized as a model of “green” engineering and were later recycled for another important use. In tornado prone areas, storm shelters provide valuable protection and the National Storms Shelter Association  tests products to improve storm shelters. The Texas Tech Debris Impact Test Facility fired 15-pound two-by-fours from a pressure cannon that did not penetrate the panels. The wooden projectiles hit the discarded liners at 100 mph, replicating objects that exit a funnel cloud.  Applying modern materials science to storm shelters started after Hurricane Katrina and was advanced after 62 tornadoes ravaged Alabama. The newly designed panels are made of thermoplastic and fiberglass resins and fibers and are stronger per density unit than steel, currently used in shelters. Michael Cauble mentioned the gimmicks ball parks use  to entertain the crowds.  My brother Kevin and I reminisce about our trips to Forbes Field in Pittsburgh during our Little League years.  There were no gimmicks at this ball park, just baseball.  Hab Shingleton would load his sons into the station wagon and head to a double header.  Of course we had our Wilson glove with us just in case we snagged one during batting practice or during the game.  Dick Stuart was at first, Billy Maz at second, Smokey Burgess behind the plate, Roberto in right and of course the Voice of the Pirates, Bob Prince.  As for concessions - it was Mom’s meatloaf sandwiches on homemade buns and a thermos of Kool-Aid. We say goodbye to April and rewind to some interesting weather events on this date.


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Pat Shingleton; "Lightning Consequences" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lightning-consequences-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lightning-consequences-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 28 Apr 2016 10:50:57 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton;

Yesterday the National Weather Service confirmed a lightning fatality in St. Tammany Parish that occurred during the morning outbreak of storms. Around 300 A.D. a pagan father was so enraged with his daughter that he confined her to a tower and in her forced solitude she converted to Christianity.  After discovering her conversion the father also learned that she had three windows installed in a bathhouse to honor the Holy Trinity.  His first attempt to kill his daughter was unsuccessful as she escaped after an opening mysteriously appeared in the wall confining her. A shepard betrayed her and she was tortured however her wounds healed instantly. The shepard was reportedly turned to stone and his sheep to locusts. Finally, her father beheaded her and following the decapitation he was killed by lightning.  His daughter was anointed Saint Barbara Dioscorus, the patron saint of lightning victims and her Feast Day is celebrated on December 4th. British military officer, Major R. Summerford while on the battlefield in Flanders in February 1918, was knocked off his horse by a stroke of lightning, paralyzing him from the waist down. In 1924, while fishing with two friends, lightning hit him again, paralyzing his entire right side. In 1934 a third lightning strike hit him, leaving him permanently paralyzed.  Two years later he died and was buried. Just after his internment, another bolt of lightning struck the cemetery destroying the tombstone of Major Summerford.


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Pat Shingelton: "Garden Preps..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingelton-garden-preps-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingelton-garden-preps-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 27 Apr 2016 11:01:19 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingelton:

On our 4,5,6 and 10 PM weathercasts we are encouraging viewers to forward their pics of flowers and vegetables. In addition, I thought of my Mom last weekend while planting tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers in our patio pots. Container gardening wasn't popular "back in the day."  In Pennsylvania, my grandfather would “turn-over” the garden with a shovel until he was convinced to let Mr. Hollenbeck “disc it up” with his tractor. A few years ago, Mom was still able to prepare for one of her first crops of the season – rhubarb, followed by leaf lettuce, beans, tomatoes and sweet corn that should be “knee high by the Fourth of July.”  She would remove ground cover from her rhubarb and would always have a bumper crop for nearly ten years. She was the sole provider of rhubarb for the produce manager at the local Giant Eagle who compensated her “six bucks per pound.”  Sylvia Weatherspoon verifies her rhubarb pie with strawberries is the absolute best.


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