WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Weather - Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2014, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Mon, 28 Jul 2014 14:07:27 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: Thanks a lot Doug http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-thanks-a-lot-doug/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-thanks-a-lot-doug/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 27 Jul 2014 8:14:22 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Thanks a lot  Doug

As noted in Sunday's column, heat waves initiated cool-downs. Years ago, the inflatable pool was "shot-up" by Doug Kelly's B.B. gun. Mom instructed us to fill the wash tub with cold water and stick my brother Kevin in there for a few days. He enjoyed it even though his lips were purple. Once Dale and Thelma Lutz built a swimming pool, they invited the entire neighborhood to seek relief. Brother Mike would drop a Baby Ruth bar in to "clear the pool." When my wife and I visit Rainbow Delights on North Harrell's Ferry, inevitably, I get a "brain-freeze." It also happened to Kevin at J and T Custard Stand where the Krebs family delivered an ice-cream beyond compare. Kevin kept cool during the summer months with purple lips and a headache.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Washtub, more than washing..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-washtub-more-than-washing-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-washtub-more-than-washing-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 26 Jul 2014 2:19:41 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The Heat Index could register above the 100 degree mark this weekend. Keep the A.C. humming, the ceiling fans rotating and stay hydrated. As noted in a previous column, my mother instructed me to "fill the washtub" so that my brother Kevin would get a "cool-down" during episodes of blistering weather in Pennsylvania. That same wash tub was also used to ice down beer and pop for summertime events. The washtub became obsolete when inflatable pools came along and another invention - the lawn sprinkler - offered another quick cool-down as we dashed through it. As we got older, the Ewing Park Swimming Pool provided heat relief. One of the best neighborhood gifts was the decision by the Shultz and the Lutz families to install backyard pools.

 


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Pat Shingleton: "A Melt Down..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-melt-down-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-melt-down-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 25 Jul 2014 4:22:41 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The Daily Telegraph reports that the bodies of more than 80 soldiers from World War I have been recovered from melting glaciers. Experts from the Archaeological Heritage Office in Trento, Italy report that the mummified bodies of the soldiers were discovered near the small northern town of Peio. Glaciers began to melt in the 1990s and the first evidence of mail, apparently written by the soldiers, began flooding from the mountains into the town. Bodies then began to emerge that were amazingly well preserved due to the ice. Two soldiers died on the Presena Glacier in May, 1918 and were discovered in the crevasse. Weather was an enemy to both sides and at 12,000 feet the temperature plunged to -30 degrees. Avalanches also took many lives.


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Pat Shingleton: "Only YOU Can Prevent..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-only-you-can-prevent-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-only-you-can-prevent-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 24 Jul 2014 4:01:50 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

It's been a tough season for wildfires in the West and Pacific Northwest. The Carlton Complex Fire in Seattle is still burning. Lighting sometimes causes these fires. In 1945 Albert Staehle drew a uniformed bear with a name inspired by New York City fireman, "Smokey Joe" Martin, becoming Smokey Bear. In 1947, Smokey's trademark slogan, "Only You Can Prevent Forest Fires," was added with Washington disc jockey Jackson Weaver as the voice of Smokey. As noted in a previous column, in 1948, Forest Service artist, Rudy Wendelin presented the renderings of the fire prevention bear and The Smokey the Bear Act was passed by Congress, regulating the commercial use of the name and image; becoming the most popular symbol in the United States in 1952.


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Pat Shingleton: "Dog Tired" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dog-tired-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dog-tired-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 23 Jul 2014 4:05:07 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Canis Major or Sirius was designated the "Dog Star" by ancient astronomers. As noted in a previous column, Romans believed that Sirius rose at sunrise, convinced this star was the cause of hot, sultry weather. To appease the rage of Sirius and believing that the star created the weather pattern, they sacrificed a brown dog, thus the reference-Dog Days. Ancient Rome catalogued the Dog Days from July 24 through August 24 and The Old Farmer's Almanac designates these 40 days from July 3rd to August 11th. Since June 20th, the sun has reached its highest point and slowly begins its track toward the equator. In 2012 there were two 101 degree days. Last year July 12th was the hottest at 96 and this year our hot days were July 1, 11 and 12.


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Pat Shingleton: "Father Hurricane" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-father-hurricane-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-father-hurricane-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 22 Jul 2014 3:42:27 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On this date in 1893, Father Benito Vines died in Havanna, Cuba. Father Vines is regarded as the preeminent hurricane scholar of the 19th century. As director of the observatory at Belen College in Havana in 1870, he catalogued meticulous weather observations and conditions, especially during tropical disturbances. His observations became a climatological catalog for future forecasts. Notations included excerpts expressing brick-red sunsets, pounding surf and evaporating cumulus clouds at the approach of a hurricane. His keen sense of weather allowed him to understand the dynamics of cyclones and by 1875 he issued accurate hurricane warnings. He is recognized as "Father Hurricane" and invented the Antilles Cyclonoscope for mariners.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Cone Did It!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-cone-did-it-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-cone-did-it-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 21 Jul 2014 3:54:10 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

This month, you may have been thinking of Abe Doumar, Albert Kabbaz, Arnold Fornachou or David Avayou. All claim the invention of the ice cream cone. July is Ice Cream Month and the Library of Congress identifies Charles E. Menches as the inventor. He and his brother Frank also claim the invention of the hamburger in Hamburg, New York. They originally topped Parisian waffles with ice cream then wrapped warm waffles around a cone-shaped splicing tool for tent ropes, to create the cone. Syrian immigrant, Ernest Hamwi contended that he provided the Menches boys with zalabia, another waffle concoction when they ran out of glass cups. In 1903, Italo Marchiony patented a pastry cup machine for ice cream. Cool off Wednesday, it's Ice Cream Day.


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Pat Shingleton: This is a Stick-Up! http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-this-is-a-stick-up-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-this-is-a-stick-up-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 20 Jul 2014 2:47:59 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: This is a Stick-Up!

When Frank Epperson was 11, he took a wooden stir stick, placed it in soda pop and placed it outside one wintry New York evening. As noted in a previous column, Frank enjoyed the frozen treat the next day. In 1923, Frank used a Birch tongue depressor to hold the frozen delight and applied for a patent for his "frozen ice on a stick;" calling it the "Eppsicle Ice Pop." Frank's children encouraged him to change the name to "Popsicle" and later sold his idea to the Joe Lowe Company. Good Humor Ice Cream now holds the rights and during the Great Depression two Popsicles were joined together and named "Twin Popsicles." In addition, popsicle sticks have been used for a variety of arts and crafts projects.


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Pat Shingleton: "Carrier did it" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-carrier-did-it-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-carrier-did-it-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 19 Jul 2014 2:57:18 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

During our summer afternoon's the convective showers and thundershowers can drop the temperature from 92 degrees to 77 in 20 minutes. Air conditioning crews stay busy preparing and repairing the "A.C." units making sure they are "humming along." As mentioned in previous column, last Friday marked the 111th anniversary of the invention of modern air conditioning. In the 1900s, a Brooklyn printing plant was the first building in the world to be air conditioned by Dr. Willis Haviland Carrier. Older Baton Rouge homes utilized an attic fan to move air from room to room. Carrier's cooling plant divided air into two streams, one heated, another cooled. In each room, these two air streams are proportionately mixed to produce a desired temperature.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Big One, The Another" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-big-one-the-another-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-big-one-the-another-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 18 Jul 2014 3:55:11 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Following the Johnstown Pennsylvania Flood of 1889, a flood control system was constructed in the Little Conemaugh Valley to withstand a 100 year flood. Experts declared that the city of Johnstown was flood-proof. As noted in a previous column, on July 19, 1977 in west Taylor Township, northwest of Johnstown, a foot of rain fell and the Laurel Dam burst. The deluge was once again heading for Johnstown with a wall of water in its wake. The second Johnstown Flood in 88 years caused $325 million in damage in seven counties and killed 77. On a hillside above the city white crosses mark the graves of 777 unidentified dead from the flood of 1889, corresponding exactly to the month and year of the second-worst flood in Johnstown's history.


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Pat Shingleton: "Lightning Oddities" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lightning-oddities--62605/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lightning-oddities--62605/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 17 Jul 2014 4:23:09 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On this date in 1689, lightning zapped the altar church of Saint-Sauveur, in Ligny, France. Fifty witnesses watched a statue of Christ levitate and as noted in a previous column, altar cloths were scorched and curtains were blown off their rings but the rings remained on the rod. In 1812, in Combe Hay, Somerset, U.K., six sheep were killed by lightning and witnesses noticed tattooed pictures of the landscape on their skin. Two similar incidents occurred in Greece where a sailor, struck by lightning, had a shadowgraph of the number 44 on his body; attached to a nearby rigging. Another sailor, in the Adriatic was hit while sitting below the mast. Imprinted on his groin was the image of a horseshoe, nailed to the foremast.


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Pat Shingleton: "Lightning Oddities" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lightning-oddities-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lightning-oddities-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 17 Jul 2014 3:54:02 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On this date in 1689, lightning zapped the altar church of Saint-Sauveur, in Ligny, France. Fifty witnesses watched a statue of Christ levitate and as noted in a previous column, altar cloths were scorched and curtains were blown off their rings but the rings remained on the rod. In 1812, in Combe Hay, Somerset, U.K., six sheep were killed by lightning and witnesses noticed tattooed pictures of the landscape on their skin. Two similar incidents occurred in Greeze where a sailor, struck by lightning, had a shadowgraph of the number 44 on his body; attached to a nearby rigging. Another sailor, in the Adriatic was hit while sitting below the mast. Imprinted on his groin was the image of a horseshoe, nailed to the foremast.


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Pat Shingleton: "How's This for Openers?" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-how-s-this-for-openers-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-how-s-this-for-openers-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 16 Jul 2014 4:22:46 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The British Open begins today and the four day weather expectations include partly sunny skies and light winds. Heavy showers will erupt on Saturday with windy conditions and temperatures dipping to 60 degrees by Sunday. Beginning in 1860, this is the oldest of the four major tournaments. Weather has always been an important element in the play of golf professionals. Drought-like conditions resulted in super fast greens and even faster fairways. At the Royal Liverpool Golf Club the tricky maritime weather will be evident from start to finish. The links courses have no trees, a few walls, plenty of deep pot-bunkers and thick fescue grass. Veterans like Phil Mickelson remember previous weather experiences to adjust their play for the Claret.


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Pat Shingleton: "Peak Heat..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-peak-heat-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-peak-heat-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 15 Jul 2014 3:49:27 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The National Climatic Data Center analyzed climate data from 1981 to 2010 and constructed a map depicting the peak summer heat. Most locations will experience a lot more summer weather and haven't experienced their warmest day of the year. For the southwest, the warmest weather traditionally occurs before the end of June. Phoenix and Tucson report average highs at or near 100 degrees throughout the summer. For our area, high heat and humidity assist in activating convective showers that drop our daytime highs by 15 degrees. Along the West Coast, the summer peak doesn't kick-in until fall. Inland air heats and rises over the top of cool, dense air that hugs the coast. This causes an inversion that traps the chill on California's coast.


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Pat Shingleton: "Cooling Down a Hot Head" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-cooling-down-a-hot-head-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-cooling-down-a-hot-head-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 14 Jul 2014 8:37:19 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Statistically, nearly 25 million cloud-to-ground lightning hits occur each year. The yearly average reflects 52 people killed each year from direct or near hits. Lightning can strike within ten miles of a thunderstorm. After completing some chores and assignments Sunday evening I decided to adhere to my exercise schedule by taking a "run" through the neighborhood on my usual route. It normally takes me 37 minutes to complete the 3.8 mile jaunt and at the half-way point, I heard the distant rumble of thunder. Within another five minutes the strong, comfortable showers erupted, cooling me down. I even opened up my mouth for a few refreshing drops. I have mentioned many times, "when you hear the thunder, get indoors." I made it home in time.


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Pat Shingleton: "Kids in the E.R." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-kids-in-the-e-r-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-kids-in-the-e-r-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 13 Jul 2014 3:05:06 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The British Medical Journal reports that emergency room visits for kids increase as temperatures increase. An online edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal, based their research on patterns of hospital treatments in 21 emergency rooms throughout England. Their data found that a five degree increase in temperature, increased admissions for kids. A drop in temperature by five degrees increased adult admissions by 3% and increasing snowfall elevated the admissions to 8%. Authors of the report studied numerous trauma units over various locations for an extended period of time, recognizing a strong relationship between recorded weather and trauma admissions. This analysis could better prepare hospital staff for changes in admission rates.


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Pat Shingleton: "Whew doggies" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-whew-doggies-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-whew-doggies-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 12 Jul 2014 2:47:27 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Saturday's column recognized the hottest spot in the United States, Death Valley, and a reading of 134 degrees on July 10,1913; the highest temperature in North America and worldwide until September 13, 1922 when El Azizia, Libya, reported 136 degrees. The Death Valley reading was recorded at Furnace Creek Ranch from July 8th through the 14th,1913. A maximum temperature of 127 degrees was logged each day, never dropping below 85. Historians contend that the temperature could have been higher because the Weather Bureau thermometer was calibrated to 135 degrees while other thermometers recorded higher readings. In 1949, climatologist Arnold Court determined that the 134 degree reading has a probability of occurring only once in 650 years.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Hottest" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-hottest-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-hottest-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 11 Jul 2014 4:54:25 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Death Valley National Park incorporates 5,000 square miles in California's Mojave Desert in the Sierra Nevada mountain range. The range includes 11,000 foot above sea level peaks. Badwater Basin is 28 feet below sea level. This area records an average rainfall of about two inches per year. Cooler, moisture-laden air from the Pacific rapidly dries and heats as it slides toward the valley floor, a process known as adiabatic warming. Weather observations in the area date back to 1861 and official record keeping began in 1911 when the U.S. Weather Bureau established an Furnace Creek Ranch. On July 10, 1913 a maximum temperature of 134 degrees was recorded, remaining the hottest on record for the United States.


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Pat Shingleton: "Bing!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bing-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bing-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 10 Jul 2014 4:32:41 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In the 1800s, a Chinese-American gardener found a sapling near an orchard brush pile. The slow, patient propagation of the tree advanced its survival for generations. As noted in a previous column, his name was Bing and today his cherries arrive from the high altitudes of the Pacific Northwest. Starry nights and cold mountain snowmelt produce the world's finest cherries. Years ago, we enjoyed sweet cherries that belonged to our neighbors, Harry Schott and Vivian Van Gorder. They didn't mind us climbing, picking and eating the sweet fruit. On our property the neighbors enjoyed concord grapes, apples, peaches, and plums. Also available were "sour" cherry trees that provided a better cherry for Mom's famous cherry pie and cobbler.


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Pat Shingleton: "When the Ark Was Needed" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-when-the-ark-was-needed-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-when-the-ark-was-needed-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 9 Jul 2014 4:26:01 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

With the persistent wet weather, I located a letter in my files from Doug Haley who catalogued Earth's heaviest recorded rainfall. He noted that 383 inches of rain per hour fell during the Great Flood of the Bible, approximately 4,461 years ago. Citing Genesis 7:12 he writes: "The duration of rainfall was 40 days and 40 nights." He noted Genesis 7:19, "...and all the hills that were under the whole Heaven were covered." In his letter to me, Mr. Haley calculated that the water rose to a height of 15 cubits or 22.5 feet above the highest mountain, which was Mt. Everest, at a height of 29,028 feet "in order to kill mountain goats and creeping things." The diagrams of Mr. Haley's calculations to prove his point were quite extraordinary.


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