WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Weather - Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2014, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Thu, 2 Oct 2014 06:10:04 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: Kud Who? http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-kud-who--65161/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-kud-who--65161/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 30 Sep 2014 9:39:41 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Kud Who?

Weed pulling is a year-round chore in South Louisiana. "The vine that ate the South" is the kudzu plant, native to Asia and introduced to the United States in the 19th Century. As noted in a previous column, the vine was classified as a pest weed by the Department of Agriculture 50 years ago. In addition to being a nuisance, scientists determined it aids in the formation of low-level ozone. Researchers compared kudzu growth in Georgia to regions where it was absent noting that the kudzu sections held twice as much nitric oxide emissions. When nitric oxide interacts with sunlight, ozone or photochemical smog occurs. The National Academy of Science revealed that kudzu covers 7.9 million acres in the Southeast, spreading 124,000 acres each year.


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Pat Shingleton: Loggin' the Weather http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-loggin-the-weather/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-loggin-the-weather/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 29 Sep 2014 11:16:03 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Loggin' the Weather

Years ago, manual weather readings were conducted at the Baton Rouge Weather Service Office. This exercise constituted data collection from instrumentation and other observations. For the last 118 years, an observer has recorded daily temperature readings and observations at a remote location and nature area, 90 miles north of New York City. The Montauk Preserve weather station has been monitored by a long line of family and friends. As noted in a previous column, the station recorders have used the same method of data collection for more than 43,353 readings. Experts suggest that it is incredibly rare to have a level of continuity at this site as scientists wrestle to ensure temperature readings from thousands of other stations are accurate.


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Pat Shingleton: Your Pic Could Win! http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-your-pic-could-win-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-your-pic-could-win-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 28 Sep 2014 12:45:35 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Your Pic Could Win!

Each year Weatherwise Magazine conducts a photo contest. Contestants compete for a grand prize, a first prize, two second prizes, three thirds and honorable mentions. Entries range from atmospheric phenomena to seasonal images and drastic storms. Hopefully the mention of the contest will encourage local photographers to capture weather items and participate. Louisiana certainly has its share of interesting weather items and I haven't noted any winners from our area. Weatherwise website: www.weatherwise/org showcases the contest rules. In 2014, the Grand Prize went to Marcus Prazniak of El Cerrito, CA. Tony Bergantino of Laramie, Wyoming captured the first prize and Michael Garfield from Buffalo Grove, Indiana secured the second prize.


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Pat Shingleton: An apple a day http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-apple-a-day/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-apple-a-day/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 27 Sep 2014 2:49:41 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: An apple a day

The apple harvest is underway in northern orchards. Our backyard provided a good crop for everyone. Mom secured enough produce to "put up" apple sauce, apple butter and freezer apples for pies and cobblers. To compliment refrigeration, a basement or spring house provided a "climate controlled" environment for turnips, potatoes, carrots, peaches and apples. Another location was an abandoned well. Our Dad and Grandfather devised a means of "basketing" apples, attached to a rope and lowered into the well; above the water line. An apple urge sent Dad outdoors on a cold winter night. Attempting to retrieve the crisp treat he felt less rope tension and heard the splash. Cold weather above the 14 inch freeze-line snapped the line.


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Pat Shingleton: A Cut Above the Rest http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-cut-above-the-rest/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-cut-above-the-rest/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 26 Sep 2014 12:56:42 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: A Cut Above the Rest

George Washington carried one and Mark Twain wrote of a "real Barlow" in "Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn" in 1876. A Barlow is classified as a penknife however original penknives didn't have folding blades; resembling a scalpel and designed to thin and point writing instruments known as quills. Both knives were used for whittling which is an exercise in cutting small bits or pare shavings from a piece of wood. No matter what the season, Bert Price, our grandfather, not only carried a Barlow but also whittled. When we would ask "Gramps" to borrow his Barlow he would fold his newspaper, spit some tobacco juice and retrieve his precious knife from his overalls, saying, "Now mind, that Barlow is sharp and cuts two inches ahead of its shadow."


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Pat Shingleton: Two Seasons or Four? http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-two-seasons-or-four-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-two-seasons-or-four-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 24 Sep 2014 6:49:49 AM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III Pat Shingleton: Two Seasons or Four?

Some South Louisiana residents believe we only enjoy two seasons: summer and winter. I believe there is evidence to support all four, experiencing the heat of summer, cool of fall, our December snow episodes, including ice pellets that we experienced last January and our crisp spring's. I personally experience the end of winter when the trees begin budding and those spectacular sunny, blue-skied days just after St. Patrick's Day. As noted in a previous column, the love bugs are lingering and while you enjoy your daily walk, notice the number of acorns piling up on our "side" streets, suggesting another episode of ice this winter. Often, these "natural" occurrences may offer some hints of our chilly weather to come.


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Pat Shingleton: "2005-The Worst Season" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-2005-the-worst-season-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-2005-the-worst-season-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 23 Sep 2014 2:59:44 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On the morning of Saturday, September 24, 2005 at 2:38, Hurricane Rita made landfall at Johnson's Bayou in Cameron Parish. The Category Three Hurricane posted winds of m.p.h. making it the fourth most intense Atlantic hurricane. Rita followed Katrina, causing damage in two cities on each end of our state. My column from September 23, 2005 noted, "For the first time in 25 years Gulf temperatures are above 90 degrees." The Saturday storm prompted the LSU Athletic Department to re-schedule the LSU-Tennessee game to a first-time Monday night contest. WBRZ Sports Director MIke Cauble noted, "It was Coach Les Miles' first home game with unbearable weather conditions." LSU led 21-0, losing in overtime in uncomfortable, muggy, steamy conditions.


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Pat Shingleton: "It's Coloring Time..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-it-s-coloring-time-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-it-s-coloring-time-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 22 Sep 2014 4:01:13 PM Pat Shingleton Pat  Shingleton:

Now that it's Autumn, folks in the Northeast will enjoy the changing-of-the-leaves. Each leaf contains anthocyanins that act like a sunscreen and once the chlorophyll breaks down, photosynthesis slows This process retards the absorption of light and excess light damages the leaves. Researchers determined that nutrient-poor leaves, low in nitrogen, causes the intense red color of sugar maple leaves. The peak foliage dates for Maine are October 1st through the 21st with New Hampshire offering displays from September 28th through October 21st. Vermont's best viewing dates are October 5th through the 28th. The Farmer's Almanac has the best times for peak foliage dates and designates Louisiana's peak from November 2nd through November 11th.


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Pat Shingleton: Winter, Spring, Summer and Now. http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-winter-spring-summer-and-now-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-winter-spring-summer-and-now-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 21 Sep 2014 2:44:07 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Winter, Spring, Summer and Now.

At 9:29 tonight, the Sun slides across the equator, initiating the autumnal equinox. Before the designation of seasons, cultures recognized seasons as either rainy or dry. Others recognized them as growing, harvesting and winter, while others have marked ten or more seasons. The designation of four seasons has a definitive beginning and end with key moments when the Earth moves around the Sun. Equinox is Latin for "equal night." This isn't the case at the exact moment of the autumnal equinox for two reasons, sunrise and sunset occur when the Sun's top edge crosses the horizon. Earth's atmosphere changes the Sun's apparent position when it is low. Fall and spring equinoxes are the only times when the Sun rises due east and sets due west.


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Pat Shingleton: Enjoying A Pod, Under the Arbor http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-enjoying-a-pod-under-the-arbor/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-enjoying-a-pod-under-the-arbor/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 20 Sep 2014 3:05:09 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Enjoying A Pod, Under the Arbor

Grapes have advanced to one of the "top crops" for Louisiana. They were also a staple for us in our younger years in Pennsylvania. As noted in a previous column, residents would sink posts, connect bailing wire and plant the young vines in late February or early March. Our vines were very old, producing enough sweet grapes for consumption and for our Mom to "can" jars of grape jelly. Our neighbor, Lee Whitmire, had a larger, more developed arbor that enclosed a portion of his backyard. His arbor seemed to be always loaded with grapes and also served as a quiet, comforting and inviting space. I remember sitting next to my grandfather, under the arbor's shade, in late summer. They would solve the problems of the world while I ate fresh grapes.


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Pat Shingleton: "From the Garden to the Freezer" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-from-the-garden-to-the-freezer-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-from-the-garden-to-the-freezer-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 19 Sep 2014 4:02:54 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Recent wet weather has slightly delayed our sugarcane harvest. The purchase of the "deep-freezer" by my dad in the 1960s became a storage locker for the fruits and vegetables from our garden in Ellwood City, PA. As noted in a previous column, fruit trees included: apple, pear, peach, plum and a grape arbor; producing enough fruit for jams and jellies and an apple pie throughout the year. Our family garden provided tomatoes, beans, potatoes, carrots, lettuce and rhubarb. In September, tomatoes were "pureed," complimenting a recipe my brother Kevin still uses in his famous spaghetti sauce. The sweet corn harvest initiated our family "assembly-line" process of ears being blanched, cut from the cob, packed and loaded into the "deep freeze.


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Pat Shingleton: "Busy as a ______..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-busy-as-a-______-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-busy-as-a-______-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 18 Sep 2014 4:02:23 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Thursday's column identified China as the most dammed country. Another dam builder is the beaver. Their dams, canals and lodges protect them from predators, provide a food source and building materials. When startled, beavers initiate an alarm on their quiet pools by energetically smacking the water with their broad tail; forwarding a danger message to others. Stockpiled sticks provide a winter food source and a means of insulation. Snow pack prevents water from freezing around their homes. Often, the removal of existing beaver dams causes flash flooding of residential areas. In the protection of their habitat, conservation groups note that the beaver also assists humans by preventing residential flooding and roadway wash outs.


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Pat Shingleton: "Dams, Slowing Down Earth" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dams-slowing-down-earth-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dams-slowing-down-earth-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 17 Sep 2014 3:58:09 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

China was the first to be named in 2007 and still leads that list as the most dammed nation in the world. The United States is second, followed by India, japan, Spain and Canada. In 140 countries, 47,
665 large dams exist. Scientists believe that the weight of their water alters the speed of the Earth's rotation. Outside Magazine reports that one-fifth of the world's electricity is generated from them, providing beneficial irrigation for one-sixth of the world's food supply. During the construction of hydro-electric dams, 80 million people have been displaced. Experts also believe that dams inhibit fish migration and alter water flow in addition to adjusting temperatures. In recent years more than 212 dams have been torn down.


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Pat Shingleton: "The 16th of September..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-16th-of-september-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-16th-of-september-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 16 Sep 2014 3:54:03 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On September 16, 2010, Hurricanes Igor and Julia made it to Category 4 status. This marked the first time since September 16, 1926 that two Category 4 hurricanes existed in the Atlantic at the same time for just six hours. September 16, 1999 marked a day of unprecedented devastation for North Carolina. Hurricane Floyd unloaded 20 inches of rain with flooding never before experienced in the Carolina's. Sewage, flowing from the Cape Fear River, stretched 50 miles past Wilmington and 20 miles into the Atlantic. Municipal treatment plants overflowed with fears of environmental disasters from gas station chemicals, factories spewing chromium along with mercury, hog and chicken waste. Since '99, eco-systems were surprisingly flushed free.


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Pat Shingleton: "Your Data, This Storm..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-your-data-this-storm-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-your-data-this-storm-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 15 Sep 2014 3:42:45 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The Gulf water temperature is at its highest, conducive for tropical storm development. Researchers at the University of Miami have joined forces to achieve dual goals. Atmospheric scientists and marine biologists are predicting the severity of tropical storms and evaluating fish migration. Since 2001, one team has been tagging large pelagic fish such as tarpon, with satellite linked sensors that measure ocean temperature, depth, light level and salinity. Sharks have also been tagged for the last four years as researchers noticed they follow a line of water that is 79 degrees F, a reading that is also the lower-bound temperature for tropical storms. Data is transmitted in real time and fish in a storm area will assist in predicting storms.


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Pat Shingleton: "Thirsty Grapes" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-thirsty-grapes-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-thirsty-grapes-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 14 Sep 2014 7:18:27 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

California feeds the nation in a variety of agricultural products. Typically and on average they receive around 30 inches of rainfall. As they await their rainy season, that begins in October, last February there had only been 3.5 inches of rain. Recent rain events have caused flooding in some locations. The state's winemakers are very nervous and in Napa Valley grape farmers normally receive all of their water from rainfall that collects in rivers and reservoirs. Blame it on a ridge of high pressure that has diverted the polar jet stream. Last year was the driest on record since the 1840s and grape farmers are considering new approaches. Without compromising quality, farms may be downsized while watering patterns are possibly altered.


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Pat Shingoeton: "Just One Pane" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingoeton-just-one-pane-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingoeton-just-one-pane-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 14 Sep 2014 6:45:47 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingoeton:

Saturday's column shared the events of The Cathedral of the Nativity in Biloxi. Erected 26 feet above sea-level, it endured 145 m.p.h. winds that rattled its beautiful stained glass windows during Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. Father Tony Arguelles road out the storm inside the Cathedral and provided testimony to Father Vic Messina. The wind-field suddenly blew-out one stained glass pane in the apex of the church that depicted St. Theresa of Lizoux, known as St. Theresa of the Child Jesus. At that moment, the pressure inside the Cathedral immediately diminished and the remaining windows stopped rumbling. The Church recognizes St. Theresa's death on Sept. 30, 1897 at the age of 24 and her vows of ministry in doing good on Earth.


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Pat Shingleton: "Just One Pane" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-just-one-pane-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-just-one-pane-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 13 Sep 2014 9:46:22 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Saturday's column shared the events of The Cathedral of the Nativity in Biloxi. Erected 26 feet above sea-level, it endured 145 m.p.h. winds that rattled its beautiful stained glass windows during Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. Father Tony Arguelles road out the storm inside the Cathedral and provided testimony to Father Vic Messina. The wind-field suddenly blew-out one stained glass pane in the apex of the church that depicted St. Theresa of Lizoux, known as St. Theresa of the Child Jesus. At that moment, the pressure inside the Cathedral immediately diminished and the remaining windows stopped rumbling. The Church recognizes St. Theresa's death on Sept. 30, 1897 at the age of 24 and her vows of ministry in doing good on Earth.


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Pat Shingleton: "Looking Back Nine Years..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-looking-back-nine-years-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-looking-back-nine-years-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 12 Sep 2014 4:03:20 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

This morning's column looks back to 2005. Catholics recognized the birth of the Blessed Mother this past week. At Noon Mass on Sept. 7, 2005, Father Vic Messina incorporated his homily into the Hurricane Katrina's landfall. He referenced The Cathedral of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Biloxi and the foresight of its builders. It was erected 26 feet above sea-level at the city's highest point. During Katrina, Father Tony Arguelles remained inside and provided testimony to Father Vic that the popular stained glass windows were rattling, shaking and bending in 145 m.p.h. winds. Suddenly, the wind field blew out a pane depicting St. Theresa of the Child Jesus. Father Tony reported a distinct change in the Cathedral in tomorrow's column.


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Pat Shingleton: "No Beets, No Cola..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-no-beets-no-cola-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-no-beets-no-cola-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 11 Sep 2014 3:59:01 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

A refreshment expert recently suggested that climate change may be impacting popular refreshments. Extreme weather affects Coco-Cola's supply of sugar cane, sugar beets and citrus fruits. On a related note, Nike shuttered factories in Thailand due to flooding. The New York Times reports that Jeffrey Seabright, Vice-President for environment and water resources for Coke, referenced events related to climate change, including droughts and 100-year floods, every two years, that have retarded production of the company's goods. Experts believe that climate change will continue to threaten the global economy. Coca-Cola has embraced water-conservation technology and Nike uses a synthetic material that is less dependent on the weather.


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