WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2015, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Sat, 4 Jul 2015 22:07:08 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Independence..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-independence-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-independence-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 3 Jul 2015 6:58:50 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Buried in today's column are five nouns depicting events related to the Fourth of July. On July 4, 1856, E Meriam, writing for the New York Times, noted that over 67 consecutive years, rain had fallen on thirteen Independence Days. As noted in yesterday's column,  it was 102 degrees on July 4, 1860 and if Madison and Monroe had been in Charleston, South Carolina, they may have learned that eight people died of sunstroke, including two German Fusiliers. A tornado hit Washington, D.C. ripping off roofs for blocks on July 4, 1874. Thomas Jefferson once thought that smoke from fireworks and other explosives could activate rain. On July 4, 1806, an earthquake occurred in Schenectady, New York, along with the rumble of distant thunder. In years-gone-by, I remember the weather being just about perfect for the Fourth of July. There was always a large picnic in the backyard. Two or three wash tubs were stocked with drinks, kept cold from the blocks of ice from the local ice house. On the grill, foot-long hot dogs and burgers  were sizzlin' as relatives delivered their special recipes of potato salad, baked beans and casseroles. My grandfather made sure there was a chilled watermelon in the basement. After participating in a baseball game or marching in a local parade, the backyard was large enough for wiffle-ball games, volleyball or touch football. At dusk we'd walk a hundred yards and from Longview Drive on Wiley Hill in Ellwood City, Pennsylvania, we would look out over a valley as fireworks blasted skyward from the Conquenessing Country Club below. Other displays were viewed from the Blue Sky and Spotlight 88 Drive-In Theatres. The day ended with a trek to J and T Frozen Custard Stand. Our forecast for the Baton Rouge area changes after a two-day dry-out, showers pop this afternoon, expecting a wrap-up by early evening. Home delivery of Pat's column is available at: www.PatShingleton.com. 

 

 


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "The Day and the Weather" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-day-and-the-weather--74266/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-day-and-the-weather--74266/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 3 Jul 2015 3:27:52 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Weather expectations in Philadelphia for Independence Day include scattered showers, evening clearing and 78 degrees for the daytime-high. James Heintze researched historical weather conditions for the Fourth of July. He found that in New York City from 1789 to 1855 rain fell on thirteen July "Fourths." On July 4, 1860, eight members of the German Fusiliers donned full military dress and died from sunstroke in a Charleston, S.C. parade. On July 4, 1874 the New York Herald reported that "whole blocks of houses" in Washington, D.C., lost roofs when a tornado ripped through the city. In Boston on July 4, 1831, The National Intelligencer reported that, "The Northern Lights were beautifully vivid at the close of the 4th." The hottest Independence days include Palm Springs and Las Vegas. Schenectady, N.Y. reported an earthquake on July 4, 1806. Baton Rouge will place in the weather almanac a daytime high of 91, with returning afternoon showers. Showers should wrap-up by 8:00 PM, providing good viewing for the traditional "Fireworks on the Mississippi," an event that WBRZ has sponsored since its inception. My columns are archived at www.PatShingleton.com.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "The Saint Swithin Story..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-saint-swithin-story-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-saint-swithin-story-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 1 Jul 2015 6:25:54 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The Bishop of Winchester was a Benedictine monk who died on this date, July 2, 862. Prior to his death he firmly requested that his burial ceremony and his interment be outside the confines of his church. The good Bishop desired to have rain falling on his grave. His request was not advanced to those in charge of his funeral arrangements in the village of Winchester. When he died he was entombed on July 15th, inside the cathedral instead of outside the cathedral. Historical records note that immediately after his death, a lengthy drought began. Realizing that a mistake had occurred, the Bishop's body was exhumed and  re-buried in the Cathedral's grave-site. Once the services ended,  the drought ended and rain returned for 40 days. So here's the gist of this tradition that is more applicable for England:  If it rains on July 15, St. Swithin's Day, it will rain for 40 days or the actual saying: "St. Swithin's Day if it be fair, for 40 days 'twill rain nae mair." Noted Baton Rouge poet, Padraig Shingleton, recently recited. "St. Swithin was accurate across the pond, but it surely won't help our soggy lawns."  Pat's columns and related poems are available at www.PatShingleton.com.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Thunder and a Thunderous Speech" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-thunder-and-a-thunderous-speech--74157/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-thunder-and-a-thunderous-speech--74157/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 30 Jun 2015 5:55:35 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Goodbye June and hello July. Leading up to Independence Day, this Saturday, I will present some columns on events that occurred in Pennsylvania, 239 years ago. On July 1, 1776, the debate continued in Philadelphia concerning whether the 13 American colonies should declare their independence from Great Britain. John Dickinson appealed for loyalty to Britain. However, when John Adams began his oration a summertime thunderstorm erupted. He delivered a powerful speech in the midst of lightning and rolling thunder.Similar to our afternoon thunderstorms that darken our skies, at Independence Hall, candles were lit for the Continental Congress as Adams continued his passionate address that some believed was louder than the weather outside. The following day the momentous vote was taken during another thunderstorm. Two days later, a cold front slipped to the city and its passage ushered in cool air for Philadelphia and for the signing of the Declaration of Independence on the Fourth of July.  More July 4th stories tomorrow and all of my columns are available at www.PatShingleton.com.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "They're Out There..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-they-re-out-there-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-they-re-out-there-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 29 Jun 2015 7:00:30 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

I hosted a program on WBRZ in the late 80s, entitled, "Hotline After Dark." Our live broadcast showcased those within the community that shared interesting stories. One guest was a fireman from Zachary that retrieved a meteorite from his backyard. Numerous entities wanted it. The owner sold  chunks of the stone to museums and planetariums around the United States. On this date in 1908, passengers on the Trans-Siberian railroad witnessed a fireball as "bright-as-the-sun," streaking across the sky. The fireball exploded above the Tunguska River and leveled over a thousand square miles of forest. The fireball and its related blast was seen and heard for 1,000 miles. For many years, scientists, geologists, astronomers and astrophysicists studied the events and retrieved debris and determined that a chunk of asteroid vaporized in the lower atmosphere. Other related events include an asteroid on June 17, 2002 that was the size of a football field was traveling at 66,000 miles per hour that came within 75,000 miles from earth. It was only noticed and recorded by scientists as it zipped through space. As recent movies have portrayed, missiles will intercept future objects that may impact our planet. On June 30, 2014, an asteroid came within 4.6 million miles of Earth.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
"The First is Often the Worst" http://www.wbrz.com/news/the-first-is-often-the-worst-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/the-first-is-often-the-worst-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 25 Jun 2015 7:08:33 PM Pat Shingleton

From history books to stories that were passed down from parents and grandparents, some will remember June 27, 1957. Back then, access to radio and television were limited to a few stations in each market. Technology was limited in determining the strength of an approaching storm and on-shore instrumentation provided the only means of analyzing tropical systems. Satellite imagery was non-existent. Evacuation directives were not "part-of-the-plan" as residents rode-out land falling storms. This early season storm blasted the Louisiana-Texas border with a 12 foot storm surge. Extensive flooding and damage occurred in Cameron Parish and sections of Vermilion, Iberia and St. Mary Parishes with wind gusts of 180 miles per hour. With at least 500 deaths, Audrey set a record for the most storm deaths in the month of June. The storm is also noted as being the strongest storm to make landfall within the United States and one of only two major hurricanes to make landfall in the month of June. Another subtle reminder that it only takes one storm to jog memories-Katrina, Andrew, Gustav. Additional storm stories are available at www.PatShingleton.com.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
"An Interesting Date..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/an-interesting-date-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/an-interesting-date-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 24 Jun 2015 6:24:00 PM Pat Shingleton

For two days in a row, Tangipahoa Parish has been bopped with strong storms that ultimately made their way to Baton Rouge. In other severe weather episodes, tornadoes rarely hit mountainous areas but on June 25, 1960, a twister hit Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico, cutting a 100 yard path for two miles. Thirty-four injuries were reported with a destroyed chapel and camping equipment scattered for 14 miles. On June 26, 1969, lightning struck the Lanesboro State Fish Hatchery in Minnesota; 19,000 fish were fried. In Inverness, FL on June 25, '96, a bolt of lightning blasted a backyard clothes-line, sending the charge through a dog leash. Many will remember today's date as Hurricane Audrey gathered momentum in the northwest Gulf of Mexico in 1957.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
"Refreshing..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/refreshing-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/refreshing-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 23 Jun 2015 10:44:58 PM Pat Shingleton

Summer started Saturday and the stands are up. Whether they're snowball or ice cream, they provide lots of flavors and an occasional "ice-cream headache." I visited a lemonade stand in our neighborhood with proceeds assisting St. Jude Children's Research Center. When we were kids, lemons were expensive, so my mom, also known as "Grandma Shirley," stockpiled that fruity beverage that was invented by Edwin Perkins in 1927 called Kool-Aid, and a concentrate called Reamer's Lemon Blend. After a ballgame we'd bee-line it to the fridge, quaffing down these refreshing drinks. However, my mom also saved the water from boiled potatoes, to better activate the yeast for her homemade bread. Next to a pitcher of Kool-Aid was a "same-colored" quart of potato water. Even today, that refreshing flavor of potato water stays with me. Gallon for gallon, Kool Aid is the No.1 most consumed beverage for kids.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: Lightning alerts http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lightning-alerts/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lightning-alerts/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 22 Jun 2015 6:49:21 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Lightning alerts

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration designates June 22nd through the 28th as Lightning Safety Awareness Week. Lightning is the second leading atmospheric killer behind heat exhaustion. Additional factoids note that 82% of those killed are male and 70% of all lightning fatalities occur in June, July and August. Even though the diameter of a single bolt is the size of a quarter, it can increase the air temperature as much as 50,000 degrees, emitting 100 million volts. PVC piping has replaced traditional metal pipes, making homes more vulnerable to lightning hits and explosive fires. Interior piping in older homes formerly created a channel to advance lighting charges into the ground, thus the term "grounded."  Ben Franklin's invention, the lightning rod, provided a safe path, into the ground, for a deadly bolt. If you can hear thunder, lightning is close enough to strike and with nearly 25 million lightning strikes per year, 52 people are killed each year on average. It is not unusual for a lightning hit to occur 10 miles from the thunderstorm. Louisiana ranks second, behind Florida< for the number of lightning strikes.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "We'll Keep A Light On For you..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-we-ll-keep-a-light-on-for-you-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-we-ll-keep-a-light-on-for-you-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 17 Jun 2015 12:11:49 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Before electricity, the keeper of the lighthouse kept the lamps lit using kerosene. The lighthouseman donned a pair of colored goggles, preventing blurred vision from the ignition flash. From the coast of the Pacific Northwest to California, the Gulf of Mexico to the Atlantic seaboard; more than a thousand lighthouses guided the ships at sea away from coastal tragedy and brought many a captain through gales, tropical storms or fog. Today there is only one manned lighthouse remaining in New England. The other was kept for 65 years by Frank Schubert who manned the Coney Island Lighthouse. He and his dog, Blazer, remained on duty until December 11 of 2003. Schubert died at the age of 88 as the last of the Coast Guard's civilian lighthouse keepers.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "It's Seasonal..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-it-s-seasonal-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-it-s-seasonal-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 17 Jun 2015 12:07:03 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Springtime has been with us for 93 days and even though today is a season-shift, we've been experiencing summer for approximately a month. Today is the longest day of the year, marking the official start of the summer solstice. The sun is positioned at its furthest northern point; directly overhead at noon. Elsewhere, the warmest part of the day is after noon when the sun is highest in the sky. The heat kicks-in and increases due to the lag-time required for the ground and water to heat-up. North of the Arctic Circle there's continuous sunshine for 24 hours. Sunset in Barrow, Alaska won't occur until August 2. Along the U.S.-Canadian border the sun appears for 16.25 hours and 13.75 hours in Baton Rouge. And to all the Dad's a special salute to you on this Father's Day. During our church service's this morning a special blessing will be bestowed on Dad's living and deceased. I have been blessed with a tremendous father who bestowed upon me the importance of being a good father with hopes that Mike and Katie agree. Enjoy this day with your kids and grandkids. As mentioned previously, Pat's column is available at www.PatShingleton.com.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "More Pop in Your Pop..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-more-pop-in-your-pop-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-more-pop-in-your-pop-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 16 Jun 2015 11:56:19 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The sun is 868,000 miles across and is about 100 times the diameter of our planet. Without sunscreen, sun burn can be expected. During our younger years we realized the sun's power when we made our own root beer. Realizing that Coca-Cola originated in the "South" and Pepsi-Cola was replicated in the "North," folks here call it soda and we called it "Pop." A summertime treat for us was the process of making our own "Pop." We would retrieve a mixing crock from the basement and Mom would mix a root beer extract that included sugar and yeast. After cleaning Pepsi, Frosty Root Beer and 7-Up pop bottles, we'd funnel-in the root beer and manually cap them with a bottle capper. The process then involved placing the bottles in the sunlight and regularly spinning them to eliminate the sediment. The bottle spinning also continued to dissolve any ingredients.  It took four days to get the effervescence just-right. However,  before the fourth day, a summertime evening would be interrupted from what sounded like a firecracker. After a hot day and a cooler night, some of the bottles would explode. The power of sunlight, the power of the yeast and a rapid cooling process gave us an extra pop in our soda-pop.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Getting Undercover" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-getting-undercover-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-getting-undercover-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 16 Jun 2015 11:23:57 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The sound of thunder in South Louisiana sends us quickly inside or under-cover. An example of avoiding inclement weather in years-gone-by was the covered bridge. A few years ago my Mom forwarded a copy of the Ellwood City Area Historical Society Newsletter. The issue detailed the first covered bridge connecting Hazel Dell and Ellwood City. The bridge length was 165 feet with a width of twelve feet, eight inches. The width was calculated to accommodate the exact width of buggies and horse-drawn wagons. These bridges were also constructed to provide shelter for travelers during inclement weather that included strong and severe thunderstorms and unexpected snow storms. This particular issue of the Newsletter also included an excerpt on the use of the "spring house." These structures were built adjacent to a well for fresh, spring water. They were cool enough to preserve milk and meat from spoilage during the summer months. All of my columns can be retrieved at www.patshingleton.com.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "A Split Moon and Flooding Rain" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-split-moon-and-flooding-rain-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-split-moon-and-flooding-rain-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 16 Jun 2015 11:15:51 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On this date in 1178, five monks in Canterbury, England, witnessed an astronomical event on the Sunday before the feast of St. John the Baptist. Historian Juanita Rose Violini, reported that their diaries note "an east-facing crescent moon" split in two. In addition to the "split," a blaze of hot coals and fire surrounded the moon. They also noted that the moon began to "throb like a wounded snake," and the scenario repeated a dozen times. This event was documented by the famous medieval chronicler, Gervase of Canterbury. Space scientist Dr. Jack Hartung of the State University of New York, reviewed the testimony 800 years later. He calculated the impact point and size of the moon crater, believing it was caused by a nine mile wide meteor.Another note of interest, for many years, Baton Rouge has certainly experienced its share of flooding rain. Torrential rains on this date in 1815, created so much mud at Waterloo, that Napoleon delayed his attack on the British for six hours. It gave the British, with the help of Prussian reinforcements, the assistance they needed to defeat the French. During the retreat from Gettysburg, Pa, during the Civil War, storm-swollen streams stopped the pursuit of Confederate troops. In 1856, lightning struck St. Jean Church on the Mediterranean island of Rhodes. Exploding gunpowder, stored in the basement, killed more than 4,000 villagers. On May 6, 1937, the dirigible Hindenburg burst into flames over Lakehurst, NJ; due to electrical flickering from a thundercloud, igniting a mixture of air and hydrogen. My column is available on your desk top at www.patshingleton.com.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Inland Storms and Better Homes" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-inland-storms-and-better-homes-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-inland-storms-and-better-homes-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 16 Jun 2015 11:11:20 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Weatherwise magazine identified land-falling hurricanes that created severe inland impacts.  These storms actually created the most damage after the post-tropical phases of the storm. Four storms tore up the Carolinas including: Hazel in October of 1954, Floyd in 1999, Gaston in 2004 and Irene in 2011. All of these systems caused river flooding, flash flooding and damaging winds. Agnes and Eloise in 1975 and 1972 were the worst for Florida with Sandy not only creating high winds and river flooding in New Jersey but heavy snow. New England and Nova Scotia endured the effects of Arthur in July of 2014. Camille is the only system that met this category for Louisiana and Mississippi in August of 1969 with a combination of flash and river flooding, mudslides and debris flows. On a related note, the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety (IBHS) continues to assist homeowners in preparing for possible hurricanes.  "FORTIFIED Home" began three years ago and is designed to not only build safer homes but retrofit existing structures. During the pilot phase of the project tests replicated high wind and hail. Builders and contractors work with home buyers and homeowners to chose the desired level of protection that best suits individual budgets and resilience goals. The "Hurricane Program" of the plan offers a superior set of standards to improve structure resilience. Experts believe the hurricane division will reduce the potential for property damage, protect physical assets, lower costs and quickly return owners after the storm. Home delivery onf the Official Pat Shingleton Weather News is available at www.PatShingleton.com.

 


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "El Nino-Limiting Growth" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-el-nino-limiting-growth-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-el-nino-limiting-growth-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 15 Jun 2015 6:32:10 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The broad area of low pressure east of the Texas coast should become the second named storm of the season. Early analysis suggests that the Tropical Depression or Tropical Storm Bill, will be a rain maker from Texas to Missouri. For years the El Nino/La Nina experiments have determined the length and strength of a designated hurricane season. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University believe that El Nino may have dramatic impacts on childhood growth in affected areas. The scientists selected 2,095 children from a cluster of rural villages in Tumbes, Peru, that were born between 1991 and 2001.Weatherwise Magazine reports that those born before and after the 1997-1998 El Nino are smaller for their age than those born before the event. The '97-'98 El Nino was the most severe episode on record and in this section of Peru, damaged bridges and roads isolated numerous rural villages.  These destructive storms prevented access to food, clean water and health-care. Destroyed crops and livestock limited food reserves and episodes of diarrhea increased due to warmer weather and wetter conditions. The researchers contend that limited access to nutrition and resources stunted growth and caused the "shorter-than-stature" development for the region's children. With the frequency of El Nino expected to increase with climate change, this study could assist in identifying future episodes. All of my columns are delivered to you via www.PatShingleton.com.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Flyin' High..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-flyin-high-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-flyin-high-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 12 Jun 2015 6:38:07 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Hopefully you're "flyin' the flag" today. Our own "giant American flag" is at Robinson Brother's at Airline and Sherwood. Before Chip Robinson, his Dad, Mackey, began this honored tradition of recognizing Old Glory not only on Flag Day but every day. Whether it's a gentle breeze, or a hefty gust, the Robertson Brother's flag is a tremendous tribute. As noted, today is Flag Day, originating in 1885 when B.J. Cigrand, encouraged his students in Fredonia, N.Y., to proudly display the flag of the United States of America. Today also commemorates the official anniversary of the adoption of the Stars and Stripes at the Betsy Ross House on June 14, 1891. At our home, the flag has been especially flown since September 11, 2001 and is displayed from sunrise to sunset, illuminated at night. It shouldn't be flown in rain or inclement weather; is raised briskly and lowered slowly at sunset.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "A Zapped Turkey!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-zapped-turkey-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-zapped-turkey-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 12 Jun 2015 6:30:10 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

As I have referenced in previous columns, Louisiana ranks second to the number of lightning hits on a yearly basis with Florida leading the list. The Old Farmer's Almanac-Acts of God offered an excerpt from one of Benjamin Franklin's journals. As you know, Franklin was recognized not only as a famed statesman and inventor but also as one of the first to administer resuscitation. A journal entry noted, "A pullet (turkey) was struck dead by the lightning shock directed through its head." Franklin furthered in his entry that he attempted to revive the turkey by repeatedly "blowing into its lungs." His attempts with this procedure met with success and apparently the bird recovered. However, once it was "set down", the confused and delirious turkey ran headlong against a wall. Historians believe this was one of the first cases of artificial respiration being used as a treatment of electric shock. With additional thundershowers this weekend, remember the rule from Uncle Pat, when you hear the thunder, head indoors. Another alert, this column is home delivered at www.PatShingleton.com.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Screening a Movie!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-screening-a-movie-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-screening-a-movie-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 11 Jun 2015 6:51:52 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Continuing our column from Thursday and if you don't have home delivery of "Pat's Official Weather News," it's available at www.PatShingleton.com.  As reported yesterday, packing the family into the car and heading to a movie is a familiar event. Kids today are unaware of "outdoor" theaters - also known as the "Drive-In..." Recognizing that I am an official member of the WBRZ Investigation Team, I investigated 6 states that have "Drive-In" theaters. California leads the list with 36 outdoor screens with Pennsylvania offering 27. Washington, Michigan and Virginia offer seven with nine remaining in Florida. Thursday marked the anniversary of the first drive-in theater, constructed in Camden, N.J. in 1937. In the 50s, our parents would pack us into the Ford station wagon and head to our local Drive-In Theater, Spotlight 88, located between New Brighton and Ellwood City, PA. Funds were limited when it came to the concession stand so  two shopping bags of buttered popcorn and thermoses of Kool-Aid were also transported. The feature on this particular evening starred Johnny Weismuller in one of his Tarzan flicks. During the trip we experienced periods of showers and upon our arrival, the rain was heavier leading to  a tremendous thunderstorm. Audio for the movie was provided from a box-speaker lifted from a carriage-type pole and attached to the car window. "Drive-Ins," operating today, transmit the movie-audio via a pre-set radio frequency. On this occasion, static erupted from the window speaker as the thunderstorm increased. Expecting only a temporary shower, we watched the movie and a brilliant lightning show. Just as Tarzan was swinging through the jungle, with Chita at his side, it happened.  At the height of this thunderstorm, we watched and listened with wipers swishing and static audio. Suddenly, Tarzan swung through the jungle and off the screen! Our popcorn was over and so was this flick. The crashing thunder was mixed with an omploding wall as the strong storm toppled the huge screen! We wondered if Tarzan and Chita survived the storm and Dad was more concerned about our survival. He peeled out of the lot in the midst of lightning and rain, making it home safely. The next morning, my brother Denis, discovered the audio speaker still attached to the window of the station wagon.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Outdoor Movies..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-outdoor-movies-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-outdoor-movies-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 10 Jun 2015 6:46:03 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Packing the family in the car and heading to a movie is a familiar event. Kids today are unaware of  "outdoor" theaters - also known as the "Drive-In..." Recognizing that I am an official member of the WBRZ Investigation Team, I investigated 6 states that have "Drive-In" theaters. California leads the list with 36 outdoor screens with Pennsylvania offering 27. Washington, Michigan and Virginia offer seven with nine remaining in Florida. Today marks the anniversary of the first drive-in theater, constructed in Camden, N.J. in 1937. In the 50s,  our parents would pack us into the Ford station wagon and head to Spotlight 88 with two shopping bags of buttered popcorn and thermoses of Kool-Aid. The feature that night starred Johnny Weismuller in one of his Tarzan flicks. Off and on showers occurred and upon our arrival, the rain was heavier, temporarily diminished, and erupted into a tremendous thunderstorm. Audio for the movie was provided from a box-speaker lifted from a carriage-type pole. On this occasion,  static erupted from the window speaker as the thunderstorm increased. Expecting only a temporary shower, we watched the movie and a brilliant lightning show. Just as Tarzan was swinging through the jungle, with Chita at his side, it happened. The rest of the story Thursday in Pat's column that is also available for home delivery at www.patshingleton.com.


Permalink| Comments


]]>