WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2017, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Sat, 21 Oct 2017 HH:10:ss GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Lewis and Clark and Weather..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lewis-and-clark-and-weather-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lewis-and-clark-and-weather-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 19 Oct 2017 10:13:08 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

When Meriwether Lewis and William Clark began their expedition of discovery to the Pacific Ocean, President Jefferson made sure they were well supplied.  Along with the best Kentucky rifles, powder horns and lead shot, their supplies included portable soup, fish hooks, mosquito netting, flints, the finest instruments of navigation, a microscope, and cloth for trading.  Lewis and Clark’s journals noted a variety of flora and fauna unknown to science at that time. As noted in a previous article, they also transported three thermometers into a portion of America where meteorological observations had never been reported.  Their notations included the number of rainy, cloudy and clear days along with lightning, snow, hail, ice, seasonal prevailing winds and plants and animals reactions to the elements.


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Pat Shingleton: "Wilma and Earthquakes..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wilma-and-earthquakes-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wilma-and-earthquakes-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 18 Oct 2017 10:29:53 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Weather anniversaries for October 19 include Hurricane Wilma that blasted the Yucatan Peninsula with 175 mile-per-hour winds in 2005. With Katrina and Rita, Wilma not only became one of the five most intense Atlantic hurricanes but rewrote the record book in other categories. Wilma's eye wall was just two nautical miles wide, becoming the smallest eye on record. Louisiana has also experienced episodes of earthquakes.  On this date in 1930 one rattled Napoleonville with effects reported in Allemands, Donaldsonville, Franklin, Morgan City and White Castle.  Residents reported overturned objects, shaken trees and cracked plaster. Other area quakes include a magnitude 3.8 reading near Greenville, MS on June 4, 1967. On November 19, 1958, one shook houses and rattled windows in Baton Rouge.


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Pat Shingleton: "Fronts and Nature's Directors..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-fronts-and-nature-s-directors-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-fronts-and-nature-s-directors-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 17 Oct 2017 10:22:35 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:


We've entered the season of more frontal passages. Next week's front will slide more cool air our way.  In addition to warm, stationary and occluded fronts, have you ever heard of an upper front? They're frontal boundaries in the upper atmosphere that don't extend to the ground. "Anafronts" occur when warm fronts advance into the high altitudes and "karafronts" descend as cold fronts from high altitudes. Another group of fronts exist near the equator, separating air masses in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere know was "Intertropical fronts." In south Louisiana, we're accustomed to fronts that travel from west to east. Another strange type of front is called a "backdoor cold front." These systems originate in the northwest Atlantic Ocean and move onto the Northeast coast. These fronts are associated with high-pressure systems spinning clockwise off the coast, pushing cooler marine air toward the land. During our excursions in the woods on Wiley Hill, in Ellwood City, PA., Scout Master Art Johnson taught us that nature provided direction finders. One indicator was moss covering the north side of trees and rocks, wind direction and locating the north star. "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences" reported that herds of grazing and resting deer and cattle align themselves with Earth's magnetic field. Researchers observed 3,000 deer in the Czech Republic noting that regardless of wind or sunlight, they generally aligned to the magnetic north. They believe creatures can sense Earth's magnetic field as field detection is a fundamental role in spatial perception. Even if creatures move over short distances, magnetism assisted their navigation.


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Pat Shingleton: "The First Predictions and Pig Weed..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-first-predictions-and-pig-weed-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-first-predictions-and-pig-weed-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 16 Oct 2017 10:05:38 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:
During idle time as an ambulance driver in World War I, Lewis Richardson would perform numerical weather experiments; cataloging sky conditions, integrating numerical calculations into his journal. His calculations by hand didn't produce a useful forecast but was the beginning of modern weather predictions.  He wrote a manuscript that was lost but eventually discovered in a coal bin and later published.  Upon his death, the book was given to the National Weather Service where it is on display in their Executive Suite. He envisioned a "large hall-like theater" filled with human computers, calculating for a particular point on the Earth. The National Weather Service currently utilizes massive parallel computers executing those same calculations. Finally, it's harvest time in South Louisiana for sugar cane and soy beans. Each year, farmers in Arkansas are struggling with a menacing weed that is compromising the cotton crop. "Pig Weed" is dominating many fields and pesticide applications that originally controlled the weed remain ineffective. Years ago, experts  declared it uncontrollable as it chokes a million acres of cotton and soybeans. Some farmers have spent more than $500,000 fighting a plant that won't die. Pig weed grows three inches per day and has a root structure the size of a baseball bat at its base. It not only kills crops but destroys the blades on combines and cotton pickers. By next year, researchers will be able to deliver a herbicide to control pig weed.

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Pat Shingleton: "Under Pressure and Stinky Cheese..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-under-pressure-and-stinky-cheese-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-under-pressure-and-stinky-cheese-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 12 Oct 2017 9:57:48 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Atmospheric pressure is the force exerted on the surface from the weight of air above the surface. We wouldn't know this if it weren't for events that took place at the Puy de Dome Observatory in Central France. The atmosphere is a fluid layer of gases, surrounding the earth with a total weight of 5,600 trillion tons. At sea level, a vertical column of air one inch square, rising to the atmosphere weighs 14.7 pounds. French scientist and philosopher, Blaise Pascal didn't know this in 1648 when he instructed his brother-in-law to carry a barometer from the base of the Puy de Dome, 1465 meters to its summit which resulted in a fall of three inches of mercury. This established the rate of variation of the Earth's atmospheric pressure due to altitude. Two-hundred years later the Puy de Dome Observatory became the first permanent mountain observatory in Europe. in closing...Tuesday's frontal passage, may find your nose collecting a whiff from the paper plants northwest of Baton Rouge. Bad odors are often one of the more evident aspects of air pollution. Even small concentrations of odors can be easily detected. When 50% of the population can detect an odor, it's called the olfactory threshold and can be as small as one part per million, billion, or trillion, depending on the chemical species. In Madison, Wisconsin, on May 3, 1991, strong winds fanned a fire at the Central Storage and Warehouse. This building housed large quantities of cheese and meat products. The blaze erupted into a giant grease fire and despite a driving rainstorm, the inferno burned for three days. The following days included record-hot weather that enhanced quick rotting of the food residue. Residents held their noses as hardware stores sold out of clothes-pins.


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Pat Shingleton: "Foooog in Trepassey..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-foooog-in-trepassey-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-foooog-in-trepassey-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 11 Oct 2017 9:47:19 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:


Monday morning our overnight low was recorded at 74 degrees, this tied the record low for the warmest morning dating back to 1966. Tuesday morning's 75 degree reading once again tied the warmest record low for the date going back to 1941 with 60 degrees Wednesday morning, three clicks off the record in 1914. This morning we'll begin with a 67 "more comfortable" 67 degree overnight low. Next Tuesday we should enjoy cooler mornings and a taste of October. In addition to cooler weather we also advance into "fog season." There’s a small fishing village in Newfoundland that is recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as the foggiest place in the world.  Trepassey, located on the Avalon Peninsula, averages 160 days of fog per year.  In addition, Newfoundland’s provincial capital, St. John, north of Trepassey, experiences 124 days of fog per year, giving it the distinction as the foggiest major city in Canada.  St. John is also recognized as the rainiest urban location with 60 inches or five feet of rain each year.  Hold on, there are a few more distinctions for this town. It’s also the snowiest with 1414.34 inches; the windiest with a daily average of 15 mph; the cloudiest with only 1,497 hours of sunshine and having the greatest number of days of freezing rain per year at 38.


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Pat Shingleton: "Octoberfest, Wurstfest..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-octoberfest-wurstfest-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-octoberfest-wurstfest-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 10 Oct 2017 10:28:08 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Yesterday Brittany Weiss reminded me that it was time for us to organize our traditional "Shingleton Octoberfest Extravaganza..."  This is held at the end of October at our home that includes pumpkin carving, taste testing and great German Food.  On October, 12 1810, citizens of Munich, Germany were invited to attend the reception of King Ludwig I to Princess Therese of Saxony. The wedding and reception was held at the front of the city gates and for 175 years Oktoberfest has become a sixteen-day festival that showcases the harvest. For 16 years, Richard and Brenda Netzberger presented a marvelous Oktoberfest for Baton Rouge. Their event maintained the tradition of the harvest with Wurstel or sausage, Brezel or pretzels, Reiberdatschict or potato pancakes and Blaukraut or red cabbage.  Richard and Brenda devoted their energies to this event truly for the delight of others. Due to their respective business commitments, Oktoberfest for us will be fond memories. We had the pleasure of attending another festival in New Brunfels, Texas, called "Wurstfest."


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Pat Shingleton: "Fall Foilage and the Cranberry..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-fall-foilage-and-the-cranberry-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-fall-foilage-and-the-cranberry-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 9 Oct 2017 10:13:04 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Fall foliage in New England is called second to none and Southern New England attracts a vast amount of leaf-peepers. This area is composed of three small states: Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts.  Rhode Island is the smallest, measuring about 30 miles across with Connecticut the third smallest. Weatherwise Magazine reports that balanced precipitation and consistent seasonal temperature variations support both agriculture and industry. The availability of year-long precipitation and melting snows allow for plentiful vegetative growth. In addition to the luxurious fall foliage, harvest-time also includes a large portion of the nation’s cranberry crop and apple harvest ranks high in the nation’s cash receipts per acre.  Should your travels take you to New England before the end of the month the peak period for leaf-changing displays are underway.


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Pat Shingleton: "Pig Weed and Mrs. O'Leary..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-pig-weed-and-mrs-o-leary-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-pig-weed-and-mrs-o-leary-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 6 Oct 2017 10:31:54 PM Pat Shingelton: Pat Shingleton:

We’re getting closer to harvest time in South Louisiana including sugar cane and soy beans.  Farmers in Arkansas continually struggle with a menacing weed that is compromising the cotton crop and its called...  “Pig Weed.”   Pesticides that originally controlled the weed are no longer effective. Experts declare it uncontrollable as it chokes more than a million acres of cotton and soybeans.  Some farmers have spent more than $500,000 fighting a plant that won’t die.  Pig weed grows three inches a day and is as big as a baseball bat at its base.  It not only kills crops but destroys the blades on combines and cotton pickers. A new, engineered herbicide has been introduced. In closing, Professor Increase A. Lapham was instrumental in creating the national weather service in 1870.  As an assistant to the chief signal officer under the U.S. Army Signal Service, Lapham chronicled an extremely dry weather pattern in Chicago. He noted, “Unusual dryness has pervaded the atmosphere during the past two months; …rainfall has been less than the average and evaporation considerably more.  Very little rain has fallen upon the extended region since August.” Due to these conditions a great fire started on this date at 9:30 p.m. in or near a barn behind the home of Patrick and Catherine O’Leary at 137 DeKoven Street in southwest Chicago.  Legend suggests it was Mrs. O’Leary’s cow that caused the inferno when it kicked over a lantern; proven to be a fabrication.


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Pat Shingleton: "food Canteens and the Environment..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-food-canteens-and-the-environment-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-food-canteens-and-the-environment-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 5 Oct 2017 10:30:32 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Mobile food canteens have become popular in the Baton Rouge area and have caused problems in China. Smoke from the barbecue stands are a common source of unhealthy airborne particulate matter known as PM2.5. A spokesman from Beijing's Bureau of City Administration and Law Enforcement insists the "stands" not only create serious air pollution but enhance noise pollution for neighborhoods. Unlicensed grill operators were facing fines of up to 5,000 yuan or about $815 and the confiscation of their grilling equipment for discharging smoke and noise. China's microblogging service, Sina Weibo, believes the crackdown was the government's attempt to harass and limit vendors. The most smoke is caused by specific trucks that serve mutton skewers. Yum!


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Pat Shingleton: "Saxby's Gale..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-saxby-s-gale-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-saxby-s-gale-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 3 Oct 2017 10:32:07 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Whether it’s the stock market or weather, predictions are made every day based upon data and trends. In 1868, a prediction for severe storms was made on a specific day, ten months in advance. It was Christmas Day, 1868 and British naval engineer Stephen Martin Saxby made this astounding prediction. Through the London newspaper, The Standard, he believed an "atmospheric disturbance" would occur on the following October 5. On October 4, 1869 in the northeastern United States and Canadian Maritime Provinces a gale claimed 100 lives, destroyed homes and grounded ships. It became known as "Saxby's Gale." Saxby's prediction was based on the position of the moon relative to the Earth. This scenario repeated itself during Hurricane Lili in October, 2002.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Harvest and Indian Summer..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-harvest-and-indian-summer-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-harvest-and-indian-summer-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 29 Sep 2017 9:56:08 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The apple harvest is underway in northern orchards. Our backyard contained trees with adjacent lots providing a good crop for everyone.  The harvest provided my Mom with enough produce to “put up” apple sauce, apple butter and freezer apples for pies and cobblers.  To compliment refrigeration, a basement or spring house provided a “climate controlled” environment for turnips, potatoes, carrots, peaches and apples.  Another location was an abandoned well. Our Dad and Grandfather devised a means of “basketing” apples, attached to a rope and lowered into the well; above the water line. An apple urge sent my Dad outdoors on a cold winter night.  Attempting to retrieve the crisp treat he felt less rope tension and heard the splash. Cold weather above the 14 inch freeze-line snapped the line. In closing... This item has been mentioned in other articles with somewhat of an update.  Indian summer occurs in mid to late autumn, usually after the first killing frost.  It’s difficult to experience this in our sub-tropical, south Louisiana climate but is greatly appreciated through other sections of the country.  Its usage has been traced to 1778 as Native Americans utilized these days to increase their winter food stores.  In Europe a similar weather pattern has been called Old Wives’ summer, Halcyon days, and St. Martin’s summer. In previous columns, I referenced Indian summer on one of our broadcasts and received an e-mail from Marsha Reichle.  She wrote, “Dear Pat:  It’s called Indian summer when we have Apache fog.”


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Pat Shingleton: "Gramps Whittling with his Barlow..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gramps-whittling-with-his-barlow-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gramps-whittling-with-his-barlow-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 28 Sep 2017 10:27:17 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

George Washington carried one and Mark Twain wrote of a “real Barlow” in “Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn” in 1876.  A Barlow is classified as a penknife however original penknives didn’t have folding blades; resembling a scalpel and designed to thin and point writing instruments known as quills. Both knives were used for whittling which is an exercise in cutting small bits or pare shavings from a piece of wood. No matter what the season, Bert Price, our grandfather, not only carried a Barlow but also whittled. When we would ask “Gramps” to borrow his Barlow he would fold his newspaper, spit some tobacco juice and retrieve his precious knife from his overalls, saying, “Now mind, that Barlow is sharp and cuts two inches ahead of its shadow.”


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Pat Shingleton: "The Wind Rose" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-wind-rose--101065/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-wind-rose--101065/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 27 Sep 2017 10:23:56 PM Pat Shingelton: Pat Shingleton:
Without charts, the only means to determine a sailor or explorer's location was celestial navigation. The captain's chart was little more than the ship's log. On old maps, a circular directional emblem is a "wind rose." Mariner's in Homer's time identified direction with wind and early cartographers were part artist, part astronomer, combining wind direction into the "wind rose." Once nautical charts were initiated in the fourteenth century, the four primary winds were schematically positioned around a circle that represented the horizon. Always present was the "wind-rose" that contained a radial set of points, such as a star, directed into each wind position. The rhumb lines radiated from the central point of the rose, connected to each directional point. In the sixteenth century, cartographers expressed their most imaginative work within the rose, incorporating brilliant colors with gold and silver laced trims. Possibly through some means of uniformity, principal winds, half-winds, and quarter winds were done in different colors.  Fifteenth century Italian cartographers used gold, green and red hues for their winds.  Cherubs were added; blowing the principal winds from their mouths and sometimes accompanied by wild animals.  At the mercy of the wind, mariners used this circular, directional emblem for several hundred years.  Early Italian wind roses indicated an east wind with an "L" for "levanter" with the west wind designated as a setting sun.  A wind such as the "grecco" or northeast wind was marked with a "G". An "S" marked a "sirocco" or southeast wind and the symbol for a northwest wind or "maestro" carried an "M". The north wind originally was noted with a variety of symbols depicting celestial stars. In the 1500s, north was often marked with a symbol familiar to us, the fleur-de-lis. The discovery of the lodestone or magnetite, once touched to a steel needle, began the development of the compass.Where the compass and GPS sets our course today, the wind rose was the primitive directional indicator on navigational charts.

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Pat Shingleton: "An Anniversary Storm..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-anniversary-storm-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-anniversary-storm-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 26 Sep 2017 10:31:07 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

As Maria skirts north of Bermuda, it reminded me of another familiar storm.  On September 26, 1987, I was in Bermuda, accompanying my wife on an advertising conference.   Three members of our family made the trip, including our “soon-to-be-born-by-four-months” daughter, Katie.  Also visiting Bermuda during this trip was a tropical storm bearing the name of Emily.  There are plenty of Emilys in my wife’s family.  Her mother was Emily Lou, her sister is Emily and our niece and Godmother of our son Michael is Emily.  There are many chapters in the family registry about “our” Emilys. Tropical Storm Emily hit Bermuda with 85 mile-per-hour winds.  As all weathermen would do, I watched the storm from a pub in the hotel, enjoying a couple of pints while my wife was secure in an interior room. Golf the following day at a course next to our hotel was tricky with trees and debris.


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Pat Shingleton: "The White Wind and Signs of Fall" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-white-wind-and-signs-of-fall-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-white-wind-and-signs-of-fall-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 25 Sep 2017 9:45:02 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The world’s highest peak, outside of Asia’s Himalayas, is Aconcagua, located 100 miles east of the Pacific Ocean in Argentina.  In the crown of South America’s Andes mountain range it rises 23,000 feet above the Pacific’s shores and the cloud cover at the summit is so frequent that it has been referred to as the Viento Blanco or White Wind.  Mountain climbers traditionally describe each notable location by their strong environmental conditions and the characteristics of Aconcagua are its extreme wind.  Pacific storms crash on the natural walls of the Andes.  Westward pushing air rises above the peaks of the range to Aconcagua where it becomes White Wind.  Condensation surrounding the white clouds turns these clouds to a Dantean orange at sunset. Finally, in previous years, there seemed to be more evidence of autumn. Years ago, I ventured through the neighborhood noticing a fig tree on one street completely clean, suggesting the birds were storing energy for winter. In subsequent years, the same tree displayed maximum fruit. About three years ago,  our street-lined oak trees, were loaded with acorns, even more were on the ground as the squirrel storage process was underway. In addition it appears that fewer woolly worms were noticeable.  In my younger years, butternut trees were ready for collection in mid-September.  We’d collect the nuts with gloves and store them in the basement. They were excellent in Mom’s Christmas cookies.  Why the gloves? The residue from the butternuts left a stain that was hard to remove.


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Pat Shingleton: "Code Words and Sprites..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-code-words-and-sprites-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-code-words-and-sprites-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:25:40 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Years ago, I visited with Anne Jones.  Their plantation, Blairstown, has been in the family for years, once thriving with row crops and livestock and is still productive today with timber. Our conversation switched from my reason for the call to the use of code words. Today we use codes such as time codes to determine a video scene or the codes used by law enforcement to designate traffic accidents and officer’s locations and destinations.  Back then, Ann and her relatives used the words “Pat Shingleton” as a code. When their brother Tom Jones, who performed a great impersonation of the famous singer, reminds them to monitor the weather, they would hear Tom rant for so long that they look at one another, shield their mouths and say “Pat Shingleton!”   I would call Ann and leave a message as she was assured it was a prank from one of her friends in the use of the “code word.” In closing, sprites are blobs of light above a thunderstorm and can be 100 miles wide and often extend 60 miles into the ionosphere. Since 1886, scientific literature referenced sprites even though it was impossible to capture a picture of one. During a thunderstorm in Minnesota in July, 1989, two University of Minnesota scientists accidentally captured a sprite while conducting a test for a rocket flight. On July 7, 1993, in the High Plains during a series of thunderstorms, 240 sprites were recorded. Scientists from the University of Alaska captured numerous sprites from a high-flying NASA aircraft. Since then, more than 10,000 sprites have been monitored from Colorado’s Yucca Ridge Field Station from low-light television tests.


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Pat Shingleton: "It's Autumn and A Big Sink..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-it-s-autumn-and-a-big-sink-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-it-s-autumn-and-a-big-sink-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 21 Sep 2017 10:28:52 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

This afternoon at 3:02, the Sun will cross the equator initiating the autumnal equinox. Before the designation of seasons some cultures recognized the seasons as either rainy or dry. Others have recognized three seasons: growing, harvesting and winter, while others have marked ten or more seasons. The designation of four seasons has a beginning and end point. They are defined when the Earth moves around the Sun. The word equinox comes from the Latin for "equal night." This isn't the case at the exact moment of the autumnal equinox for two reasons: Sunrise and sunset occurs when the Sun's top edge crosses the horizon.  Earth's atmosphere changes the Sun's apparent position when the Sun is lowThe Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth reports that the North American continent is kept afloat by heat that makes rocks buoyant.  Comparing the continent to a rock, one theory depicts that if the temperature of the continent cooled to 750 degrees, it would sink. That is the temperature of some of the coldest crust rock in North America and researchers believe that this cooling would sink New York into the Atlantic by 1,427 feet.  Los Angeles would dip 3,756 feet under the Pacific and Denver, would be 727 feet under water. The immediate benefit is this cooling process would take billions of years. Seattle will actually rise because it is positioned on a cold rock slab.


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Pat Shingleton: "Twisters and Grapes..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-twisters-and-grapes-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-twisters-and-grapes-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 20 Sep 2017 10:29:10 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

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Pat Shingleton: "Coffee Complications..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-coffee-complications-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-coffee-complications-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 19 Sep 2017 10:27:49 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

We expect and will embrace the seasonal change and especially the fronts that clear out the clouds and usher in cooler, breezy weather. Years ago, I was enjoying lunch with a coffee expert, the late Norman Saurage of Community Coffee. From Norman’s many years of experience, he knew whether our cups of coffee were brewed properly and if it was fresh, stale or slightly stale.  In addition, years ago, The New York Times reported that coffee production was at threat from global warming. British agricultural specialists analyzed growing trends and the environment and determined that climate change is harming crops across Central and South America.  The high-end specialty coffee, Arabica, which is more popular and more expensive than Robusta, could become nonexistent. Scientists believe it is premature to identify weather patterns that are directly related to warming. Cenicafe, the national coffee research center, are working with genecists to develop coffee plants more resistant to heavy rains and heat.


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