WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2015, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Sun, 26 Apr 2015 01:04:01 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Rock Alum...." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rock-alum-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rock-alum-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 24 Apr 2015 9:33:35 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Baseball today at "The Box" is currently under an obvious rain delay! Pre-dawn sprinkles advanced to stronger showers and thunderstorms, wrapping up tonight.  I forwarded a column that detailed how many athletes use baby powder to remain cool during athletic competitions.With that noted, Alum contains aluminum sulfate and is found in styptic pencils and as astringents.  Alum is used as a skin soothing agent. My mother had a "medicine drawer" containing every medicinal substance invented from the 1900s to the present, especially Rollie salve, which will be discussed in a future column. Years ago Andy Ezell and I walked 36 holes at the Delmar and Stonecrest courses in Western Pennsylvania. A buildup of sweat and moisture, "in the lower torso," causes one to become "galded" - diagnosed as a "sore rash." Mom told us before we went to play to place a clump of alum in our pant pocket to prevent the rash. We didn't and we were sore.Due to the use of alum in the construction of illegal drugs, the substance is hard to acquire for purposeful mediations an applications. However,  to this day, Stan Harris, President of the Louisiana Restaurant Association and Bob Gelbach always carry rock alum.

 


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Pat Shingleton: "Playin' in the Dirt" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-playin-in-the-dirt-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-playin-in-the-dirt-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 23 Apr 2015 5:00:58 PM Pat Shingleton:

Whether its flowers, fruits or vegetables we are fortunate in South Louisiana to enjoy our gardens year-round. I prefer "pot" gardening or should I clarify,  "container" gardening. Years ago, vegetable gardening wasn't a hobby it was an assignment. Fruits and vegetables planted, hoed, cultivated and harvested were consumed during the cold months. Occasionally, "Pap Price" would sow rye grass into the garden to increase soil nutrients. It seems that after you've done gardening as a kid it sticks and today, the task is a hobby enjoyed by me and my brother Kevin. Our recent stretch of nine days of rain totaling ten inches prevented Kevin from preparing his garden while my containers have held the tomato plants for almost a month. My friend and Master Gardiner, Camm Morton, planted his tomatoes in February and shared with me his "Better Boy" results. Kevin cranks-up his "roto-tiller" to prepare the garden and if it's on the "fritz," he "puts in the garden," as our grandfather would call it, the old way. The actual preparation in Western Pennsylvania begins in February with what were called old storm windows. The elevated windows were placed over the seedlings and even though there was snow on the ground the window acted like a mini greenhouse. Kevin has "spaded the garden" just as Grandpap Price did when we were kids. With a wad of Red Man in his cheek, he stands back to admire this work. He also visits his chiropractor the day after.


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Pat Shingleton: "Leaves, Insects and Wildflowers" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-leaves-insects-and-wildflowers-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-leaves-insects-and-wildflowers-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 23 Apr 2015 11:47:32 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

This year a great biology teacher died and his name was Bob Fredericks. Riverside High School was a relatively new high school compared to others in Western Pennsylvania and Mr. Fredericks brought a level of education that his students embraced. Ironically, his mother was my fifth grade teacher at North Star School. Our advanced biology class included an assignment of collecting 50 species of insects, 50 different species of wild flowers and 50 leaves from trees within our area. Butterfly nets were provided along with a "Ball" jar laced with formaldehyde to "prepare" the bugs. Leaves were picked, pressed, mounted and identified as to class and species. As for the insects, Darryl Smialek made the task easier by putting the top down on his convertible as we motored through the valleys with eight nets protruding from the car. Trekking through the "woods" on a beautiful Spring day with my girlfriend, Sue Welsh, accomplished the plant-collecting assignment even though her Mom and Dad were disturbed that she contracted poison ivy. The U.S. Forest Service releases a wildflower map that identifies hundreds of locations, on and outside National Forests, for prime wildflower identifications. The map includes 317 wildflower viewing areas on National Forest System lands, referenced by state. Their website also includes more than 10,000 plant images. Regardless of your travels for our final April weekend, you can check seasonal and territorial wildflowers at: http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/viewing/.


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Pat Shingleton: "Wildflowers and Insects" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wildflowers-and-insects-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wildflowers-and-insects-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 22 Apr 2015 3:57:57 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

This year a great biology teacher died and his name was Bob Fredericks.  Riverside High School was a relatively new high school compared to others in Western Pennsylvania and Mr. Fredericks brought a level of education that his students embraced. Ironically, his mother was my fifth grade teacher at North Star School. Our advanced biology class included an assignment of collecting 50 species of insects, 50 different species of wild flowers and 50 leaves from trees within our area. Butterfly nets were provided along with a "Ball" jar laced with formaldehyde to "prepare" the bugs. Leaves were picked, pressed, mounted and identified as to class and species. As for the insects,  Darryl Smialek made the task easier by putting the top down on his convertible as we motored through the valleys with eight nets protruding from the car. Trekking through the "woods" on a beautiful Spring day with my girlfriend, Sue Welsh, accomplished the plant-collecting assignment even though her Mom and Dad were disturbed that she contracted poison ivy. The U.S. Forest Service  releases a wildflower map that identifies hundreds of locations, on and outside National Forests, for prime wildflower identifications. The map includes 317 wildflower viewing areas on National Forest System lands, referenced by state. Their website also includes more than 10,000 plant images. Regardless of your travels for our final April weekend, you can check seasonal and territorial wildflowers at: http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/viewing/.

 


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Pat Shingleton: "April Consequences" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-april-consequences--72044/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-april-consequences--72044/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 22 Apr 2015 12:27:55 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On April 18, 1927, the Great Flood of Louisiana implemented the existing levee system. Imperfect engineering and shoddy construction caused the collapse of dams, such as the Johnstown Flood of 1889. On May 16, 1874, 138 people died due to poor construction and a dam break in Williamsburg, MA. On March 12, 1928, the St. Francis Dam, in service less than two years, collapsed near Santa Paula, CA, killing 450. February 26, 1972, two coal slag dams along Buffalo Creek in southern West Virginia broke, unloading two miles of backed-up water into a lower dam that exploded, 4,000 homes were washed away with 125 deaths. June 5, 1976, the 305-foot Teton Dam collapsed, released 80 billion gallons of water into adjoining farmland. April is for Spring showers and also represents the foggiest month for South Louisiana. On April 20, 1952, the tankers Esso Suez and Esso Greensboro collided in dense fog, 200 miles south of Morgan City. The Suez incurred a 20-foot bow gash with both ships bursting into flames. River pilots are trained to navigate during episodes of dense fog and at this time-of-the-year, northern snow melt increases the level of the Mississippi. Fog caused the worst aviation accident in history when two Boeing 747s collided on the runway in the Canary Islands in 1977, killing 582. On July 25, 1956, the Andrea Doria sank after colliding with the Stockholm in dense fog, 45 miles south of Nantucket Light taking 51 lives.


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Pat Shingleton: "April Flooding, April Fog" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-april-flooding-april-fog-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-april-flooding-april-fog-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 21 Apr 2015 3:53:47 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On April 18, 1927, the Great Flood of Louisiana implemented the existing levee system. Imperfect engineering and shoddy construction caused the collapse of dams, such as the Johnstown Flood of 1889. On May 16, 1874, 138 people died due to poor construction and a dam break in Williamsburg, MA. On March 12, 1928, the St. Francis Dam, in service less than two years, collapsed near Santa Paula, CA, killing 450. February 26, 1972, two coal slag dams along Buffalo Creek in southern West Virginia broke, unloading two miles of backed-up water into a lower dam that exploded, 4,000 homes were washed away with 125 deaths. June 5, 1976, the 305-foot Teton Dam collapsed, released 80 billion gallons of water into adjoining farmland. April is for Spring showers and also represents the foggiest month for South Louisiana. On April 20, 1952, the tankers Esso Suez and Esso Greensboro collided in dense fog, 200 miles south of Morgan City. The Suez incurred a 20-foot bow gash with both ships bursting into flames. River pilots are trained to navigate during episodes of dense fog and at this time-of-the-year, northern snow melt increases the level of the Mississippi. Fog caused the worst aviation accident in history when two Boeing 747s collided on the runway in the Canary Islands in 1977, killing 582. On July 25, 1956, the Andrea Doria sank after colliding with the Stockholm in dense fog, 45 miles south of Nantucket Light taking 51 lives.


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Pat Shingleton: "The First Flood Gate" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-first-flood-gate-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-first-flood-gate-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 20 Apr 2015 4:41:40 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Completing my original column from Saturday, and engineer James Francis' recommendation to the city of Lowell, MA. Francis implored the city fathers of the need and the construction of a massive gate to deflect flood waters. The gate would drop in place to close off the entrance of feeder canals to the Merrimack River. The project was approved, as the design would be similar to gates used to defend castles against invaders in medieval Europe. His contemporaries ridiculed the idea but in April, 1852, the Merrimack was on-the-rise and Francis decided to lower the gate for the first time. On April 22, 1852, the river crested seven inches higher than the flood of 1785 and the gate, snug in granite, held fast. The massive gate deflected the flood waters, saving Lowell from destruction. Twenty-four hours later, a second wall of water, 28 feet high, bombarded the stone-bound gate and again it held. For more than 140 years, "Francis' Folly" is still used.


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Pat Shingleton: "Engineering a River" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-engineering-a-river-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-engineering-a-river-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 17 Apr 2015 2:53:51 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

A week's worth of rain has kept us under a Flash Flood watch with isolated warnings in some locations. At the end of April and in early May, 2011, we monitored and reported on the rise of the Mississippi. Snow melt in the north and flooding rains through the Midwest resulted in the opening of the Morganza Spillway on May 14, 2011. In 1848, Lowell, MA was the center of the American textile industry. Much of the city's success was due to James Bicheno Francis, chief engineer of locks and canals. Francis constructed a five-mile system of canals, drawing water from the Merrimack River, providing an uninterrupted source of power to a dozen textile mills. Changes in the river level were controlled by a system of gates and locks built into the canal network. He compiled a history of floods on the Merrimack and discovered that during a major flood in 1785, the river crested above Pawtucket Falls at 13 feet 6 inches. With the city of Lowell 30 feet lower than the falls, Francis realized that if the river soared to crest levels again; surging water would funnel through the canals, destroying the heart of the city. The engineer proposed building a massive gate to prevent this tragedy. How he did it and the response in Sunday's column.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Stinky Situation" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-stinky-situation--71852/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-stinky-situation--71852/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 16 Apr 2015 4:42:56 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Mid-April frontal passages send us showers and thundershowers along with clearing skies, north to northwest winds and drying. The last six days of rain, showers and thundershowers are the result of a sluggish upper level low that rakes moisture and showers our way. Thus...the reason why we're under a Flood Watch through Friday evening. Our traditional northwest winds that accompany a frontal passage send "whiffs" to us that are either pleasant or offensive. The paper mills in the Felicianas eject a smell that reminds me of burning tomatoes from the Heinz plant in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Flowers Baking Company on Florida Blvd. sends an aroma that reminds me of Mom's kitchen on Thursday night's where loaves of fresh bread met strawberry preserves and crunchy peanut butter. Hazen's milk topped off our dinner for that night. A south wind advances an offensive odor from the treatment plant near River Road. In Irwindale, CA. Huy Fong Foods manufacture Sriracha, a spicy Asian hot sauce. Last year, the production of the sauce released a variety of odors including garlic, peppers and vinegar. Some residents didn't like it, others didn't mind it. Environmental scientists were forced to monitor the odors at numerous locations due to complaints. It's another example that a stiff wind can move the "smell" or provide the aroma.


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Pat Shingleton: "Maybe it Stinks, Maybe it Doesn't" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-maybe-it-stinks-maybe-it-doesn-t-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-maybe-it-stinks-maybe-it-doesn-t-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 15 Apr 2015 5:37:41 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Mid-April frontal passages send us showers and thundershowers along with clearing skies, north to northwest winds and drying. The last six days of rain, showers and thundershowers are the result of a sluggish upper level low that rakes moisture and showers our way. Thus... the reason why we're under a Flood Watch through Friday evening. Our traditional northwest winds that accompany a frontal passage send "whiffs" to us that are either pleasant or offensive. The paper mills in the Felicianas eject a smell that reminds me of burning tomatoes from the Heinz plant in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Flowers Baking Company on Florida Blvd. sends an aroma that reminds me of Mom's kitchen on Thursday night's where loaves of fresh bread met strawberry preserves and crunchy peanut butter. Hazen's milk topped off our dinner for that night. A south wind advances an offensive odor from the treatment plant near River Road. In Irwindale, CA. Huy Fong Foods manufacture Sriracha, a spicy Asian hot sauce. Last year, the production of the sauce released a variety of odors including garlic, peppers and vinegar. Some residents didn't like it, others didn't mind it. Environmental scientists were forced to monitor the odors at numerous locations due to complaints. It's another example that a stiff wind can move the "smell" or provide the aroma.


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Pat Shingleton: "Surfin' Safari" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-surfin-safari-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-surfin-safari-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 14 Apr 2015 4:48:15 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Gulf Coast surfers get excited when a tropical storm or hurricane spins through the Gulf of Mexico. Surfers are now assisting researchers for environmental improvements. Benjamin Thompson is an engineer, oceanographic expert and an avid surfer. He recently invented "SmartPhin," a small sensor that is attached to the fin of surfboard to collect data on water temperature, salinity and pH levels. The sensor also targets the waves that a surfer is traversing. Once a day of surfing is completed the data is uploaded to a smartphone and then transmitted to data servers. Conventional technology utilized other instrumentation, similar to tiny buoys, located in the break zone which is within a visible distance to the shore and where most surfing is done. The "SmartPhin" is a natural solution in advancing data collection. Knowing the components of the ocean in all depths and capacities will provide valuable forecasts in the future. The surfboard has now become a collection terminal with hopes that additional surfers and their boards will provide assistance in the future.

 


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Pat Shingleton: "Kites and Checks..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-kites-and-checks-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-kites-and-checks-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 13 Apr 2015 3:55:27 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

I enjoyed a couple of days off last week and didn't forward a few columns. Over the weekend, Kite Fest Louisiane' had lower wind and a big episode of showers Saturday. In years past our beach trips included launching the kite. Aerodynamic design innovations have furthered kite flying to new "heights" that include multiple line maneuvering. The kite was first constructed in China, 2800 years ago, using silk and bamboo for a lightweight yet strong framework. In my early years, Nick Sudano's dad would construct our kites using sections of the Ellwood City Ledger glued to strips of balsa wood with a long tail for additional stability. March and April were perfect for kites as strong cold fronts provided northwest winds that kept our kites aloft for hours. In references to "wind," here's another item. On April 11, 1991 a cancelled check was sucked up by tornado in Stockton, Kansas. It was carried 223 miles to Robert Melcher's farm near Winnetoon, Nebraska. John Knox, an associate professor of geography at the University of Georgia, has researched airborne debris, carried by twisters, to better understand the intricacies of this weather phenomenon. Back then, Knox and his students categorized items by weight such as a Hackleburg, Alabama high school cheer leading jacket that flew 66 miles to Elkmont, Alabama, during a tornado outbreak. On April 27, 2011, more than 120 tornadoes caused 300 deaths across the South and retrieved items were compared to the direction of the storms. Regardless of weight, researchers determined that most of the debris fell slightly left of the storm's track. This research assisted in what is now known as a "debris field," now an additional component in tornado analysis. On a personal note, thanks to those that have responded to the many years that my column appeared in The Advocate. I deeply appreciate your feedback and your review of my weather-related items with great news to come, in the future, in that regard.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Masters-Masterful!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-masters-masterful-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-masters-masterful-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 8 Apr 2015 3:35:41 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:


In 1943, Augusta National, home of The Masters, suspended play; transformed back into a farm to help the war effort. German prisoners-of-war provided renovation work to erect the famous bridge over Rae's Creek. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe, became a member of Augusta and a landmark bears his name -The Eisenhower Cabin. The other landmark was a lob-lolly pine, 210 yards from the tee on number 17. Ike hated the tree because his low draw compromised his second shot. In February of 2014, an ice storm toppled the 125 year old pine and it wasn't replaced.However, pine cone seeds from the tree were planted with a plaque designating the tree. "Ike" was honored with the naming of another tree at the Dalmeny Golf Club in Scotland in 1946. An acorn from the tree was forwarded to Augusta to replant his tree. The entrance to Augusta National includes 122 Magnolia trees that canopy the club's entrance. Ten years ago, my son Michael and I enjoyed the final rounds of The Masters. Our friend Paddy Quigley provided guidance, suggesting placement of portable chairs on #18 before walking the course. Our chairs were steps away from the playoff with Tiger Woods and Chris DeMarco. Augusta National embraces tree reforestation and a radar system that conserves water, reducing runoff. The parking area is unpaved to embrace natural absorption. Showers halted play as we were surprised to hear what sounded like an engine. Standing water and puddles on the greens were eliminated as underground suction devices removed the results of the shower; play resumed.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Mississippi and the Red" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-mississippi-and-the-red-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-mississippi-and-the-red-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 7 Apr 2015 3:51:11 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In April of 2011, concern was building when the Mississippi River started to rise. The flooding continued into May with damage compared to similar events in 1927 and 1993. Four years ago, two major storm systems threw down record rainfall on the Mississippi River watershed. An abundance of snow that winter added to the flooding as the traditional snow melt sent record levels into early May. In addition to Louisiana... Illinois, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee and Arkansas became federal disaster areas. As we also remember, for the first time in 37 years, the Morganza Spillway was opened as 4,600 square miles of rural wetlands were flooded. From the Big Muddy to the Big Red. I remember lots of Tiger Dams and sand bags on numerous locations along River Road. Parish flood experts follow a potential flooding procedure to assist citizens when the water rises. Meanwhile, April in Fargo, North Dakota, includes a "right-of-Spring" that involves the flooding of the Red River. The Red River identifies the state line between North Dakota and Minnesota and following the winter snow-melt the river rapidly soars to bank full. To the north, the river also flows through Winnipeg, Canada, where flood control structures were constructed in the ‘60s. Another aspect of the "right-of-Spring" and Red River flooding are students assisting city officials by preparing thousands of sand bags.

 

 

 


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Pat Shingleton: "Cracking Eggs and Cracking the Bat..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-cracking-eggs-and-cracking-the-bat-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-cracking-eggs-and-cracking-the-bat-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 6 Apr 2015 3:02:45 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

I was engrossed in numerous religious services since last Tuesday and neglected to extend a few columns over the weekend. Permit me to "catch-up" with an item or two. Early Sunday provided a great opportunity for the outdoor egg hunts with a batch of needed rain hitting us in the late afternoon and early evening. Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches originated the Easter tradition of coloring hardboiled eggs.This tradition represents eggs that are dyed red to represent the blood of Christ, shed on the Cross and the hard shell of the egg symbolized the sealed Tomb of Christ. The cracking of the hard egg symbolizes Christ's resurrection from the dead. Our Easter egg hunts in Western Pennsylvania were held regardless of the weather. It wasn't unusual to find a colored egg plugged in a pocket of mud. A review of our picture albums and scrapbooks showed my Great-Aunt, Catherine, who shared holidays with us, sitting next to the dining room window with snow drifts outside on Easter Sunday. Those snow drifts held the Easter eggs that we later found after the spring thaw. From cracking the eggs to cracking the bats. The 2015 Major League Baseball Season began Sunday night in Chicago. I visited with an old classmate, over the years, verifying the difficulties of cold weather and baseball. Our ace, Bob Haine, had a great fastball; tossing a no-hitter our senior year with the Riverside Panthers of Ellwood City, PA. Riverside has enjoyed a previous state championships under the guidance of Danny Oliastro, our assistant coach under the late Ed Ellenich. Ed was obsessed with his hometown rivalry Monaca. Our first game began with snow flurries and 30 degrees. Ahead in the sixth inning, Andy Miller dropped a fly, costing two runs. Bob's hands were numb from the sting of the bat and for punching Dave Pelloni in the head, earlier in the week.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Passover Moon" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-passover-moon-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-passover-moon-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 2 Apr 2015 3:25:16 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Passover begins tonight at sundown - 7:25 PM. Moon rise tonight is scheduled for 6:55 PM. Astronomers determine a full moon by calculating the percentage of illumination and tonight's full moon will represent a 99.8% illumination.An ancient "school of thought" suggested that "light" was needed for the Jewish people to leave Egypt, in darkness, and begin their journey out of bondage. Assisting them in the dark-of-the-night was a full moon, similar to the full moon tonight. Native American's refer to the April full moon as the "Full Pink Moon," Hebrews referred to it as the Passover Moon. Easter is calculated as the first Sunday after the paschal full moon or the first full moon after the vernal equinox, which began on March 20th. The Moon phase remains a factor when Easter occurs during the Liturgical year. Lent began 44 days ago and Easter can fall anywhere between March 22nd and April 25th.


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Pat Shingleton: "Wind Set-Down and A Passover Moon" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wind-set-down-and-a-passover-moon-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wind-set-down-and-a-passover-moon-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 1 Apr 2015 3:43:25 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

"Wind Set-Down" occurs when strong winds blow over water for an extended period of time, shifting the water body downward. This shift causes a low-angle tilt and the upwind, shore water level drops. "As the sun sank over the Nile Delta, a man stood on-shore... raising his rod as a howling wind blew for the east. In the morning the sea was gone, blown to the west; permitting people to walk upon dry ground where the day before fish swam and boats sailed." The man was not Moses, as described in Exodus 14, but Major-General Sir Alexander B. Tuloch, holding a surveyor's rod, not a staff, in 1882. On the western end of Lake Erie, "Wind Set Down" occurrences have occasionally dropped the lake by 2 meters.


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Pat Shingleton: " Super Brown Frosty" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-super-brown-frosty--71346/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-super-brown-frosty--71346/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 31 Mar 2015 5:05:11 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Don't be surprised if your friends and relatives in the "northern" extremes experience another episode of snow. There were numerous occasions that Easter Sunday in Western Pennsylvania included an Easter Egg hunt around snow drifts. In reference to the snow, on this date 27 years ago, Myron L. Ace and eight of his com-padres made the Guinness Book of World Records thanks to a big batch of wet snow. I guess with nothing else to do, these guys accessed a crane to pile eight inch blocks of snow in the shape of a snowman. This event occurred in Anchorage, Alaska. It took three weeks, in the cold, to finish the record setting snowman. Immediately after the huge snowman was completed, Anchorage was hit with a dust storm, driven by 70 mile-per-hour winds. Myron and his Band of Eight, originally named their masterpiece, "Super Frosty" and after the dust-up, it was renamed "Super Brown Frosty," replicating a sculpture of brown sugar.


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Pat Shingleton: "Go Fig...Ure..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-go-fig-ure-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-go-fig-ure-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 30 Mar 2015 4:46:52 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

You may remember the parable of the Roman general questioning an old man and his efforts in planting a fig tree. The general contends that it will take twenty years for the tree to give fruit suggesting that the old Jewish man will be dead by then. So notes the old man, "When I was a small child, I could eat fruit because those who came before me planted trees. Am I not obliged to do the same for the next generation?" This Midrash tale was presented in "ritualwell" and showcases the unique nature of the fig tree with many varieties available in South Louisiana. To compliment the planting there are Jewish traditions that involve the shoveling of dirt at the graveside to signify an end of physical life while a shovelful on a fig tree signifies the beginning of life through the gift of memory and sharing the telling of stories. This tradition continues as the Jewish National Fund encourages tree planting and the revitalization of forests in Israel by honoring those in the congregation. You may have noticed many synagogues displaying "trees of life." The leaves further acknowledge the names of past and present members and their families. More on the fig tree is referenced during this Holy Week and Jesus' travels from Jerusalem to Bethany. Expecting to find some juicy figs, the tree had no fruit, thus the parable when he cursed the tree. The fruit of the fig tree actually appears before the leaves and in Jerusalem, depending upon climate and conditions, it is possible that a tree might produce fruit ten out of twelve months.

 


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Pat Shingleton: "Timing Your Weed and Feed..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-timing-your-weed-and-feed-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-timing-your-weed-and-feed-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 26 Mar 2015 3:52:11 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Before Home Dept and Lowe's the "neighborhood" hardware stores provided home-repair necessities. Perkins Road Hardware was one of those locations, as was Naylor Brother's Hardware on Government Street. The Boyd family not only provides needed hardware and assistance but has also parlayed outdoor cooking into their venue at Goodwood Hardware. Many of us use Miracle Grow to compliment our fertilizing needs and years ago they "closed-out" Goodwood Hardware due to a national relationship with the previously mentioned "big boys." I stopped by Goodwood Hardware on Wednesday to purchase a couple of "needles" to "air-up" my speed bag that I enjoy punching. I visited with "Your Goodwood Hardware Man" - Jeff. Jeff is the go-to guy for home repair suggestions and noted, "Pat, you don't hear too many people, around here, complaining when it doesn't rain." Jeff always enjoys a complimentary stogie from Grey Hammett. The Weather Team fields calls and messages about the timing of rain and fertilizer applications. We received a scathing e-mail Saturday afternoon and a complaining viewer concering no rain during the afternoon when his lawn applications were completed. He did receive a predicted soaker later in the evening, we didn't receive an apology on that one. Jeff and I discussed the weed-and-feed sales and apparently Bill Boyd didn't order enough from his vendor. Jeff assured me that more was about to arrive Wednesday and extended an invitation to me to help Bill and the boys unload the truck.


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