WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2017, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Thu, 22 Jun 2017 12:06:42 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Lee Then, Cindy Now..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lee-then-cindy-now-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lee-then-cindy-now-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 20 Jun 2017 11:49:36 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

In our weather briefings we attempt to provide our viewers and readers an opportunity to draw comparisons to previous storms.  Our reports on Tuesday found neighbors helping neighbors in sand-bagging, preparing for the worst and hoping to be spared. Last August's devastation keeps those horrible memories in place for residents not only reflecting but advancing preparations. Looking back, Tropical Storm Lee replicates Cindy and made landfall on September 4, 2011 southwest of Baton Rouge, tracking across Tangipahoa Parish then to Hattiesburg, Mississippi , Birmingham and Memphis.  Here is an excerpt form an archived column on the storm fromsix years ago. "This morning, former Tropical Depression 13 will become Tropical Storm Lee in the Gulf of Mexico. The path of this storm is bound for Lafayette at daybreak Saturday morning with projected winds of 60 m.p.h. Rainfall potential in the Baton Rouge area could elevate between four to seven inches. The worst tropical storm to hit our area and state was Tropical Storm Allison, banging the Texas coast on June 25, 1989 while it unloaded two feet of rain in 36 hours. It then tracked out of southeast Texas, dumping a pile of gulf moisture to the tune of 12 inches of rain. Record rainfall in Winnfield, Louisiana was 25.67 inches in 48 hours. Your Labor Day weekend will be soggy but it’s nothing we can’t handle." Cindy will make landfall overnight, close to the 2:00 AM hour.  Wave heights will increase with a possible extensive flooding episode for the southeast sections of the state. Therefore the Flash Flood Watch is posted and a Tornado Watch is in effect until tonight.


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Pat Shingleton: "Frog Ice and No A.C." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-frog-ice-and-no-a-c-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-frog-ice-and-no-a-c-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 15 Jun 2017 10:31:50 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On this date in 1882, Dubuque Iowa’s Monthly Weather Review noted that “frog-hail” was recorded following a thunderstorm.  Residents reported that melting hailstones disclosed small living frogs while larger chunks of ice also contained living frogs.  The ice chunks measured between one and seventeen inches in diameter, varying from an inch to the size of baseballs and the biggest chunk weighed nearly two pounds.  The Monthly Weather Review believed that the objects may not have been legitimate hailstones but a cluster of larger stones melted together.  In Pontiac, Canada, in 1864, falling ice between an inch and two inches contained small frogs and in a town that no longer exists, Bovington, Mississippi, a six-by-eight inch gopher turtle fell from a thunderstorm, entirely encased in ice. In closing, if you're visiting from other parts of the country, sometimes it's hotter and steamier than this. Years ago, air-conditioning was limited to stores, offices and bars. Air conditioning today provides comfort in the car, bus, train, and jet, with numerous units for the house and office. Fifty years ago, keeping cool occurred by moving air and ventilation, courtesy of an electric fan. Older homes in our area included a 4-by-4 fan - in the attic, creating comfort, solely on the principle of circulation. With screened windows, a persistent draft of air would flow from room to room. The ceiling fan also enhanced the movement of air. By re-circulating the rising heat, this simple, time-tested device provided a downdraft of comfortable air to individual rooms. 


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Pat Shingleton: "Mermaid Sightings and Purple Lips" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-mermaid-sightings-and-purple-lips-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-mermaid-sightings-and-purple-lips-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 14 Jun 2017 10:29:15 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

As we become acclimated to the heat, we seek ways to cool down.  Years ago, when the inflatable pool was “shot-up” with a B.B. gun from Doug Kelly, my Mom would take a wash tub, fill it with cold water and stick my brother Kevin in there for a few days.  He enjoyed it even though his lips were purple.  Once Dale and Thelma Lutz built a swimming pool, they kindly invited the entire neighborhood to seek relief. When my wife and I visit Rainbow Delights on North Harrell’s Ferry, inevitably, I get a “brain-freeze.”  It also happened to Kevin at J and T Custard Stand where the Krebs family delivered an ice-cream beyond compare. The closest to this in Baton Rouge is the new "Freddies" on Siegen.  Kevin kept cool with purple lips and a headache. On this date in 1608, navigator Henry Hudson sighted a mermaid while sailing through the arctic waters of Russia. “The Almanac of the Infamous, Incredible and Ignored” notes that Christopher Columbus reportedly spotted three mermaids in the Caribbean in 1493 and later logged additional sightings off the coast of Guinea.  In 1614, explorer John Smith spied a young woman in the West Indies. Other sightings date back to 1610 in Newfoundland waters where Captain Whitbourne described a sea creature with the face of a woman. In 1917, the Leonidas, sailing from America to France, was accompanied by a mermaid for six hours. Finally, a “merman” wiggled from a fisherman’s net in India in 1937.


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Pat Shingleton: "Old Glory and Flag Day..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-old-glory-and-flag-day-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-old-glory-and-flag-day-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 13 Jun 2017 10:30:57 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Hopefully today you will  view numerous flags on Independence Blvd. adjacent to the park.  Traveling on  Airline Highway you'll easily recognize the giant American flag at Robinson Brothers.  Chip Robinson and his staff perform an incredible service to Old Glory each and every day, not just today. Whether it's a gentle breeze, or a hefty gust, the Robinson Brother's flag is a tremendous tribute. Today is Flag Day, originating in 1885 when school teacher, B.J. Cigrand, encouraged his students in the Fredonia, Wisco Public School, to proudly display the flag of the United States of America.  It also commemorates the official anniversary of the adoption of the Stars and Stripes at the Betsy Ross House on June 14, 1891.  Our flag is flown from sunrise to sunset and illuminated at night.  It shouldn't be flown in rain or inclement weather and is raised briskly and at sunset lowered slowly.


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Pat Shingleton: "Old Phrases..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-old-phrases-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-old-phrases-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 13 Jun 2017 12:01:17 AM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

We recently recognized why bride’s carried a bouquet at a wedding to not throwing out the baby with the bath water.  When it was raining cats and dogs in the 1500s the animals were actually falling from thatched roofs. Another tidbit from that era was the floor of dirt. Only the wealthy had slate floors and during wet weather a layer of thresh was placed on the slippery surface for better footing. During the winter months, piles of thresh would cover the doorway and once opened, the thresh would spill onto the entryway, creating the word “threshold.”  In the kitchen a large kettle hung over the fire with the daily task of stoking the fire and adding vegetables to the pot.  Leftovers would chill overnight and the process would continue leading to the rhyme,  "Peas’ porridge hot, peas’ porridge cold, peas’ porridge in the pot nine days old."  With limited access to  food stuffs, a slab of bacon became a sign of wealth and the recognition that a man "could really bring home the bacon" and sharing the bacon led to the guests "chewing the fat."  Only the well-to-do had plates of pewter while the poor used wooden bowls called trenchers.  The trenchers were rarely washed and bacteria and worms got into the wood causing cases of "trench mouth" for those that used the bowls.  Finally, the English ran out of places to bury people and would re-use graves.  Some relocated coffins displayed inside scratch marks for those buried alive.  A string was tied on the wrist of a dead person and re-connnected to an above-ground bell.. Someone on the "graveyard shift" would identify a "dead ringer" or someone "saved by the bell."


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Pat Shingleton: "Bombing the Golf Course and Tarzan" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bombing-the-golf-course-and-tarzan-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bombing-the-golf-course-and-tarzan-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 6 Jun 2017 10:42:04 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

A final column related to D-Day and the invasion of Europe during WorldWar II noting shots from the air and on a golf course.  Nazi aircraft were constantlyattacking northern England and their flight path sent them over an area where numerous gol fcourses were located. The Luftwaffe would load the barrels of their guns with wax which wasa proven method of preventing the barrels from being clogged with ice.  As they crossed thecoast they would purposely “clear their guns” by firing a rounds at golf courses. The constant strafing prompted precautionary actions from those on-the-ground attempting a few "shots"of their own. The Richmond Golf Club alerted their players with revised rules that includedthe following: “Players should collect Shrapnel splinters that damage the Mowing machines.During Gunfire or while Bombs are falling, players may take cover without penalty for ceasingplay. The position of delayed action bombs are marked by red flags. A ball moved by enemyaction may be replaced. A ball in a crater may be lifted. If a bomb explosion affects a playerand another ball is played-1 stroke penalty. One club length for bomb splinters and Shrapnel.”Another anniversary found memories of Mom and Dad packing us into the Ford station wagon, heading to Spotlight 88 with two shopping bags of buttered popcorn and thermoses of Kool-Aid. The feature that night starred Johnny Weissmuller in one of his Tarzan flicks. Back then, the audio for the movie originated from a speaker, attached to a post that hung on your window. On this particular evening, off and on showers occurred upon our arrival, intervals of heavier showers continued until a tremendous thunderstorm ensued. The movie continued with static erupting from the window speaker as wipers were swishing away the rain. Expecting only a temporary shower, we watched the movie and enjoyed aa brilliant lightning display. Just as Tarzan was swinging through the jungle, with Chita at his side, it happened... he went off the screen and we looked to the right. Thinking, as kids do, that he landed in an adjacent field, Dad said, "We're leaving!" The strong storm toppled the huge, outdoor screen. Dad peeled-out-of-the-lot, homeward bound. The next morning our brother, Denis, discovered the previously referenced "audio" speaker still attached to the car window.


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Pat Shingleton: "Overlord and Allison" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-overlord-and-allison-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-overlord-and-allison-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 5 Jun 2017 10:29:38 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

As we have endured eight days of daily rain, it doesn't compare to June 7, 2001 and Tropical Storm Allison that weakened to a depression and stalled over eastern Texas.  On June 8, the remnants of the storm drifted south, re-forming over the northwestern Gulf of Mexico.  The system lingered, spun and reorganized as a tropical cyclone before moving inland over Louisiana on the 11th. That morning, the winds increased to 45 m.p.h., as the center moved across southeastern Louisiana and southeastern Mississippi.  On June 14 it became a sub-tropical depression and tracked east-northeast, stalling over eastern North Carolina. For three days it wandered around the mid-Atlantic coast, merged with a cold front and dissipated in Nova Scotia on the 19th.  Allison was a tremendous rain machine dumping 36.99 inches on Houston and more than 20 inches in Baton Rouge.  It caused $5 billion damage and 41 deaths and became the costliest and deadliest U.S. tropical storm on record. The invasion of Europe on June 6, 1944 was the greatest military operation in history. If the weather was unfavorable for Operation Overlord, it would have postponed the invasion for two weeks until tides were suitable for landing.  Weatherwise Magazine reported that in 1944, there were no meteorological observations or the use of computer models. Years ago, predicting the weather over the English Channel was challenging.  Weathermen depended on secretive ship and plane reports and from spies on the European mainland.  These observations were coded, forwarded to England and tediously plotted to maps by hand. Numerous groups extrapolated the data including: a civilian group in Dunstable, England, The British Meteorological Service, U.S forecasters called “Widewing” and the British Navy. On May 31, 1944, a series of low pressure systems from Nova Scotia to Scotland displayed characteristics of a possible hurricane. The persistent Azores high could deflect the storms however with too much cloud cover, the advance bombers would be useless; too much wind and the landing craft couldn’t function.  Dr. J.M. Stagg , Operational Meteorologist, coordinated all forecasts to produce a consensus that met the approval of General Eisenhower who attended the daily weather briefings.  Initially, Stagg was not optimistic about the invasion and encouraged a postponement to the Supreme Commander on June 4. On June 5, he predicted that “tolerable” weather was expected on the Normandy Coast for the landing on June 6.


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Pat Shingleton: http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--97622/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--97622/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 2 Jun 2017 6:00:18 PM Pat shingleton: "Another 179 Days..." Pat Shingleton:

With 17 days remaining until the official start of Summer, 179 days remain in Hurricane Season 2017. Hurricanes make headlines and breaking news and that was certainly the case years ago.  The nation's deadliest disaster happened in 1900 when a hurricane struck Galveston, Texas.  Storm surge caused 8,000 deaths with estimates as high as 12,000.  The "Atlantic-Gulf Hurricane of 1919" hit Corpus Christi in mid-September with a 12-foot storm surge and 900 deaths while 1,836 died September 13, 1928 from a lake surge following the Okeechobee hurricane.  The "Florida Keys-Labor Day Hurricane of 1935" moved through the Florida Keys and the Southeast killing 408. The "Long Island Express of 1938" battered southern New England and in 1944 the "Great Atlantic Hurricane" sank a Navy destroyer, minesweeper, two Coast Guard cutters and a light vessel.  Hurricane Carol caused $461 million in damage on August 31, 1954.  A few days later Hurricane Edna blasted Cape Cod killing 20. In 1954,  Hurricane Hazel hit the Carolinas. On October 15th, Hazel moved through Pennsylvania, New York and Canada.  One year later, Hurricanes Connie and Diane were only five days apart, nailing North Carolina, then flooding Massachusetts.  Residents of Baton Rouge and the Texas coast remember Hurricane Audrey in June 1957.  Storm surges advanced inland for 25 miles, killing 390.  In September, 1965, Betsy hit Lafourche Parish, killing 75 in Louisiana.  Another hurricane making headlines for Baton Rouge was Camille in August 1969.  Winds, storm surge and rain killed 143 on the coast. Adding to this list is Alicia in 1983, which battered Galveston and Hugo in 1989 swamped Charleston, South Carolina. Before Katrina, Isaac and Rita,  Andrew tore apart Baton Rouge in 1992 and Floyd Hammered Cape Fear in 1999.


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Pat Shingleton: "June Weddings..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-june-weddings-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-june-weddings-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 1 Jun 2017 5:58:48 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

By tradition May and June have historically been designated as "Wedding Months" with society sections of local newspapers recognizing engagements and weddings. Fairly Edrington and Joseph Carville will exchange  vows Saturday evening here in Baton Rouge with plenty of "cover" from pop-up showers and lots of air-conditioning. Long before air conditioning, antiperspirants and perfumes, hot temperatures and high humidity created some bothersome odors. To combat these “smells”, brides would carry a bouquet of flowers. The wedding bouquet and the tossing of such remains today as matrimony tradition. Years ago, roofs on houses were thatched with thick straw and no rafters. The straw protected dogs, cats, mice and bugs from the elements. During persistent showers, thunderstorms or a brief downpour, the animals and insects would fall from the roof. These episodes initiated the saying… “It’s raining cats and dogs.” 


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Pat Shingleton: "Hurricane Season 2017" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hurricane-season-2017-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hurricane-season-2017-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 31 May 2017 10:31:00 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

It’s Hurricane Season and if you missed our special, "Hurricane X" - Are you Prepared?, repeats will be showcased on Cox Cable Channel 18 at 5:00 PM on Thursday, June 1st, Friday, June 2nd at 9:00 AM and this Sunday at 9:00 PM. Advancing the question, is there anything that produces a blast of wind stronger than a hurricane?  Yes, a human cough, with a gust of approximately 300 miles per hour.  Number two on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a sneeze, at 75 to 100 miles per hour. Taking a 9 pound 2-by-4 and firing it 34 mph into a window simulates the effects of a hurricane on coastal structures. Research indicates that building damage during a hurricane is caused by window and door failure.  Blowing through a home, walls force outward, collapsing the structure.  Hurricane resistant windows include a plastic interlayer and the building industry has been challenged to design products to further protect windows and doors from flying debris.


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Pat Shingleton: "End of May Events" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-end-of-may-events-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-end-of-may-events-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 30 May 2017 10:31:28 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On May 31, 1889, heavy rains brought the Little Conemaugh River in Pennsylvania to bank full. The force of the river blasted through the South Fork Dam and funneled a wall of water 40 feet high at 22 feet per second into Johnstown, killing 2,100 people, leveling trees, houses and buildings in its path. Venice, Italy, is called the world's most serene city. Because of flooding, ancient buildings are dissolving and in 2003 they launched "Project Moses." Three inlets to the lagoon that surround Venice are now fitted with sixty foot, hollow steel gates. The gates lie flat on the sea floor and when high tide threatens, the gates will rise on hinges and block the flood. Here's some "end of May" weather events. On May 28, 1989 lightning in Leesburg, FL caused minor injuries when it landed between the shoulder blades of a nine-year-old boy while sitting at his dining room table. That same date in 1953 found a 600 yard-wide tornado in Fort Rice, ND that damaged every building while jamming church pews four feet into the ground. On May 29, 1978, a man in Camden, AR, was shocked by a lightning while using the phone even though the bolt hit blocks away. In 1948, the city of Vanport, OR was the state's second largest city. On May 30th a railroad fill-dike gave way sending the swollen Columbia River into the city. In two hours, fifteen feet of water destroyed 10,000 homes. Finally, 115 mph thunderstorm winds snapped more than 200 utility poles in Ouachita Parish on May 27,1997. Many residents were trapped in their cars due to downed power lines. 


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Pat Shingleton: "Heat Bursts" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-heat-bursts-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-heat-bursts-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 29 May 2017 10:11:43 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

From the mid-west to the Ohio Valley, it’s the season for “heat-bursts.”  A weather phenomena that generates 100 M.P.H. blasts of hot air. In Portugal on July 6, 1949 meteorological observers reported a temperature increase from 100 to 158 degrees F in two minutes. In the early evening of June 15, 1960 at Lake Whitney, Texas, the temperature rose to 140 degrees F in a few minutes with winds of 80 to 100 miles per hour. A nearby cotton field was completely scorched and car radiators boiled over.  A heat burst traditionally forms after sunset as warm, moist air that feeds a thunderstorm cuts off and the storm collapses. The rain in the top of the thunderhead drops into cool, dry air becomes compressed and hits the ground as a hot dry wind. What makes the heat burst so unusual is the high rate of speed at which the downdraft travels. Concluding with a story related t o the heat... Carlo Carretto became a monk at age 44 and lived a life of prayer in the Arabian desert. His book, “Letters from the Desert” tells how he rediscovered God’s glory in the starry skies of Arabia.  One excerpt notes: ”How dear the stars are to me, I know them by their names, I distinguish their color, size, position and beauty. I know my way around them and from them I calculate the time without a watch.”  George Washington Carver wrote: “I love to think of nature as an unlimited broadcasting system through which God speaks to us every hour, if we only tune in.”


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Pat Shingleton: http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--97486/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--97486/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 29 May 2017 10:02:01 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

From the mid-west to the Ohio Valley, it’s the season for “heat-bursts.”  A weather phenomena that generates 100 M.P.H. blasts of hot air. In Portugal on July 6, 1949 meteorological observers reported a temperature increase from 100 to 158 degrees F in two minutes. In the early evening of June 15, 1960 at Lake Whitney, Texas, the temperature rose to 140 degrees F in a few minutes with winds of 80 to 100 miles per hour. A nearby cotton field was completely scorched and car radiators boiled over.  A heat burst traditionally forms after sunset as warm, moist air that feeds a thunderstorm cuts off and the storm collapses. The rain in the top of the thunderhead drops into cool, dry air becomes compressed and hits the ground as a hot dry wind. What makes the heat burst so unusual is the high rate of speed at which the downdraft travels. Concluding with a story related t o the heat... Carlo Carretto became a monk at age 44 and lived a life of prayer in the Arabian desert. His book, “Letters from the Desert” tells how he rediscovered God’s glory in the starry skies of Arabia.  One excerpt notes: ”How dear the stars are to me, I know them by their names, I distinguish their color, size, position and beauty. I know my way around them and from them I calculate the time without a watch.”  George Washington Carver wrote: “I love to think of nature as an unlimited broadcasting system through which God speaks to us every hour, if we only tune in.”


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Pat Shingleton: "Decoration Day..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-decoration-day-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-decoration-day-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 26 May 2017 5:45:51 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:


Our late "Mum" would refer to Memorial Day as "Decoration Day" where visitations to grave sites included the placement of wreaths to those that died in service to our country. A special salute to veterans and those in service at this time.  Memorial Day also incorporates numerous outdoor activities and experts recommend the use of sunscreen, not just at the beach, golf course, pool or tennis court, but everyday.  Research indicates that 90 percent of Americans polled know someone who has been diagnosed with some form of skin cancer.  On cloudy days, 80 percent of the sun's rays cause sunburn. If you notice a shadow with your back to the sun, sunscreen is needed. Experts recommend applying sunscreen on sensitive places such as your face, ears, lips and the scalp. In reflecting on Memorial Day,  Steven Ambrose’s books, “Band of Brothers” and “D-Day” portrayed the experiences of individual soldiers during World War II.  Excerpts included references to the difficulties of the elements in America’s victories.  “Band of Brothers” became a mini-series on HBO.  In addition to Tom Brokaw’s book, “The Greatest Generation,” soldiers of both the European and Pacific Theaters were subjected to extreme weather conditions.  The Battle of the Bulge found the soldiers of Easy Company without adequate winter clothing, maneuvering through mud, snow and sub-zero weather.  The Steven Spielberg-Tom Hanks production, “Pacific,” also depicted challenging weather conditions where tropical rains slowed the advance of armaments and supplies. These are examples of service and those that served during tough times and tough conditions.


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Pat Shingleton: "Painting Your Roof..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-painting-your-roof-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-painting-your-roof-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 24 May 2017 10:30:53 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Luke Howard was the first to classify clouds in London in 1820.  He also identified urban heat islands 200 years ago, suggesting that buildings, people and industry create isolated areas of heat within a city.  The heat island effect is caused by urban materials absorbing and radiating solar heat.  Data released in Geophysical Research Letters advanced a  solution to decrease urban heat is painting all roofs white.  Reflecting solar radiation using white paint on urban roofs was discussed by environmental groups for decades and now is another example of adjusting to climate change.  Weatherwise magazine notes that asphalt roads, tar roofs and similar city surfaces absorb the sun’s heat and can raise temperatures by to 2 to 5 degrees. On May 25, 1955 an intense tornado struck Udall, Kansas. The twister killed 77, leveled the city and at that time was designated as the deadliest tornado in the state’s history. The nation’s single deadliest tornado occurred in Joplin, Missouri last Sunday. Jerrold Hoffman was a survivor of the Udall storm and three years ago he championed an effort to aid another Kansas town that was also ravaged. In May 2008, a tornado killed 10 and destroyed Greensburg, Kansas leveling the town’s buildings but also uprooted and killed 2,000 trees.  A one-day project by the 72-year-old Hoffman, turned into a tree-planting project. By soliciting residents and retirees the planted trees now encircle the entire city.  Udall now has healthy trees following their storm. 


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Pat Shingleton: "Weather Stories..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-weather-stories-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-weather-stories-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 23 May 2017 10:30:02 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Over the years readers and watchers have offered a few weather sayings such as:  "Catchy drawer and sticky door, coming rain will pour and pour."  This little ditty may be applicable to other parts of the country but for us, it happens all the time. During the winter months, the changes in temperature and humidity can cause our doors to occasionally stick and squeak with expansion and contraction.  Here's another: "When the glass falls low, prepare for a blow..." The mercury barometer is the "glass" and when the pressure is low, the mercury level is low with unsettled weather.  Back in the old days, these sayings were all that folks could rely on to determine changing weather. Here's another one... Bogus stories lace the colorful history of Death Valley, CA.  In 1874, the Virginia Territorial Enterprise’s editor needed space to fill.  He concocted a story about a scientist who invented a "solar armor" suit.  The scientist covered himself with a sponge-like material, saturated in water and set across the desert.  The article said they discovered the inventor perched on a rock, frozen solid.  Rapid evaporation supposedly turned the sponge into ice and his beard was covered with frost and a foot-long icicle hung from his nose.  The story had the trappings of scientific fact.  The hoax was reprinted by newspapers world-wide. Perspiring does lower the body temperature, as more people have died of dehydration in Death Valley than heat stroke. 


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Pat Shingleton: "The Sea Breeze..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-sea-breeze-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-sea-breeze-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 22 May 2017 10:59:42 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

You may have heard us mention a sea-breezse front during our weathercasts. A visit to the Gulf coast will also afford a sea-breeze experience. Sea-breezes are most powerful along the coast of Chile and are called the "Virazon" and often blow at gale force. The Virazon blows so hard it gathers and hurls pebbles at incredible speeds. Other sea breezes are pleasant and refreshing. The "datoo" that blows over Gibraltar, the "imbat" of Morocco, the "ponente" of western Italy, the "kapatilaa" of Hawaii and the "doctor" of tropical regions provide relief from the heat. Regardless of the name they developed in the same way. The sea-breeze begins as a gentle morning breeze, then the sun's energy heats the land and  the Earth's surface in turn heats the overlying air. The warm air over the land rises and cooler air moves onshore to replace it. As noted, the sea breeze can often have a marked front, similar to a tiny cold front with sea-breezes often pushing inland for over 100 miles.


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Pat Shingleton: "Amelia Earhart and Lightning Hits" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-amelia-earhart-and-lightning-hits-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-amelia-earhart-and-lightning-hits-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 19 May 2017 10:24:26 PM Pat Shingelton: Pat Shingleton:

On May 19, 1932, Amelia Earhart began a solo transatlantic flight from Harbour Grace, Newfoundland. The take-off occurred five years to the day when Charles Lindbergh flew from Long Island to Le Bourget Field in Paris.  Her red Lockheed Vega logged a smooth flight until midnight.  She then hit a severe thunderstorm and decreased her altitude after experiencing ice conditions.  Three hours into the flight her altimeter and gasoline gauges broke. With fuel running down the back of her neck, flames were shooting out of the manifold. Skimming the ocean surface to reduce icing and after 15 hours and 2,026 miles, she landed outside Londonderry, Ireland, becoming the first woman to fly solo across the “pond” and the first person to cross the Atlantic twice by airplane. On this date in 1946 in Kenton, Ohio, Charles Brown, while checking out a book at the public library,  was struck by lightning.  This was the tenth time that he was hit.  “The Almanac of the Infamous, The Incredible and The Ignored” reports that there have been numerous documented human multiple lightning strikes.  A forest ranger from Waynesboro, Virginia was bopped seven times in a thirty six year stretch.  Cleveland Sullivan lost a toenail while on duty in a fire lookout tower in 1942.  In 1969 a bolt scorched his eyebrows and in 1972 and 1973, lightning lit up his hair.  Carl Mize, known also as Sparky, was hit four times, once on the rodeo circuit and another strike put a hole in his shoe.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Quiet Space and a Rising River" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-quiet-space-and-a-rising-river-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-quiet-space-and-a-rising-river-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 18 May 2017 10:41:44 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The tiny town of Green Bank, nestled in the middle of the Allegheny Mountain Range, could be one of the quietest places on Earth. It’s the home of the Green Bank Telescope, operating under the auspices of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In 1958, the Federal Communications Commission created a 13,000-square-mile quiet zone to shield Green Bank’s radio telescopes from man-made interference.  The entire National Radio Quiet Zone borders Virginia and West Virginia and permissible noises include daytime car engines, wind, and thunder.  Cellphones, Wi-fi radio and designated electronics are regulated by Chuck Naday who patrols and protects the largest steerable radio telescope. About half the size of the Statue of Liberty, the radio telescope listens into space, gathering signals originating 14 billion years ago. In closing, with the River reading in Baton Rouge at 37.3 feet, projecting 39.7 feet by Tuesday, it heads to 41 feet by May 26th.  Here's my column from May 18, 2011..."The level of the Mississippi River in Baton Rouge will touch the 44.8 foot mark today.  Our live weathercasts at 6:00 PM since May 5th have checked the levels in Baton Rouge on a “step-by-step” basis.  Step one is the 35 foot flood stage; the 13th or top step at 48.0 feet. Last night we noted that at a level of 44.8’ the water rose between steps nine and ten.  This flooding episode will be logged as the third highest river level preceded by the Great Flood of 1927 at 47.28’ and dual episodes in 1922 and 1945 at 45.18’.  In 1945 the level reached 44.58. With the threat of ‘over-topping” removed from the scenario, the next 45 days will find experts watching for increased seepage and sand boils."


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Pat Shingleton: "Rittenhouse and His Invention..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rittenhouse-and-his-invention-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rittenhouse-and-his-invention-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 17 May 2017 10:33:01 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The Rittenhouse Hygrometer was an 18th century invention that registered the relative humidity of the air by using wood as its sensor. David Rittenhouse created this archaic device to register the expansion and contraction of wood detected through the wood’s grain.  Wood swells and shrinks about 80 times as much around the growth rings and 40 times as much across the rings. His process included taking two identically sized strips of mahogany, glued them together to complete a single slat and attached one end to a base. He then placed a tipped pointer on the other end.  When the humidity rose, the strip swelled, forcing the slat to bend and when it dropped the strip shrank and bent.  Rittenhouse’s invention is still used today by designers of plywood, laminated floors and layered wood to ensure that these products remain flat as they adjust to the power of relative humidity. As wood swells and shrinks it gains or loses water once it is at or below a 30% saturation point. Examples include gaps between floorboards, creaking stairs, trim joints opening up, piano sound boards changing tunes with doors and drawers that once stuck, opening easily.  Of course the process reverses when higher levels of relative humidity restores moisture content to its original levels.  Rittenhouse also made mathematical instruments for surveying and astronomy and in the 1700s invented the Rittenhouse Hygrometer. This weather instrument registers the relative humidity of the air by using wood as its sensor.  The weatherstick was invented in the late 1700s and is still used to forecast the weather. 


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