WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Weather - Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2014, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Fri, 24 Oct 2014 18:10:23 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: Raining, On a Scale of 1 to 10 http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-raining-on-a-scale-of-1-to-10/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-raining-on-a-scale-of-1-to-10/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 23 Oct 2014 11:29:28 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Raining, On a Scale of 1 to 10

On October 23, 1947, a cafe in Marksville was suddenly filled with news that fish were falling from the sky. As noted in an archived column, a biologist for the Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries provided this account: "In an 80,000 square foot area, thousands of freshwater fish, native to local waters, were landing on Main and Monroe streets. The fish were falling in intervals, landing on roofs and in back yards." Marksville's Bank Director, J.M. Barnham discovered hundreds in his yard while his cashier, J.E. Gremillion was clunked on the head with a "hickory shad." Researchers have reviewed the data from this day that recorded mild weather, light breezes but remain stumped as to the cause of the Great Fish Fall in Marksville.


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Pat Shingleton: A Hail of A Blast http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-hail-of-a-blast/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-hail-of-a-blast/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 22 Oct 2014 10:26:03 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: A Hail of A Blast

In 1907 the Italian Royal Academy of Sciences noted that tests of anti-hail cannons weren't effective and urged the government to cease encouraging expensive and useless work. By the early twentieth century, anti-hail cannons disappeared. Replacing them were rockets that would explode 800 grams of dynamite, above the ground, to prevent hail formation. The explosions caused cold core eddies that develop hail to break up. The rockets were in conflict with safety measures designed by civil aviation. In 1972, the French company, Corballan, marketed a new version of the hail cannon and remains the largest manufacturer. The new cannons substitute acetylene for black powder, automatically load and reload and are fired from remote locations.


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A Blast from the Past http://www.wbrz.com/news/a-blast-from-the-past/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/a-blast-from-the-past/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 21 Oct 2014 2:40:07 PM Pat Shingleton A Blast from the Past

Luigi Bombicci, a mineralogist from Bologna, Italy, believed that hail could be prevented. In 1880, his theory of "spherohedron" described the hailstone's process of crystallization and preventing hail development with sound. In 1896, Albert Steiger, Mayor of Windisch-Feistritz, Austria, made the first attempt to defeat hail with the force of sound and did so by using a locomotive smokestack. He packed it with black powder and directed the stack into a thunderstorm. Mayor Steiger professed that hail no longer would fall on his fields and cannons were accepted. Another glance at anti-hail cannon technology in tomorrow's column.


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Pat Shingleton: "Look Out Below!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-look-out-below-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-look-out-below-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 20 Oct 2014 4:00:06 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

It's not unusual for those that reside in the northern extremes and the northeast to experience snowfall at this time of the year. The "changing leaves" were somewhat deterred this year as maples and cottonwoods still offer beautiful displays. Also at this time of the year, forecasts may include a "snow loading alert." This is especially pertinent to pedestrians. Many "walkers" are put under an alert for not only slippery sidewalks but travel under trees. Trees that hold their leaves into November become a "catch-all" for additional atmospheric conditions. A rare, four-inch snowstorm collects on leaves, increasing the branch weight. Adding heavy, wet snow to tree branches can snap power lines, causing injury below, thus the need for a "snow loading alert."


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Pat Shingleton: Why Indian Summer? http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-why-indian-summer-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-why-indian-summer-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 19 Oct 2014 2:34:09 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Why Indian Summer?

In other sections of the United States it is not unusual for a winter weather alert to be issued at this time of the year and many locations are also awaiting their first frost. An extended period of dry, warm days, following a frost,` is common and as noted in a previous column, this describes Indian summer. In Europe, this same weather pattern is called Old Wives' summer, Halcyion days, St. Martin's summer, St. Luke's summer and All-Halloween summer. There are years when Indian Summer doesn't occur while numerous episodes have been reported in other years. My weather diary included an e-mail received, from Marsha Reichle, where she noted that the reason it is called Indian Summer is because it is traditionally followed by Apache fog.


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Pat Shingleton: Hurricanes and Earthquakes http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hurricanes-and-earthquakes/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hurricanes-and-earthquakes/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 18 Oct 2014 2:45:13 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Hurricanes and Earthquakes

Weather anniversaries for October 19 include Hurricane Wilma, blasting the Yucatan with 175 mile-per-hour winds nine years ago. Katrina, Rita, Wilma were the five most intense Atlantic hurricanes, rewriting the record book in other categories. Wilma's eye wall was two nautical miles wide, the smallest on record. Louisiana has also experienced episodes of earthquakes. On this date in 1930 one rattled Napoleonville with effects reported in Allemands, Donaldsonville, Franklin, Morgan City and White Castle. Residents reported overturned objects, shaken trees and cracked plaster. Other area quakes include a magnitude 3.8 reading near Greenville, MS on June 4, 1967. On November 19, 1958, one shook houses and rattled windows in Baton Rouge.


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Pat Shingleton: "Dalibard Was the First..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dalibard-was-the-first-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dalibard-was-the-first-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 17 Oct 2014 4:00:09 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Previous columns have noted Ben Franklin's expertise as an inventor, including his lightning experiments. Franklin was inspired by other inventors, especially French academic, Thomas Dalibard who actually performed the first lightning experiment. Franklin wanted to duplicate Dalibard's experiment and did so from Philadelphia's Christ Church on October 19, 1752. According to his diary, Franklin made a cross of two light sticks, reaching the four corners of a handkerchief. Attached to the top of the stick was a sharp pointed wire, to the end of the twine, silk ribbon and a key. The exact location of Franklin's experiment places it possibly in mid-June in a now vacant lot near the interesection of 18th and Spring streets in Philadelphia.


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pat Shingleton: "A Wash Out..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-wash-out-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-wash-out-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 16 Oct 2014 3:58:28 PM Pat Shingleton pat Shingleton:

King John "Lackland," King Henry's II's favorite son, got his nickname because his father had no land to give him. As noted in a previous column, John, the younger brother of King Richard the Lionhearted, tried to overthrow his brother. Returning from the Crusades in 1194, he forgave his brother but John was condemned by barons because of taxes. In 1215, they presented a resolution, constructing the Magna Carta which he signed but didn't embrace. Retreating from an invasion by Prince Louis of France, he and his entourage crossed the Wash, located in East Anglia. This treacherous mud flat incurred an unusually high tide; washing away his treasures including the crown of jewels. Because of the flood, King John died of dysentery in October 2016.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Direct Hit..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-direct-hit-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-direct-hit-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 15 Oct 2014 3:57:12 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On October 15, 1907, Nicaraguan rebel forces, under the leadership of Gen. Pablo Castilliano, were attempting to overthrow the government. As noted in a previous column, with money, weapons and expertise, government forces were repeatedly beaten by the rebels and on the verge of surrendering. Camped along a ridge overlooking their enemy, the rebels prepared for a final daybreak assault. Castilliano went to his tent to record the day's events when suddenly the camp was aglow. A fireball made a direct hit on Castilliano's tent, leaving a hole ten feet deep and fifteen feet wide with bits of the meteorite scattered throughout the hole. The rebels, believing the meteorite was a sign of displeasure from heaven, retreated, stopping the rebellion.


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Pat Shingleton: "Assisting the Enemy with a Forecast." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-assisting-the-enemy-with-a-forecast-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-assisting-the-enemy-with-a-forecast-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 14 Oct 2014 3:56:49 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

By October 27th, the World Series will include either the Giants, Cardinals, Orioles or Royals. After Pearl Harbor in 1941, the Office of Censorship advised radio stations to omit mentions of weather. It was a voluntary "code" as station managers feared compromising their licenses. Newspapers could only publish the previous day's highs and lows for no more than 20 cities. Descriptions of weather
from the "Lower 48" could have assisted German ships and submarines in the Atlantic. The daily mention of field conditions for a baseball game was acceptable but constraints were placed on "rained-out" games. Announcers were instructed to broadcast "a cancelled event due to weather," "wet grounds" or "muddy fields." No playing ball with the enemy.


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Pat Shingleton: "Putting On A Front..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-putting-on-a-front-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-putting-on-a-front-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 13 Oct 2014 3:48:19 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

After a return to August-like weather a well organized cold front blasted through our state on Monday. Wind damage and investigated reports of tornadoes will be validated today. The destructive nature of this front is also providing a few benefits this week. We're fortunately sliding out of the upper and mid 80s to temperatures in the mid 70s through Wednesday. This front will also shift our winds from the north and provide a nice dry-out through the forecast period. Another benefit of this weather episode is the upper level trough that is advancing well ahead of the cold front. This mechanism will assist in pulling Hurricane Gonzolo away from the eastern seaboard of the United States, bumping it into the Atlantic. Enjoy a taste of Autumn.


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Pat Shingleton: The miracle http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-miracle/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-miracle/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 12 Oct 2014 1:40:03 PM Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux III Pat Shingleton: The miracle

On October 13, 1917, 70,000 people gathered at Fatima, Portugal, to witness a miracle. They testified that the sun became detached from the sky, rolling right and left as if it were falling upon the earth. Lucia Santos and her two cousins Francisco and Jacinta Marto testified that five months earlier the Virgin Mary appeared to the three young children; the only ones to witness her that day. During this solar phenomena Father Ignatius Pereira, then, 9 years-of-age, reported that objects around them reflected colors of the rainbow. Ten minutes later, the sun returned to its original location, without the same brilliance. Monsignor Quareman also reported that white flower petals appeared to be falling and disappearing before landing.


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Pat Shingleton: Columbus wouldn't have liked it http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-columbus-wouldn-t-have-liked-it/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-columbus-wouldn-t-have-liked-it/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 11 Oct 2014 3:24:21 PM Pat Shingleton: Columbus wouldn't have liked it

On the heels of Typhoon Phanfone, Vongfong, meaning "the wasp," will impact Japan. The most intense storm to hit the Pacific Northwest started from the remnants of Typhoon Freda that formed on October 3, 1962. Three successive storms hit the Pacific Northwest over a 30-hour period from October 11-12, 1962. The first postponed the sixth game of the World Series between the Yankees and the San Francisco Giants. A second storm skirted a stretch of coast from California to British Columbia for 15 hours with hurricane force winds. Wind speeds of 173 mph were reported at Cape Blanco while Mount Hebo Air Force Station in Oregon recorded 127 mph. gusts. Property damage registered $200 million, claiming 40 lives, known as the Columbus Day Storm.


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Pat Shingleton: "Ohmm Pa Pa..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ohmm-pa-pa-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ohmm-pa-pa-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 10 Oct 2014 3:50:56 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

For 16 years, Richard and Brenda Netzberger delighted thousands by presenting an authentic Oktoberfest for Baton Rouge. They embraced the tradition of the harvest with Wurstel or sausage, Brezel or pretzels, Reiberdatschi or potato pancakes and Blaukraut or red cabbage. On October 12, 1810, citizens of Munich, Germany, were invited to attend the reception of King Ludwig I to Princess Therese of Saxony. The event was held at the city gates and for 204 years, Oktoberfest is a sixteen-day festival showcasing the harvest. Oktoberfests in our area include: Deutsches Haus in Kenner, Revel in the Madness in Shreveport, Cajun Village Oktoberfest in Sorrento and the Shreveport Oktoberfest. None can compare to Richard and Brenda's "Taste of Bavaria."


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Pat Shingleton: "Bad for Superman, Good for Us..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bad-for-superman-good-for-us-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bad-for-superman-good-for-us-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 9 Oct 2014 4:02:29 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Krypton was bothersome to Superman but is beneficial to scientists. A commonly used method of calculating ancient ice age better understands Earth's climate and past ice ages. For years, carbon dating compared the decay of a radioactive isotope to that of a stable isotope. Carbon -14 is produced by cosmic rays in the ice, providing dating to 50,000 years. The accuracy has been compromised and radiometric Krypton dating has provided promising results. Scientists believe they may soon be able to date ice much older than ever before possibly back 1.5 million years. Krypton atoms are scarce and researchers placed two 750-pound hunks of melting glacier ice into a vacuum chamber. Krypton is stored in air bubbles with hopes of further success.


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Pat Shingleton: "No School Today Kids..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-no-school-today-kids-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-no-school-today-kids-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 8 Oct 2014 3:48:29 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Years ago, kids "missing" school at the start of deer season, in Western Pennsylvania, initiated a "day-off." Many school districts prevent make-up days by planning for snow events. Schools in Mississippi and Alabama have tornado days in place. The deadly tornado that hit Moore, Oklahoma in 2013, took 24 lives, including nine children. Officials in Oklahoma are continuing discussions in cancelling classes when tornado threats are high. This procedure has never been considered, proposed or discussed in another state that rests in the heart of tornado alley. In Kansas, most schools have safe rooms for students and staff when violent weather threatens. Seven rooms are presently under construction to compliment the 77 rooms currently in place.


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Pat Shingleton: "Tweet-Tweet..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-tweet-tweet-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-tweet-tweet-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 7 Oct 2014 4:02:46 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Earth Gauge suggests that highs, lows and frontal passages compliment the movement of migratory birds. The best time for bird watchers is the day after a cold front passes providing northerly winds, dropping temperatures, rising air pressure and clearing skies. The website eBird offers tips for viewing migratory birds and weather with weekly regional migration forecasts and tips on species for our area. The Gulf Coast and Southeast identify a variety birds for ornithologists including: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, White-throated Sparrow, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Marsh and House Wren, Tree Swallow, Palm Warbler, Northern Flicker and Brown Creeper. Grab your, "binocs," wait for a cold front, and enjoy some "birding."


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Pat Shingleton: "Open "Em Up!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-open-em-up-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-open-em-up-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 6 Oct 2014 4:02:36 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Most cars carry one as the umbrella is a needed accessory for us. If comes from the Latin word umbra, meaning shade and was used in ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. As noted in a previous column, the oldest reference in China dates to year 21 CE and the King of Siam in 1687 gifted them to his subjects. Technology has changed the umbrella and 4 years ago Ambient Devices marketed an umbrella alerting the holder of storm. It has a handle that flashes of an approaching shower and collects its data from Accuweather.com. It differentiates between storms, depicting fast flashes to slow flashes for sprinkles. Similar other umbrellas, you must manually raise the battery operated parasol. Your I-Phone and your umbrella do the same.


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Pat Shingleton: Mutton Anyone? http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-mutton-anyone-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-mutton-anyone-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 5 Oct 2014 2:49:52 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Mutton Anyone?

Mobile food canteens have become popular in the Baton Rouge area and have caused problems in China. Smoke from the barbecue stands are a common source of unhealthy airborne particulate matter known as PM2.5. A spokesman from Beijing's Bureau of City Administration and Law Enforcement insists the "stands" not only create serious air pollution but enhance noise pollution for neighborhoods. Unlicensed grill operators were facing fines of up to 5,000 yuan or about $815 and the confiscation of their grilling equipment for discharging smoke and noise. China's microblogging service, Sina Weibo, believes the crackdown was the government's attempt to harass and limit vendors. The most smoke is caused by specific trucks that serve mutton skewers. Yum!


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Pat Shingleton: It Happened Again http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-it-happened-again/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-it-happened-again/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 4 Oct 2014 2:37:54 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: It Happened Again

Saturday's column reviewed the successful prediction of Stephen Saxby on October 4, 1869. It was called "Saxby's Gale" and was based on the position of the moon relative to the Earth. Storm season is underway for the Canadian Maritimes and coastal sections of the northeast. Storms are predicted by the climatology of the region, Saxby's scenario repeated in October 2002 as the Earth and the moon were in a similar configuration with Hurricane Lili. A similar alignment occurred on March 8, 1993. It was titled the East coast "Superstorm" and killed hundreds, produced widespread snowfall and logged record low pressure readings. The system went from the Florida Panhandle through central Massachusetts into Maine in 24 hours.


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