WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2015, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Sat, 28 Feb 2015 19:02:51 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Varooooom!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-varooooom-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-varooooom-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 27 Feb 2015 2:51:41 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

As teenagers, a snowy weekend could send us to a garage. In these locales we observed some of the neighborhood "carburetor heads." These guys could tear down an engine and have it back on the street in no time. My weather segment with the Ramblin' Oldies of Denham Springs brought back some fond memories of painting Ted Bridge's roadster. "Peeling out" on a dry street left skid marks, also known as "burning rubber." "Fish tailing" happened on wet pavement and "drag racing" meant a stiff fine from Officer Bob Hardisky. We knew how to clutch a standard or stick shift. Marty Pavlovic drove an automatic with "Rag Doll" painted on the fender. Between the gas and brake pedals he would replicate having "four-on-the-floor." Enjoy the car show.


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Pat Shingleton: "Bonzai!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bonzai-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bonzai-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 26 Feb 2015 4:07:58 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Japan was spared from the Mongolians of Genghis Khan by a typhoon that destroyed Khan's army. It was named "Kamikaze," after the god of wind, Shinto. As noted in a previous column, as the typhoon saved their ancestors, the Japanese Army in 1937 revived the name during World War II, believing they would be saved in battle. In the dry regions of India and Nepal, Hindus coax showers from the sky. Another example includes a means of resolving a drought in 2002. Similar to a nudist camp, women of western Nepal emptied their villages and gathered in local fields at midnight, in the nude. They also locked their husbands inside their homes and tilled the fields to appease the Hindu god of rain, Lord Indra. Days later, rain fell on the region.


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Pat Shingleton: "Those Weather Words..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-those-weather-words-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-those-weather-words-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 25 Feb 2015 3:53:31 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

I'll update the unofficial weather dictionary with the following items. "Brincles" are underwater icicles. Fire rainbows form when light reflects from ice crystals in high level clouds while white rainbows form in fog, rather than rain. You may have seen fire whirls. They form when intense heat and turbulent wind combine. The Catatumbo River is located in Venezuela and when storm clouds whirl, the result is a rare spectacle known as "Catatumbo Lightning." The storm occurs ten hours per day, 280 times an hour and 160 nights each year. Meanwhile, "Morning Glory Clouds" are incredibly rare, seen only seen in Burketown, Australia. "Frost Flowers" occur when the stem sap of plants freezes, expands and cracks the stem, creating amazing patterns.


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"David-507 Years Old..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/david-507-years-old-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/david-507-years-old-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 24 Feb 2015 4:25:39 PM Pat Shingleton

Thousands visit the Galleria dell' Academia in Florence, Italy each year. They view the 17-foot-tall masterpiece of Michaelangelo Buonarroti's biblical shepherd, known as David. Over the years, weather has advanced the aging of the 506 year-old statue. In 1512, lightning struck its base and in 1527 the left arm was broken during riots against Florence's ruling Medici family. From 1808 through 1815, the statue was coated with wax for weather proofing and later cleaned with steel brushes and an acidic solution. Current repairs include cotton swabs and distilled water, applied on the face to remove contaminants from the body. Experts protect the statue by applying cellulose pulp and clay. In 1991, a vandal smacked David's foot with a hammer.


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Pat Shingleton: "De-Home, De-Mold, Dehumidifier..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-de-home-de-mold-dehumidifier-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-de-home-de-mold-dehumidifier-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 23 Feb 2015 3:48:12 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

I assisted one of our viewers on Monday who was installing a de-humidifier in his camp to eliminate an increase of moisture when he wasn't using it. With hopes that he is reading this morning's column, another treatment is available. Obviously, the best means of preventing mold is controlling moisture and with Spring 24 days away, higher humidity and more moisture can be expected. Air purifiers might be the solution. AirFree is a new purifier that sterilizes the air without the use of a filter, allowing it to flow freely and effectively eliminating dust particles. The system accepts indoor air and uses existing heat to whack airborne particles, allergens, mold spores and microbiological antigens. Clean, sterile air is then returned.


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Pat Shingleton: A Scare While Cutting the Turf http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-scare-while-cutting-the-turf/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-scare-while-cutting-the-turf/ Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 22 Feb 2015 2:30:37 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: A Scare While Cutting the Turf

In Ireland; "if you see the mountains, it's about to rain, if you can't- it's raining." Ivar Quigley, is recognized as a champion turf cutter and often "cut the turf." He would then set it aside to dry in the warm sun as the dry peat is later used as a heat source. Within the fireplace, the "clamp of turf" has a pleasant aroma. On this date in 1968, in Connemara, Steven Coyne, with his family of seven, was collecting peat and noticed a 12 foot long beast with a long, slender neck, no eyes, two snail like antennae, slick, black skin and two humps on its back with a flat tail. In 1954, a Connemara librarian, Belinda Finnegan, sister of Junior, saw a similar creature while fishing with Kevin Kimble, Tim O'Brien and Greg Eaton.


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Pat Shingleton: The Last of the Airships http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-last-of-the-airships/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-last-of-the-airships/ Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 21 Feb 2015 3:19:59 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: The Last of the Airships

May 6, 1937, marked the end of rigid airships when the Hindenburg exploded at Lakehurst, New Jersey. In February, 1935, the U.S.S. Macon completed a training mission near the Santa Barbara Islands in California. South of Point Sur, it experienced squally weather and attempted to avoid a developing storm. Lt. Commander Herbert Wiley ordered a maneuver when a wind gust jarred the airship's top fin. Efforts to control the ship were futile and it plunged to the ocean. Prior to the crash, Wiley gave the order to abandon ship and with life vests and rafts and warm water temperatures, all but two of the 83-member crew survived. Its sister ship, Akron, crashed two years earlier killing 73. One of the survivors was Lt. Commander Wiley.


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"Hackin' and Coughin'" http://www.wbrz.com/news/hackin-and-coughin-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/hackin-and-coughin-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 20 Feb 2015 3:36:54 PM Pat Shingleton

Josh Eachus posted a report recently on evidence related to a cold and cold weather. Researchers believe a modest chill is good for your vascular system. Mom relied on mustard plasters, Vick's Vapo Rub and salt-water gargling to relieve symptoms. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases verify Josh's report that drastic changes in temperature are not responsible for these types of illnesses. Germs are primarily transmitted through direct contact and the Institute determined that people tend to be sick, at this time of year, due to time spent indoors. In an environment of dry, indoor air, viruses thrive and are enhanced by way of direct contact. Colds and flu are prevented by hand washing and a little "chill-out" can assist.


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Pat Shingleton: "Shakin' and Boomin'" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-shakin-and-boomin-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-shakin-and-boomin-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 19 Feb 2015 3:56:47 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

During episodes of hurricanes we may experience the sound of a transformer exploding, loud enough to gain attention. Middle Tennessee residents experienced episodes of loud booms and explosions Wednesday evening. Police and news stations fielded reports from Ashland City, Hermitage, Hohenwald and Nolensville where residents experienced noises that resembled 4th of July cannon fire. Years ago these booms were called "Frost Quakes," and are also referred to as "cryoseismic booms." Typically the freeze-line is 14 inches under the surface, in these areas, however days of record cold has caused mini-explosions. Water running into the ground interacts with the air temperature and rapidly expands. The released pressure causes booms and tremors.


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Pat Shingleton: "Snow Swimming..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-snow-swimming-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-snow-swimming-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 18 Feb 2015 2:57:12 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

During my stint with the NBC affiliate in Pittsburgh, Pa., I created a graphic that identified the number of days without sunshine. If my memory serves me, I believe we logged 53 consecutive days in the clouds. Wintertime diversions included constant trips to the Seven Springs ski resort in addition to other locations for sledding. As you are probably aware, Boston has recorded more snow in February than ever before and a former LSU swimming champion recently decided to break the boredom by swimming in the snow. In a pool, filled with snow, Julius Gloeckner replicated some swimming moves that afforded him numerous honors. With just his bathing suit and swim hat the six-time All American did the freestyle and butterfly in the snow drifts.


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Pat Shingleton: "Getting Through February..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-getting-through-february-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-getting-through-february-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 17 Feb 2015 3:02:45 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Our February chill certainly can't compare to the folks in the Northeast that are anxious to get a thaw out and a meltdown. A couple of years ago, Parade Magazine determined the best accessory for snow playing. Earmuffs, wooly socks or sunglasses? Sunglasses, worn on sunny, wintry days prevent photokeratitis or snow blindness. After taking your dog for a snowy, winter walk, what is the first thing to do when returning home? Wiping down its paws, a blanket rub-down or extra water? In snow episodes, or a cold rain, pets track through melting chemicals and rock salt that cause pad cuts. Paw wiping is always suggested. Finally, how thick should the ice be before you don your skates? Four to five inches of ice can hold 250 pounds of weight.


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Pat Shingleton: "Snow Bound..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-snow-bound-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-snow-bound-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 16 Feb 2015 4:00:16 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Boston's weekend storm broke all the records. Before today, the biggest blizzard in southern New England banged Boston and its coastal areas on February 6, 1978. For the first time in its 106-year-history, the Boston Globe couldn't make deliveries. There was another New England snowstorm that made newspaper headlines. Acts of God-The Old Farmer's Almanac posted in its "Blizzard Hall of Fame." the Great Snow of 1717. This episode was a series of four storms that extended to March 7th with five feet of snow. Newspaper accounts reported that 95 percent of New England's deer population died. With snow fatigue and Seasonal Affected Disorder, a 1600 square foot roof strains to hold 14 tons of snow. Snow "plowers" are also roof "clearers."


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Pat Shingleton: Washington Weather http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-washington-weather/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-washington-weather/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 16 Feb 2015 6:35:53 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Washington Weather

It's President's Day, formerly Washington's Day, recognizing the birthday of our first president in 1732. A review of weather excerpts from his diaries indicates that Washington wasn't a scientific weather observer, as was Thomas Jefferson. His weather interests mirrored his agricultural interests. In writing to his farm manager, William Pearce, on December 22, 1793, he noted the importance of a thermometer at Mount Vernon. His diary notes weather difficulties, including his seasick days during a stormy voyage to Barbados and the cruel winter at Valley Forge. An ill-advised horseback ride during a December storm contributed to his death. His prized weather instrument was the weather vane, remaining in use atop the cupola at Mount Vernon.


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Pat Shingleton: Gassing Up, Could be a Boom http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gassing-up-could-be-a-boom/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gassing-up-could-be-a-boom/ Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 14 Feb 2015 3:14:05 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Gassing Up, Could be a Boom

Static charges occur often in cold, dry weather. If you gas-up this Wednesday you may experience increasing friction while getting in and out of your car, resulting in snaps and cracks of static electricity. As noted in a previous column, motorists dealing with recurring winter weather routinely set the pump handle and are tempted to get back into their car for a quick warm-up before completing the fill-up at the self-serve island. A little warmth could cause an explosion, ignited by static electricity when clothing or hair sparks gasoline vapors causing the flash fire. Regardless of the time of year, motorists should "ground" themselves by touching something metal after exiting their car and especially before they re-touch the pump handle.


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Pat Shingleton: "A 'Bat' Cold" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-bat-cold-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-bat-cold-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 12 Feb 2015 3:33:44 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

WBRZ Channel 2 originated "Baseball at the Box" in 2009 on Friday evenings and will introduce another season of Tiger baseball tonight. We expect the "first-pitch" temperature to be 49 degrees F. My high school years found basketball season ending in February followed by baseball practices in the gymnasium due to the wintry weather. I remember the team snow plowing the parking lot and taking practice with rubber coated baseballs. Coach Ed Ellenich demanded that the wooden bat label "face your face" to prevent cracking. A broken bat constituted laps around the field. A fast pitch connecting to a cold Hillerich and Bradsby bat or a Louisville Slugger, sent a sting through your digits. We called it "bat-sting," also known as "bees in the bat."


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Pat Shingleton: "Sea Fog" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-sea-fog-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-sea-fog-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 11 Feb 2015 3:50:26 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

An area between Hawaii and California has been dubbed the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. The American Institute of Physics reports that researchers have identified five dirty patches in this region. They are located in the middle of large circular currents that attract garbage from other sections of the oceans. Scientists from the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia have constructed models to determine the origination of the debris. The ocean was divided into seven regions where waters don't mix. Their findings indicate that the Pacific and Indian Oceans are linked with the south Atlantic, while another region of the Indian Ocean belongs in the South Pacific. Studying these ocean links can further understand ocean ecology.


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Pat Shingleton: "Let the Sun Shine"+ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-let-the-sun-shine-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-let-the-sun-shine-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 10 Feb 2015 3:58:41 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The world's largest solar plant is open and on-line in the California desert. The 550-megawatt solar project is located in Desert Center, California, adjacent to the Joshua Tree National Park. Constructed by First Solar, it cranks-out enough electricity to power 160,000 average homes. The project received a federal loan of $1.5 billion with critics posting reminders of the U.S. Interior Department's $535 million loan guarantee for Solyndra, a solar panel manufacturer that went bankrupt in 2011. The solar power will be distributed to Southern California Edison and Pacific Gas & Electric Company. An additional 17 solar photovoltaic projects are planned as there are no traditional solar farms larger than 100 megawatts in the United States.


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Pat Shingleton: "Edwin Got Zapped..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-edwin-got-zapped-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-edwin-got-zapped-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 9 Feb 2015 3:55:30 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In February, 1971, Edwin Robinson of Falmouth, Maine, jackknifed his truck on an icy overpass. He suffered severe damage to the occipital area of his brain and gradually lost his eyesight. With his hearing also impaired, for the next nine years, he learned Braille. While in his yard on June 4, 1980, he attempted to "cluck" his pet chicken inside when a lightning bolt knocked him to the ground. Unconscious for 20 minutes he struggled inside and upon awakening from a nap went to his kitchen and read an inscription on a plaque and identified the time on a clock. Two days later his sight was restored and after additional examinations, he was cured. In addition to his returning eyesight, his hearing was restored. The chicken didn't make it.


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Pat Shingleton: Gossip, Ps and Qs http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gossip-ps-and-qs/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gossip-ps-and-qs/ Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 8 Feb 2015 2:57:21 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Gossip, Ps and Qs

In the "early" days, taverns and public houses or pubs provided lodging from inclement weather along with food and drink. As noted in a previous column, libations were also a convenient means of combating the chill and a "wee nip" could break the bone-chilling cold. For politicians, a journey was tedious as they would order their assistants to gauge constituent's opinions. They were instructed to "quaff ale" and catalog the people's concerns. When they would "go sip here" and "go sip there" the two words were combined, forming the term "gossip." Ale would be served in pints and quarts. A bar maid needed to be diligent as to which patrons were drinking a pint or a quart. This duty resulted in the phrase, "minding your ‘P's' and ‘Q's."


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Pat Shingleton: This Stuff Is for the Birds! http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-this-stuff-is-for-the-birds-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-this-stuff-is-for-the-birds-/ Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 7 Feb 2015 3:01:29 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: This Stuff Is for the Birds!

Yorkshire pudding is made with eggs, flour and milk. The batter is whipped or blended and placed on greased pans that many years ago were lined with suet. Suet is beef or mutton fat that collects around the loins and kidneys. My Dad was a butcher and in January Mom would request portions of suet for birds when the temperatures plummeted. Due to its high energy content, suet was also used by cold weather explorers to supplement high daily energy requirements needed in extreme cold. Often suet was added to food rations to assist dog-sled traveling. When my grandfather laced the suet to a Maple tree, woodpeckers, cardinals, wrens and starlings invaded the mesh. Neighborhood dogs enjoyed it too if winter storm winds blew it from the tree.


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