WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2018, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Tue, 24 Apr 2018 HH:04:ss GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Seasonal Twisters..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-seasonal-twisters-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-seasonal-twisters-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 23 Apr 2018 10:50:03 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

We unfortunately remember the tragic  outbreak of tornadoes that leveled a trailer park in Convent, Louisiana on February 23rd and 24th, 2016. April is traditionally the month for tornadoes and April 3rd and 4th, 1974, is still recognized as one of the most active 24-hour periods for twisters in American history. There are two "alleys" that statistically receive the most twister activity. Tornado Alley incorporates Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska Iowa and Missouri.  Replacing Tornado Alley as the leader in tornadoes is Dixie Alley.  This area incorporates nine states including Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee.  The 1974 episode was identified as the "Super Outbreak," covering more than 490,000 square and destroying more than 600 square miles within three major squall lines. The death toll from this outbreak was 315 within eleven states with more than $500 million in damage. Xenia, Ohio was hardest hit with 34 deaths. Another episode was registered on April 5th and 6th, 1936, noted back then as the second deadliest outbreak on record. From Tupelo, Mississippi to the western Carolinas, 17 twisters caused 216 fatalities with $18 million in damage. Two other incidents occurred on April 11th and 12th, 1965 and April 24th and 25th, 1908. During the 1965 episode, 51 tornadoes took 256 lives and the 1908 incident reported 18 tornadoes from Louisiana to Georgia with 310 deaths. One of the longest and deadliest tornadoes traveled 158 miles from Weiss, Louisiana to Winchester, Mississippi. 


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Pass the Salt..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-pass-the-salt--107591/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-pass-the-salt--107591/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 20 Apr 2018 10:26:30 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Salt farming depends on the weather and for French artisan farmers it’s a time tested labor of love. A combination of abundant sunshine, heating the land and persistent wind creates a surface high tide in Guerande, France. Clockwise circulation from the high enhances an area of marshy meadows, also known as the “Cote Sauvage.” Europeans have harvested salt from the earth and in this location since the ninth century.  Salt farmers, also known as paludiers use the same technique and the same tools to collect this caviar of salt. The collection process begins with a wooden gate that traps the sea water into the marsh. When the correct amount of water flows at the correct rate, a maze of clay walls promotes slow evaporation. After a month, the water seeps into shallow pools and salt appears. Paludiers then collect the gourmet of all salts for use in renowned restaurants worldwide. Seepage leads to shallow pools and the appearance of the salt. Salt farmers use a tool that resembles a swimming pool skimmer to gently drag what looks like a lattice of thin ice into a wicker basket.  After skimming the top, the evaporation process continues, leaving the clay-bottomed basin loaded with coarse, grey salt. Natural salt is less acidic and less sharp than industrial salts and with good weather, the paludier’s can harvest of 60 tons of salt.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Francis' Folly..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-francis-folly--107549/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-francis-folly--107549/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 19 Apr 2018 9:53:00 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The chief engineer chief engineer for Lowell, MA, James Bicheno Francis, constructed a five-mile system of canals in 1848. The Merrimack River provided an uninterrupted source of power to a dozen textile mills. Changes in the river level were controlled by a system of gates and locks. He compiled a history of floods and during a major flood in 1785, the river crested above Pawtucket Falls at 13 feet 6 inches. With the city 30 feet lower than the falls, Francis realized that if crest levels repeated then surging water would funnel through the canals, destroying the heart of the city. He proposed building a massive gate to prevent a tragedy, deflecting flood waters. The project included a gate that would drop and close off feeder canals to the Merrimack River, similar to gates used to defend castles in medieval Europe.  Contemporaries ridiculed the idea but in April, 1852, the Merrimack was on-the-rise and Francis decided to lower the gate for the first time. On April 22, 1852, the river crested higher than the flood of 1785 and the gate, snug in granite, held fast. The massive gate worked and 24 hours later, a second, 28-foot wall of water, bombarded the gate. Once again it held. For more than 160 years, "Francis's Folly" is still used.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Fog Events..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-fog-events-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-fog-events-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 18 Apr 2018 10:26:23 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

April is noted for showers and also represents the foggiest month for South Louisiana. On this date in 1952 the tankers Esso Suez and Esso Greensboro collided in dense fog, 200 miles south of Morgan City. The Suez incurred a 20-foot bow gash with both ships bursting into flames. River pilots are trained to navigate during episodes of dense fog not only on the rivers but within simulators that replicate a variety of rough weather scenarios. Included within the scenarios are river levels and snow melt that increases those levels. Fog was the reason for a horrible disaster recognized as the worst aviation accident in history.  Two Boeing 747s collided on the runway in the Canary Islands in 1977, killing 582. On July 25, 1956, the Andrea Doria sank after colliding with the Stockholm in dense fog, 45 miles south of Nantucket Light taking 51 lives.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "A Concrete Idea..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-concrete-idea--107474/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-concrete-idea--107474/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 17 Apr 2018 10:29:33 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On this date, 89 years ago the Great Flood of Louisiana implemented the existing levee system. Imperfect engineering and shoddy construction caused the collapse of dams, such as the Johnstown Flood of 1889.  On May 16, 1874, 138 people died as a result of poor construction and a dam break in Williamsburg, MA.  On March 12, 1928, the St. Francis Dam, in service less than two years, collapsed near Santa Paula, CA, killing 450. February 26, 1972, two coal slag dams along Buffalo Creek in southern West Virginia broke, unloading two miles of backed-up water into a lower dam that exploded, 4,000 homes were washed away with 125 deaths.  June 5, 1976, the 305-foot Teton Dam in Idaho collapsed, released 80 billion gallons of water into adjoining farmland. It takes concrete to build levees and dams. Water is the most widely used material and second on the list is concrete and next to steel, concrete is the strongest material ever manufactured. Concrete cannot be fully recycled however a resurrected solution includes the use of lightning.  Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics in Holzkirchen, Germany revived a method, developed by Russian scientists in the 1940s, called electrodynamic fragmentation.  The problem with recycling concrete is breaking down cement, water, and aggregate or the mixture of stone particles that consist of gravel and limestone grit.  The process includes placing concrete in water then blasting it with a 150-nanosecond bolt of lightning.  The bolt runs through solid material, creating a small explosion then tearing apart and breaking down its components. The fragmentation plant processes one ton of concrete waste per hour with larger volumes expected in the future. 


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Titanic and Titanian..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-titanic-and-titanian-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-titanic-and-titanian-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 16 Apr 2018 10:52:41 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Here's a mention from The Almanac of The Infamous, The Incredible, and Ignored. On April 14, 1912, before the Titanic hit an iceberg, Rev. Charles Morgan of Winnipeg fell into a fitful sleep filled with frantic voices and crashing waves. He heard the hymn, “For Those in Peril on the Sea.” Morgan shared his nightmare with his congregation, leading them in singing the hymn. News of the disaster reached Winnipeg the next morning.  On April 14, 1935, William Reeves, a lookout on a steamer from England to Canada, sensed danger, realizing it was the anniversary of the Titanic disaster, 23 years earlier. Sounding the alarm, the ship stopped, surrounded by ice bergs. The name of the ship was the “Titanian.”


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Timing Lightning and the Titanic..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-timing-lightning-and-the-titanic-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-timing-lightning-and-the-titanic-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 12 Apr 2018 10:27:12 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:


Saturday afternoon and evening could pose hearing problems for our pets.  Claps of thunder are produced when the intense heat and lightning causes the air to expand.  This sends a vibrating pressure or shock wave outward at the speed of sound.  When a person, or a dog, is near a stroke of lightning, thunder is heard as a single sharp crack.  At a distance, thunder can be heard as a continuous rumble as the sound waves move away from random points along the lightning stroke.   If you count the seconds between the flash of lightning and the sound of thunder and divide that by 5, you will calculate, from your location, the approximate number of miles where the thunderclap occurred. On April 12, 106 years ago at  11:40 PM, the Titanic sank. Weather was never considered in the early stages of the investigation.  Weatherwise Magazine's research noted that weather patterns in the winter and early spring of 1911-1912 were to blame for the ship’s demise. Changes in atmospheric pressure at sea level caused strong north winds that propelled the icebergs farther south than normal, placing them into the Titanic’s course. Iceberg season in the north Atlantic is April through July where more than 80 percent of the total number of icebergs cross south of latitude 48 north. In April, 1912, more than 900 icebergs floated in the North Atlantic.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "April Events and Bug Catching..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-april-events-and-bug-catching-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-april-events-and-bug-catching-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 11 Apr 2018 10:34:08 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On this date in 1925 remnants of a limestone ball shattered near Bleckenstad, Sweden.  Researchers at Lund University found fossilized marine shells and particles of an animal resembling a trilobite in the debris.  On April 11, 1983, a 100-pound block of ice smashed onto the pavement in Wuxi, China. “The Almanac of the Infamous, the Incredible and the Ignored” reports that icefalls have been noted for hundreds of years.  In the late 1700s, an elephant sized ice block fell in Seringapatam, India and in 1849 a thousand pound ice chunk clunked a farm in Ord, Scotland.  Also in Scotland in 1950, 112 pounds of ice were collected in Dumbarton. In Hartford, Connecticut in 1985 a 1,500 pound sheet of ice 6 feet long crashed into a fence. The late, Bob Fredericks was our high school biology teacher and a good one he was… Our advanced biology class included an assignment of collecting 50 species of insects and 50 different species of wild flowers.  Butterfly nets were provided along with a “Ball” jar laced with formaldehyde to “prepare” the bugs. Darryl Smialek made the task easier by putting the top down on his convertible as we motored through the valleys with eight nets protruding from the car.  This month, the U.S. Forest Service will release their wildflower map, identifying hundreds of locations, on national forests, for prime wildflower viewing. The map includes 317 wildflower viewing areas on National Forest System lands, referenced by state. Their website also includes more than 10,000 plant images.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Flying Checks and the Roller..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-flying-checks-and-the-roller-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-flying-checks-and-the-roller-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 10 Apr 2018 6:34:43 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On April 11, 1991 a canceled check was sucked up by tornado in Stockton, Kansas.  It was carried 223 miles to Robert Melcher’s farm near Winnetoon, Nebraska. Years ago, John Knox, an associate professor of geography at the University of Georgia, conducted research on how debris is carried by twisters to better understand the intricacies of this weather phenomenon. Knox and his students categorized items by weight such as a Hackleburg, Alabama high school cheer leading jacket that flew 66 miles to Elkmont, Alabama, during a tornado outbreak. On April 27, 2011, more than 120 tornadoes caused 300 deaths across the South and retrieved items were compared to the direction of the storms.  Regardless of weight, researchers determined that most of the debris fell slightly left of the storm’s track. I reminisced recently after smelling fresh, cut grass. It reminded me of our residence in Western Pennsylvania. Until our mom's death, her property was maintained with a Spring and Fall leaf clean-up and regular cutting through the spring and summer. Most lawns in that section of the country incur damage from the winter weather and her property can be damaged due to access to her back door. I vividly remember her mentioning, "Patrick, there's lots of 'ruts' in the yard but we can get out the 'roller' to mend those." Imagine a 3-foot-long cement tube, 2 feet in diameter. Stick a pipe in it, fill it with concrete, attach a metal brace to the pipe, encased cement. Finish the construction by attaching a 5 foot 2 by 4 to the brace with a horizontal handle to push and pull the roller. This was constructed in the 1920s and was always propped against our garage and used by our father, grandfather, and us.... to "roll the yard." The roller worked and caused numerous hernias.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Wave Energy and Nano-Seconds..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wave-energy-and-nano-seconds-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wave-energy-and-nano-seconds-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 9 Apr 2018 10:30:52 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Years ago, The Electric Power Research Institute, a non-profit organization based in Palo Alto, CA, predicted that wave energy could someday fulfill 7 percent of the country’s current electricity demand.  That percentage represents the same amount of energy produced by hydroelectric dams in the United States.  Wave energy converters harness wave motion to generate electricity and are installed either on the sea floor or as floating buoys offshore. The buoys are unseen from the land and do not disrupt the environment. Since 2003, Europe embraced wave systems with projects currently in place in Hawaii, California, Washington, Rhode Island and Oregon. Ocean Power Technologies in New Jersey installed 50-ton buoys to power 50,000 homes. Imagine wave motion devices on the bottom of the fastest moving tributary in North America - the Mississippi and on abandoned  oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico.  In closing, during the first part of the twentieth, the time resolution in lightning research was measured in milliseconds.  Today, a sample lightning strike can be captured every 10 nanoseconds or faster. A nanosecond is one-billionth of a second, providing billions of data points with a single strike. This data reveals two of lightning's remaining mysteries: how it begins in the clouds and how it attaches to the ground. Scientists are learning more about the stepped leader or the beginning of the cloud-to-ground discharge. What they don't know is exactly where or when lightning begins in the clouds and how it attaches to the ground.  Ben Franklin's goal for the understanding of lightning was providing safety against one of nature's most astonishing and powerful displays. The National Lightning Detection Network currently uses more than 800 antenna stations to record the time, polarity and signal strength of cloud-to-ground events across the United States.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Ben and the Kite..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ben-and-the-kite-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ben-and-the-kite-/ Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 7 Apr 2018 1:02:50 AM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

With massive lightning hits in the northern sections of the state yesterday afternoon and a Kite Festival in Port Allen today and Sunday, possibly this column is appropriate... Benjamin Franklin invented pot belly stoves, bifocals and composed witty proverbs. His lighting experiments originally had nothing to do with the use of a kite. His first experiment suggested whether electricity and lightning had exact characteristics. In order to test whether the clouds were electrified, he proposed placing a sentry box on top of a high tower, large enough to hold a man.  He suggested elevating and pointing an iron rod 20 to 30 feet into the low, storm clouds with a man standing on the floor of the box holding a loop of wire. Franklin never performed the experiment, but French academic Thomas Daliband did in May of 1752. He placed a 40-foot iron rod on top of a wooden pallet, insulated from the ground with wine bottles. A storm approached, the brass wires were connected to the tower and sparks flew from the rod. His tests were based upon Franklin's "iron-rod" teachings.  Franklin wanted to duplicate the French experiment from Philadelphia's Christ Church on October 19, 1752.  Three years earlier, physicist Alexander Wilson raised a train of kites 3,000 feet to conduct temperature soundings.  According to notes from his diary, Franklin made a small cross of two light sticks, reaching the four corners of a handkerchief.  Attached to the top of the stick was a sharp pointed wire, to the end of the twine, silk ribbon and the famous key. His diary indicated that "the lightning will be demonstrated and stream plentifully to ones knuckle." The exact location of Franklin's experiment places it possibly in mid-June in a now vacant lot near the intersection of Eighteenth and Spring Streets in Philadelphia.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Kiting and Rainbows..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-kiting-and-rainbows-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-kiting-and-rainbows-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 5 Apr 2018 10:28:04 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

A trip to the beach includes launching the kite.  Aerodynamic design innovations have furthered kite flying to new “heights” that include multiple line maneuvering. The kite was first constructed in China, 2800 years ago, using silk and bamboo for a lightweight yet strong framework.  In my early years, Nick Sudano's dad would construct our kites using sections of the Ellwood City Ledger glued to strips of balsa wood with a long tail for additional stability.  March and April were perfect for kites as strong cold fronts provided northwest winds that kept our kites aloft for hours. Today from 10 AM ‘til 6 PM the 14th Annual Kite Fest Louisiane’ is “soaring” at the West Baton Rouge Soccer Complex. Champion “kiters” will choreograph the flying to music. We're expecting a few showers for Saturday mornings Kite Fest with rapid clearing into the afternoon.  As we move through April and enter the “rainbow season,” scientists have determined that the rainbow we enjoy is a combination of the reflection and refraction of light from millions of raindrops. Aristotle observed that all rainbows form at a 42-degree angle from an imaginary line extending from the sun through an observer's head.  In 1637, French philosopher Rene Descartes theorized that sunlight is bent upon entering a droplet, reflects from the back of the drop and bends as it exits. Rainbows rely on the movement of the raindrops, the sun, and the location of the observer so no two people ever see the same rainbow.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Augusta National..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-augusta-national-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-augusta-national-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 4 Apr 2018 10:47:03 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

From 1943 until late 1944, Augusta National, home of The Masters, was closed for play and transformed back into a farm to help the war effort. German prisoners of war provided the renovation work to erect the famous bridge over Rae’s Creek. Dwight D. Eisenhower , Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe, became a member of Augusta and one remaining landmark bears his name – the Eisenhower Cabin.  The other landmark was a lob lolly pine 210 yards from the tee, on the left side of number 17. Ike hated this tree because his low draw compromised his second shot. In February of 2013, an ice storm  toppled the 125 year old pine and it wasn’t replaced. “Ike” had another tree named after him in 1946 at the Dalmeny Golf Club in Scotland.  Captains from Dalmeny forwarded an acorn from that tree to replant the Eisenhower tree at Augusta that is now five years young. Each side of Magnolia Lane, the entrance to August National has 61 Magnolia Trees that create a “tunnel canopy” to the facility. Eleven years ago, my son Michael and I attended the Saturday and Sunday rounds of The Masters.  In 2005, my son, Mike and I enjoyed The Masters. Our friend Paddy Quigley provided needed guidance that included an early placement of our portable chairs on number 18 while walking the course to enjoy play. We celebrated the playoff rounds between Tiger Woods and Chris Demarco as the navigated between #18 and #10 in a sudden-death playoff. Augusta National embraces tree reforestation, tree mulching programs and a radar system that conserves water and reduces runoff. The parking area is unpaved to accentuate natural absorption and a habitat for ground-nesting birds.  A wildlife habitat is located to the left of number 11. As Mike and I enjoyed our club sandwich we heard the sound of a jet engine. A periodic shower necessitated the initiation of a giant suction device, under each green, that rapidly removes standing water and furthers drying.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Gravity Waves..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gravity-waves-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gravity-waves-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 3 Apr 2018 9:43:42 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

When you toss a stone or pebble into University Lakes it changes the relative calm waters into a ripple with a series of waves extending outward from the pebble drop.  This same scenario often occurs in the atmosphere when a cold front, similar to the one moving through the area this morning, replicates the pebble by hitting a pocket of stationary air.  Once this occurs with incredible force the ripple-reaction creates a series of gusty wind waves that ultimately hit the ground.  These are called gravitational waves or gravity waves.  They traditionally last about fifteen to twenty minutes and depending upon your location they strike the ground with incredible force. Gravity waves can eject wind gust in excess of 60 miles-per-hour with a punch of strong showers and thundershowers occurring thereafter. As of this writing we are not expecting straight-line winds, micro-bursts or gravity waves with this episode of thundershowers.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "The Passover Moon, The Easter Egg..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-passover-moon-the-easter-egg-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-passover-moon-the-easter-egg-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 29 Mar 2018 10:30:57 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Passover begins at sunset this evening - 7:23 P.M. The official “full” moon will be recorded Saturday evening. Astronomers determine a full moon by calculating the percentage of illumination as tonight’s full moon will have 98.6% illumination. One school of thought suggests "light" was needed for the Israelites to leave Egypt, in darkness, and continue their journey out of bondage. Guiding them was a full moon, referred to as the Passover Moon. Easter is calculated as the first Sunday after the paschal full moon or after the vernal equinox which began on March 20th. Moon phase is a time-tested component when Easter occurs during the Liturgical year. Lent began 44 days ago and Easter can fall anywhere between March 22 and April 25. Also of interest, Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches originated the Easter tradition of coloring hard boiled eggs. This tradition represents eggs that are dyed red to represent the blood of Christ, shed on the Cross and the hard shell of the egg symbolized the sealed Tomb of Christ.  The cracking of the hard egg symbolizes Christ’s resurrection from the dead. Our Easter egg hunts in Western Pennsylvania were held regardless of the weather.  It wasn’t unusual to find a colored egg plugged in a pocket of mud. A review of our picture albums and scrapbooks showed my Great-Aunt, Catherine, who shared holidays with us, sitting next to the dining room window with snow drifts outside on Easter Sunday. Those snow drifts held the Easter eggs that we later found after the spring thaw. 


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Parting the Seas and Wind-Set-Down" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-parting-the-seas-and-wind-set-down-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-parting-the-seas-and-wind-set-down-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 28 Mar 2018 10:30:25 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

“Wind setdown” occurs when strong winds blow over water for an extended period of time, shifting the water body downward. This shift causes a low-angle tilt and the upwind, shore water level drops. “As the sun sank over the Nile Delta, a man stood on-shore… raising his rod as a howling wind blew from the east. In the morning the sea was gone, blown to the west whereby people were permitted to walk upon dry ground where the day before fish swam and boats sailed.” The man was not Moses, as described in Exodus 14, but Major-General Sir Alexander B. Tulloch, holding a surveyor’s rod, not a staff, in 1882. Years ago, on the western end of Lake Erie, “wind setdown” events dropped the lake by 2 meters.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "The Fig Tree..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-fig-tree-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-fig-tree-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 27 Mar 2018 10:47:25 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

You may remember the parable of the Roman general questioning an old man and his efforts in planting a fig tree. The general contends that it will take twenty years for the tree to give fruit suggesting that the old Jewish man will be dead by then. So notes the old man, "When I was a small child, I could eat fruit because those who came before me planted trees. Am I not obliged to do the same for the next generation?" This Midrash tale was presented in "ritualwell" and showcases the unique nature of the fig tree with many varieties available in South Louisiana. To compliment the planting there are Jewish traditions that involve the shoveling of dirt at the graveside to signify an end of physical life while a shovelful on a fig tree signifies the beginning of life through the gift of memory and sharing the telling of stories. This tradition continues as the Jewish National Fund encourages tree planting and the revitalization of forests in Israel by honoring those in the congregation. You may have noticed many synagogues displaying "trees of life." The leaves further acknowledge the names of past and present members and their families. More on the fig tree is referenced during this Holy Week and Jesus' travels from Jerusalem to Bethany. Expecting to find some juicy figs, the tree had no fruit, thus the parable when he cursed the tree. The fruit of the fig tree actually appears before the leaves and in Jerusalem, depending upon climate and conditions, it is possible that a tree might produce fruit ten out of twelve months.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Creating Clouds and Rhubarb..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-creating-clouds-and-rhubarb-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-creating-clouds-and-rhubarb-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 26 Mar 2018 10:52:50 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Before we creep into the peppery weather patterns of late May and early June, here’s a suggestion for the teachers. It’s a great time of the year to investigate the different types of clouds, what they are and where they originate.  A cloud identification chart is available on the Internet and charting the daily cloud patterns provides an excellent assignment. You can also make your own cloud.  Items needed are an empty, two-liter bottle, hot water, and a match.  Pour about an inch of hot, boiling water into the bottle.  Light the match, blow it out and drop it into the bottle.  Re-cap the bottle and shake it.  Finally, squeeze the bottle and release it.  When you stop squeezing, the pressure inside the bottle falls and replicates the drop in atmospheric pressure before a storm.  The smoke gives the drops of water a place to land and this experiment creates a cloud. In closing, like many, there are occasions when I miss my Mom. I thought her last weekend while preparing patio pots for summer vegetables. In Pennsylvania, my grandfather would “turn-over” the garden with a shovel until he was convinced to let Mr. Hollenbeck “disc it up” with his tractor. Mom would prepare for one of her first crops of the season – rhubarb, followed by leaf lettuce, beans, tomatoes and sweet corn that should be “knee high by the Fourth of July.”  She removed ground cover from her rhubarb and each year had a bumper crop. At one time, she was the sole provider of rhubarb for the produce manager at the local Giant Eagle, paying “six bucks per pound.”  Sylvia Weatherspoon verifies her rhubarb pie with strawberries is the absolute best. 


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Coming Up To Bats..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-coming-up-to-bats-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-coming-up-to-bats-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 22 Mar 2018 10:33:33 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

 Wind farms not only generate power but assist in long term environmental benefits.  The Journal of Wildlife Management reported that bats suffer from the benefits of wind turbines, primarily in Canada.  Researchers from Barclay-Baerwald discovered that most of the migratory bats in southern Alberta were killed by a decrease in atmospheric pressure caused by the rotation that occurs near the blades.  The speed of the blades impacts the bats’ lungs.  Biology professors at the University of Calgary reported that bats are more likely to fly when turbine speeds are relatively low. To reduce the fatalities without compromising energy  researchers successfully slowed the blades on 38 energy-producing turbines during low-wind periods. During peak wind periods that reap the most energy, bats don’t fly. 


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "The Yolk is On Me..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-yolk-is-on-me-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-yolk-is-on-me-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 21 Mar 2018 10:31:04 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

I was recuperating from "parade mode" Monday and Tuesday, unable to welcome "Spring' on-the-air. Years ago I would advance the old ”raw egg trick" on the first day of spring. During the weather cast, I would amaze the co-anchors by gently standing an egg on-end, believing that it was successful only on the first days of spring.  I would also encourage viewers to do the same. My files included numerous pictures and letters of egg-standing success stories. After many years of presenting this experiment, surprisingly the "yolk" was on me. The Science Alliance verifies experiments, ascertaining their merit and scientific value. They determined that no astronomical reason exists for balancing an egg and is a feat that can be accomplished on any day of the year, depending on the egg.  By the way, hard-boiled eggs work best, gently cracking the end provides a better base.


Permalink| Comments


]]>