WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Weather - Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2014, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Sat, 22 Nov 2014 16:11:53 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "A Weatherman-Snow Stuck" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-weatherman-snow-stuck-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-weatherman-snow-stuck-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 21 Nov 2014 3:54:03 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

From 1979 through 1981, I commuted to Pittsburgh from Baton Rouge every week. I "returned home" to showcase the weather on WPXI, the NBC affiliate. My wife Mabyn, remained at "home," here in Baton Rouge. On one Monday morning I landed in Pittsburgh with snow falling at a rapid rate. By the time I reached my car and began the customary trip from the airport to the Northside of town, snowfall increased at a rapid rate. The normal drive time of 25 minutes was compromised as the parkway into the Fort Pitt tubes was locked-up in traffic. In just a few hours the November 22nd snow event found a seven inch accumulation. My morning wardrobe included shorts and a golf shirt. With my car stuck in snow, I was greeted by the floor crew with laughter.


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Pat Shingleton: "It's in the Water and Trees..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-it-s-in-the-water-and-trees-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-it-s-in-the-water-and-trees-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 18 Nov 2014 2:48:00 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

When Thomas Jefferson was Governor of Virginia, he designated 60 acres of land in Bourbon County, Kentucky for farming. Pioneers were instructed to build a permanent structure to raise, store and export "native corn." Corn was too perishable and bulky for transporting. Families consumed limited amounts of it so ingenious farmer's utilized Kentucky's resources of water, climate and white oak trees to create Kentucky Bourbon. As noted in a previous column, a manufacturing boom in Kentucky continues to break records and create jobs. Production of bourbon has increased 29% with more bourbon in Kentucky than people and the secret to the demand is overseas sales. Similar to Baton Rouge, Kentucky's iron-free water makes the best bourbon.


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Pat Shingleton: "Before UFO's..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-before-ufo-s-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-before-ufo-s-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 17 Nov 2014 3:54:42 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

During the very early days of air travel, unidentified flying objects were not referenced when folks looked to the skies. On November 17, 1896, hundreds in Sacramento watched three lights, illuminating a dark and stormy sky. The unusual object traveled 350 yards as it skirted rooftops. Five days later the object took a half-hour to cross another town where spectators claimed to have seen two men peddling a bicycle-type frame, attached to the object. Later that night the object was sighted above San Francisco as it was witnessed by thousands. The airship cruised above the Cliff House, identified by a searchlight. Numerous sightings of airships were reported until May, 1897. It was the Mongolfier borthers who began flight ballons in 1783.


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Pat Shingleton: 'A Quack Up...' http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-quack-up-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-quack-up-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 14 Nov 2014 4:24:29 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: 'A Quack Up...'

It's opening day of Duck Season for the Coast and West Zones. Luke Guarisco holds the title as champion duck caller for Avoca and Pecan Island Duck Clubs. Along with the Duck Dynasty stars, Austin McCullough and Hayes Alexander, Luke judges callers. Geese fly in a "V" formation to provide 80% greater range than flying solo. Flying out of formation causes resistance drag. Geese return to take advantage of lift from the lead bird. When a lead goose tires, it rotates to the rear and another assumes the point position. Geese in the rear honk to encourage those ahead to maintain speed. If one is wounded or incurs a malady, two geese leave the formation to provide assistance. Leaving to aid others, they stay until death or on a return flight.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-wreck-of-the-edmund-fitzgerald-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-wreck-of-the-edmund-fitzgerald-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 13 Nov 2014 3:55:22 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The Great Lakes can be treacherous at anytime of the year, but especially in November. An example is November 10, 1975 and a powerful storm that sank the cargo ship, Edmund Fitzgerald. It was the theme of a song by Gordon Lightfoot as the storm claimed the lives of 29 crew members. Researchers examine conditions of storms to recreate historical weather events. Scientists at The University of Wisconsin-Madison collected weather data from that day, constructing a model that replicated the Edmund Fitzgerald's demise. In 2012, this data was ingested into a model that matched conditions to the day and targeted time frames of the disaster. The study presented all aspects of the voyage from the time it left port until it sank in Lake Superior.


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Pat Shingelton: "Tree Tapping..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingelton-tree-tapping-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingelton-tree-tapping-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 12 Nov 2014 3:59:38 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingelton:

With the sugar cane harvest completed, the production of molasses will continue. The Mancivalano family operates the Adams Farm in southern Vermont. Since 1865 the farm has included a dairy, timber production and the construction of sap tanks. The mainstay of the farm is its production of maple syrup. Ideal tree tapping includes cold nights and 50-degree days that causes the "sap to run." Should freezing nights be followed by warming days, early tapping will cause a tree scab, preventing the sap from running. Tapping season runs from mid-March through mid-April when 3,500 taps are placed on 2,000 trees. For the Adams farm this represents five percent of the harvested sap. A quart of sap for each tap translates to 800 gallons of syrup.


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Pat Shingleton: "An Outdoor Message" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-outdoor-message-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-outdoor-message-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 11 Nov 2014 3:33:09 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The folks at Lamar Outdoor Advertising may want to consider the actions of researchers in Peru. Peru's University of Engineering and Technology tested billboards that scrub air pollution and convert it to clean air. The billboards use an air filtration system that uses water to cleanse the dirty air by trapping pollutants in the water. This process allows pristine air to be emitted back into the atmosphere. Lima is recognized by the World Meteorological Organization as the city with the highest pollution levels in South America. A single billboard can purify 100,000 cubic meters of air per day which replicates the air-cleaning capacity of 1,200 mature trees. By absorbing harmful dust, the boards can clean a radius of five city blocks.


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Pat Shingleton: "Battlefield Forecasting..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-battlefield-forecasting-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-battlefield-forecasting-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 10 Nov 2014 3:53:56 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In this morning's Advocate there will be examples of veterans that have served, sacrificed and embraced their duty for our country. It is celebrated on the same day as the signing of the Armistice, ending World War I at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. Sverre Pettersen championed the effort, against monumental opposition, to postpone the D-Day invasion until June 6. His forecast averted a potential disaster caused by landing in high winds and waves. The gale-force winds on June 5 subsided enough to initiate the landing. As noted in a previous column, there are additional accounts in his book, "Weathering the Storm," including rumors that the Army Air Corps team saved the day and the British forecasters failed


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Pat Shingleton: The Porch http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-porch/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-porch/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 8 Nov 2014 12:49:21 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: The Porch

Porches were originally designed to provide space for folks to pause before entering or exiting a home or building. As noted in a previous column, porches in England provided cover for worshippers and for liturgical use. Before a baptism, the priest would begin the service on the porch. In medieval times, a room was added above the porch to be used as a school room, storeroom or armory or as a custodian residence for supervision of the church. I remember our back porch as an area for removal of working clothes, boots and shoes; decreasing dirt from the interior of the house. Our covered front porch provided protection from sun and rain. The porch was a place of interaction with family, friends and visitors, rarely experience these days.


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Pat Shingleton: "Football At Night..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-football-at-night-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-football-at-night-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 7 Nov 2014 4:09:20 PM Pat Shingleton Growing-up in the northeast, college football games were always played in the afternoon. We followed Pitt, Penn State and especially Notre Dame, where my brother Mike enrolled and local football stars Terry Hanratty and Chuck Landolfi played. Similar to Baton Rouge, football games were limited to just three network channels so the power of WWL put us in Tiger Stadium at night with the 60 temperatures. Playing "under the lights" for us was confined to Ewing Park's baseball and football fields. Alabama never beat Notre Dame until the Nick Saban era, not the case with LSU. From the hi-fi to the television, I remember my brother Mike, Manager of the Top Shelf in Pittsburgh, hurling objects at the TV when LSU, stomped the Irish 28 to 8 in 1971.


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Pat Shingleton: "THE Honeymoon..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-honeymoon-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-honeymoon-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 5 Nov 2014 4:02:49 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Moonrise tonight will be at 5:20 pm. This full moon was referenced by Native Americans as the "Full Beaver Moon." "Honeymoon" dates back to the 1500s when newlyweds enjoyed the fullness of the period, after their marriage. Once settled, it was presumed that the experience would "wane," similar to a waning moon. Four years ago Erika Svanstrom and her husband, Stefan, experienced an unusual honeymoon, including six natural disasters that began with a major snowstorm in Munich. In Cairns, Australia they experienced a cyclone with flooding in Brisbane. In New Zealand a magnitude 6.3 earthquake struck. Their next stop was Tokyo and another earthquake and tsunami followed by a monsoon in Bali. The Svanstrom's have been in therapy ever since.


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Pat Shingleton: "Hail Blasting" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hail-blasting-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hail-blasting-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 4 Nov 2014 3:53:31 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Tuesday's column noted Griffin Morgan's research on the use of cannons in preventing hail damage to crops. Luigi Bombicci was a minerologist in Bologna, Italy and in 1880, believed that hail could be prevented. His theory of "spherohedron" described the hailstone as a process of crystallization and to prevent the development of hail, sound could be used. In 1896, Albert Steiger, Mayor of Windisch-Feistritz, Austria, made the first attempt to defeat hail with the force of sound and did so by modifying a locomotive smokestack. He packed the smokestack with black powder and directed the discharge directly into a thunderstorm. Witnessing this, Mayor Steiger professed that hail would no longer fall on his fields and cannons were accepted.


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Pat Shingleton: "Boom-Boom Hail" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-boom-boom-hail-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-boom-boom-hail-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 3 Nov 2014 3:58:20 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In 1907 the Italian Royal Academy of Sciences noted that tests of anti-hail cannons weren't effective and were expensive and useless. By the early twentienth century, anti-hail cannons disappeared. Replacing the cannons were anti-hail rockets that would explode 800 grams of dynamite, above the ground, to prevent hail formation. These explosions caused cold core eddies that surround hail, pulverizing it. These rockets were in conflict with safety measures implemented by civil aviation. In 1972, the Corballan Company of France marketed a new version of the hail cannon and remains the largest manufacturer of the devices. The new cannons substitute acetylene for black powder, automatically load and reload and are fired from remote locations.


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Pat Shingleton: Hold Your Breath http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hold-your-breath/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hold-your-breath/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 2 Nov 2014 2:46:32 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: Hold Your Breath

Here's a few items of interest. Certain species of migratory birds, fish and insects can sense the Earth's magnetic field and use magnetsome cells in their brains to orient themselves and navigate during migration. In Egypt, visitors breathing inside the great pyramid Chephren at Giza are contributing to its destruction. About 0.7 ounces of water vapor is exhaled per person, raising the humidity and damaging limestone blocks. A ventilation system is in place to alleviate the problem. Can you be allergic to cold weather? Some people may step outside on a cold day and break out in hives. To check for this, place a resealable plastic bag, filled with ice on your arm for two minutes. If an itchy welt appears, you need an antihistamine.


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Pat Shingleton: On Time and In Time http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-on-time-and-in-time/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-on-time-and-in-time/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 1 Nov 2014 2:36:09 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: On Time and In Time

We said goodbye to Daylight-Saving Time this morning, also referred to as "summer-time" in many areas of the world. Daylight-Saving-Time makes the sun "set" one hour later and reduces the period between sunset and bedtime by one hour. The idea was first mentioned by Benjamin Franklin in 1784 and was first advocated by London builder William Wellett in his pamphlet "Waste of Daylight." He proposed advancing clocks 20 minutes over four Sundays in April and retarding them by the same amount over four Sundays in September. In 1916, England followed Germany and adopted "British Summer Time." During World War II, clocks were put two hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time then called Double Summer Time. Days will be getting shorter and nights longer.


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Pat Shingleton: "Rubbed the Wrong Way" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rubbed-the-wrong-way-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rubbed-the-wrong-way-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 31 Oct 2014 4:01:53 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Some believe weather changes create additional cold and allergy symptoms. Our grandfather professed this and on his nightstand would place a bowl of apples, onions, and garlic, laced with whiskey, when he experienced chest congestion. As noted in a previous column, mom would send us to school with Vick's Vapor Rub piled on our chest and throat that prevented me from getting a "date." Another application was a "mustard plaster." This combination included: flour, baking soda, dried mustard mixed with shortening, butter, lard or Oleo. Mixed with hot water, this concoction is packed into muslin or flannelette then applied to one's chest and layered with Vaseline. Two weeks ago, I tried this application and was escorted from the bedroom.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Corny Halloween Prank" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-corny-halloween-prank-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-corny-halloween-prank-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 30 Oct 2014 4:01:24 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

More than 50 years ago, cold, rain or snow never cancelled our Halloween. As noted in previous columns, gardens in the neighborhood found lingering corn stalks with an ear or two. The gravel-like kernels were twisted from the cob and separated into paper bags. When the shucking ended a prank was underway-for some. Me and my brothers Denis and Kevin did not participate in these activities. The Halloweener's that did included: the Sudano boys, Dangerous Doug Kelly, Pumpkin Head Hulick, Dumps Wiley, Skunk Tritt and our brother, Mike. In addition to completing our homework at the kitchen table, we assisted Mom with treat distribution that included cupcakes and popcorn balls. The rattle of the hard corn on the windows sounded like a machine gun.


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Pat Shingleton: "Super Sandy and The Perfect Storm" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-super-sandy-and-the-perfect-storm-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-super-sandy-and-the-perfect-storm-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 29 Oct 2014 3:55:07 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On this date in 2012, New Jersey residents were experiencing the devastation of Superstorm Sandy. In 1991, another storm, referred to as the Halloween Storm, lashed the North Carolina coast for five days. Hurricane-force winds pounded New England and New Jersey causing the highest tides on the Eastern Seaboard since the Great Atlantic Hurricane of '44. As noted in a previous column, it was the basis for the novel and the movie, "The Perfect Storm," and the sinking of the Andrea Gail. It was called "perfect" because of the events that created the storm. An extra-tropical cyclone developed along a cold front. Upper air support and Hurricane Grace, making a hairpin turn to the east, led to treacherous sea conditions over the western Atlantic.


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Pat Shingleton: "No Water... No Lawns..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-no-water-no-lawns-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-no-water-no-lawns-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 28 Oct 2014 3:52:38 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

California's drought is not a temporary obstacle but a long term consequence. The region has endured decades-long periods of drought, something the state is likely to endure in years to come. Researchers have constructed simulations to determine how California can handle an extensive 70-year-drought. Experts expect the state can continue to thrive with water conservation; a necessity rather than an option. Past procedures will be adjusted. First on the list are lawns. Typical green yards will be one of the first casualties of a prolonged drought as incentives to property owners include switching to desert-friendly landscaping, requiring very little water. Groundwater and waste water will be recycled rather than dumping it into the Pacific.


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Pat Shingleton: "From '26 to '15?" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-from-26-to-15-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-from-26-to-15-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 27 Oct 2014 4:01:33 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Tropical Storm Hanna is hugging the Nicaraguan/Honduras border as the eighth storm of the season. Meanwhile, Florida has gone 3,270 days without a hurricane. The last time this streak occurred was between 1980 and1984. The strongest storm on record that hit Miami was "The 1926 Hurricane." Experts believe that if a similar storm would hit Miami it would result in $180 billion in damage. The Florida Division of Emergency Management is preparing for a major hurricane to hit this area due to complacency. The number of people living near Florida's seashore has increased by 1.1 million since 1990 to 4.8 million. Most of the increase is attributed to seaside growth over the last four decades. When storms don't strike, many forget the consequences.


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