WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2017, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Fri, 28 Apr 2017 10:04:19 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "How to Make a Cloud..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-how-to-make-a-cloud-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-how-to-make-a-cloud-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 27 Apr 2017 11:01:38 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Before we creep into the peppery weather patterns of late May and early June, here’s a suggestion for the teachers. It’s a great time of the year to investigate the different types of clouds, what they are and where they originate.  You can Google or Fire Fox a cloud identification chart while charting the daily cloud patterns provides an excellent assignment. You can also make your own cloud.  Items needed are an empty, two-liter bottle, hot water, and a match.  Pour about an inch of hot, boiling water into the bottle.  Light the match, blow it out and drop it into the bottle. Immediately re-cap the bottle and give it a vigorous shake.  Here's the last step, squeeze the bottle and release it.  When you stop squeezing, the pressure inside the bottle drops and is similar to the drop in atmospheric pressure before a storm.  The smoke gives the drops of water a place to land and you’ve made a cloud. The students will enjoy their homemade cloud.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: A Nazi Weather Station..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-nazi-weather-station-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-nazi-weather-station-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 26 Apr 2017 10:45:46 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton: A Nazi Weather Station...

In 1942 Nazi scientists built a weather station on the remote Arctic Island of Alexandra Land.  The tactical base was  known as "Treasure Island" and was long thought to be a myth until Russian researchers at the Russian Arctic National Park made the discovery last August. The station was believed to have been primarily used to monitor weather along the Northern Sea Route. Monitoring weather in this location was essential for officers making decisions on troop movements, submarines and ships. R.T.com reports that Treasure Island was operational from September 1943 until July 1944 and transmitted more than 700 weather reports. The researchers discovered more than 500 relics at the base including World War II-era meteorological equipment. Many of the metallic instrumentation objects were compromised due to the cold, humid conditions however documents were well preserved by the Arctic climate. The base was abandoned when the team of Nazi scientists, at the station, became ill after consuming contaminated polar bear meat.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Barn Raising and Two Death Valleys" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-barn-raising-and-two-death-valleys-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-barn-raising-and-two-death-valleys-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 25 Apr 2017 10:38:18 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

In the 18th and 19th centuries a barn was the first, largest and most costly structure needed for the family and a “barn raising” was an event that brought neighbors together to assemble the barn. The Amish still embrace this effort and years ago, Home Energy Efficient Team borrowed the barn raising idea to gather neighbors to weather proof local houses. The Boston Globe noted that local residents join construction experts to insulate pipes, install weather stripping and weatherize homes for the winter season.  Homeowners pay for the necessary materials as well as refreshments for the “barn raising event” parties.  HEET organizers were successful in improving the energy efficiency of homes and in educating residents to maintain an environmentally healthy home. Finally, we're familiar with two Death Valleys. One on the campus of LSU and the other has some impressive credentials that include three confirmed records. It is reputed to be the lowest, hottest, and driest spot in the United States and in the entire Western Hemisphere. The lowest lying area of dry land is Badwater Basin at 282 feet below sea level in the valley. The highest official temperature was 134 degrees recorded at Greenland Ranch on July 10, 1913. The lowest average annual precipitation was 1.66 inches of rain. Interestingly, despite Death Valley being the driest spot, roads in Death valley are normally closed several times a year as a result of flash floods. Rains sweep down the barren slopes of the surrounding mountains and into the valley.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "An Outbreak and a Picture" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-outbreak-and-a-picture-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-outbreak-and-a-picture-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 24 Apr 2017 11:00:36 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Monday, April 24th was the anniversary of the “1908 Tornado.”  The Tornado Project reported that this was a major tornadic event when a twister touched down in the community of Weiss in northwest Livingston Parish.  It ranks seventh on the list of Top Ten List of Killer Tornadoes. The tornado was approximately two miles wide, moved east-northeast into St. Helena Parish, then to Tangipahoa Parish and exited the state from Washington Parish.  In Denham Springs, two people were killed with the worst destruction and loss-of-life in Amite with 29 deaths and four more near Wilmer.  When the tornado finally left Louisiana and Mississippi, 143 people died, 400 were injured and 1,935 residents were homeless. On August 28, 1884, F.N. Robinson, in the Dakota Territory, captured what was thought to be the first picture of a tornado. Weatherwise Magazine published the picture, including a thunderstorm cloud with two funnels. A debris cloud is visible and was part of an outbreak that killed six with property damage and loss of livestock. Updated research noted that four months earlier on April 26th in Garnett, Kansas, A.A. Adams photographed another tornado officially becoming the first twister picture.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Floods, Dams and Concrete" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-floods-dams-and-concrete-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-floods-dams-and-concrete-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 21 Apr 2017 5:53:35 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

April is noted for showers and also represents the foggiest month for South Louisiana. On April 19, 1952, the tankers Esso Suez and Esso Greensboro collided in dense fog, 200 miles south of Morgan City. The Suez incurred a 20-foot bow gash with both ships bursting into flames. River pilots are trained to navigate during episodes of dense fog not only on the rivers but within simulators that replicate a variety of rough weather scenarios. Included within the scenarios are river levels and snow melt that increases those levels. Fog was the reason for a horrible disaster recognized as the worst aviation accident in history.  Two Boeing 747s collided on the runway in the Canary Islands in 1977, killing 582. On July 25, 1956, the Andrea Doria sank after colliding with the Stockholm in dense fog, 45 miles south of Nantucket Light taking 51 lives. On this date, 89 years ago the Great Flood of Louisiana implemented the existing levee system. Imperfect engineering and shoddy construction caused the collapse of dams, such as the Johnstown Flood of 1889.  On May 16, 1874, 138 people died as a result of poor construction and a dam break in Williamsburg, MA.  On March 12, 1928, the St. Francis Dam, in service less than two years, collapsed near Santa Paula, CA, killing 450. February 26, 1972, two coal slag dams along Buffalo Creek in southern West Virginia broke, unloading two miles of backed-up water into a lower dam that exploded, 4,000 homes were washed away with 125 deaths.  June 5, 1976, the 305-foot Teton Dam in Idaho collapsed, released 80 billion gallons of water into adjoining farmland. It takes concrete to build levees and dams. Water is the most widely used material and second on the list is concrete and next to steel, concrete is the strongest material ever manufactured. Concrete cannot be fully recycled however a resurrected solution includes the use of lightning.  Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics in Holzkirchen, Germany revived a method, developed by Russian scientists in the 1940s, called electrodynamic fragmentation.  The problem with recycling concrete is breaking down cement, water, and aggregate or the mixture of stone particles that consist of gravel and limestone grit.  The process includes placing concrete in water then blasting it with a 150-nanosecond bolt of lightning.  The bolt runs through solid material, creating a small explosion then tearing apart and breaking down its components. The fragmentation plant processes one ton of concrete waste per hour with larger volumes expected in the future. 


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Tree House and Tryouts..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-tree-house-and-tryouts-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-tree-house-and-tryouts-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 20 Apr 2017 10:24:36 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The Animal Planet broadcasts a series entitled “Treehouse Masters” and arboreal architect Pete Nelson’s expertise in showcasing these amazing structures. He’s incorporated his exploits in a book appropriately entitled, “Treehouse.”  Lutz’s Construction Co. had their shop and dump site adjacent to our neighborhood. The site provided scrap wood that was reused for projects such as soap box derbies and tree houses.  Our tree houses included strips nailed to a tree providing a  ”ladder” to the top.  There were no “plans’ for the construction, just a handful of kids pounding nails into boards. The tree house test included a heavy shower and how much water stayed out.  What wasn’t tested was the weight-wind scenario. Six kids jammed into a tree house was followed by cracking and crashing as the tree house turned into a ground house. In closing, our Little League baseball seasons initially began with a “tryout.” Each kid with glove in hand warmed up by playing “catch” and also donning a sign, pinned to the back of their sweatshirt, that showcased a huge number. Some kids were grandfathered into a team because an older brother played for a sponsoring organization. The league included: The Elks, The Moose, The Kiwanis, The Lions, The American Legion and The Rotary. Our brothers, Denis and Mike, always played for The Elks but Don Huffman wanted Kevin and I on The Rotary. All aspects of the game were practiced and practice ending shower resulted in “sliding” practice. Hook slides, hand slides and leg tuck slides were practiced. Mom wasn’t very pleased with the muddied, grass stained “jeans” that came in the back door


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Rogue Waves..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rogue-waves-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rogue-waves-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 19 Apr 2017 9:43:36 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Tsunami is a Japanese term for harbor wave, caused by undersea earthquakes. Rogue waves are gigantic walls of water pushing through the oceans.  Experts believe they are caused by underwater landslides that ripple the water to create a wave. Others believe rogue waves are caused by fluctuations in atmospheric pressure associated with squall lines or lines of thunderstorms. These waves appear out of nowhere as incidents of huge waves have dated as far back as 1861. Then, they were referred to as "freak waves," "monster waves," and "extreme waves." In March of 1861, off the west coast of Ireland, eagle Island lighthouse incurred the smashing of 23 window panes as a rogue wave "surmounted a 133 foot cliff." In 1900 three lighthouse operators disappeared on the Scottish coast from another wave. In the 1960s in fair weather off the coast of Spain, a large freighter was struck with a 90-foot wave. On July 3, 1992, a rogue wave swept across Daytona Beach with an 18 foot wall of water that injured 75 people and smashed hundreds of cars near the beach. North of Bermuda In 1984, a 117-foot, three masted ship sunk in less than a minute after being struck by a rogue wave resulting in numerous deaths. Cruise ships are designed to withstand hurricane force winds and storm surge as the Queen Elizabeth 2, and RMS Queen Mary reported incidents of the damaging waves. Years ago, the cruise ship, Norwegian Dawn, was blasted by a wave that was seven stories high.  The 70 foot wave occurred off the Carolina coast, after squally weather erupted on the returning voyage.  Analysis found that a low pressure system, spinning counter clockwise, encountered a high pressure system moving clockwise that created a narrow channel of strong winds and monstrous waves. The huge rogue wave injured four and flooded sixty cabins.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Foooooog!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-foooooog-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-foooooog-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 18 Apr 2017 10:30:05 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

April is noted for showers and also represents the foggiest month for South Louisiana. On this date in 1952 the tankers Esso Suez and Esso Greensboro collided in dense fog, 200 miles south of Morgan City. The Suez incurred a 20-foot bow gash with both ships bursting into flames. River pilots are trained to navigate during episodes of dense fog not only on the rivers but within simulators that replicate a variety of rough weather scenarios. Included within the scenarios are river levels and snow melt that increases those levels. Fog was the reason for a horrible disaster recognized as the worst aviation accident in history.  Two Boeing 747s collided on the runway in the Canary Islands in 1977, killing 582. On July 25, 1956, the Andrea Doria sank after colliding with the Stockholm in dense fog, 45 miles south of Nantucket Light taking 51 lives.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: The Floods and The Dams..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-floods-and-the-dams-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-floods-and-the-dams-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 17 Apr 2017 10:27:29 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton: The Floods and The Dams...


On this date, 84 years ago the Great Flood of Louisiana implemented our existing levee system. Other flood episodes include imperfect engineering and shoddy construction that caused the collapse of dams such as the Johnstown Flood of 1889.  On May 16, 1874, 138 people died as a result of poor construction that resulted in a dam break in Williamsburg, MA.  On March 12, 1928, the St. Francis Dam, in service less than two years, collapsed near Santa Paula, CA, killing 450. February 26, 1972, two coal slag dams along Buffalo Creek in southern West Virginia broke, unloading two miles of backed-up water into a lower dam that actually exploded as 4,000 homes were washed away with 125 deaths.  June 5, 1976, the 305-foot Teton Dam in Idaho collapsed and released 80 billion gallons of water into adjoining farmland.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "A 40 Day Tradition" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-40-day-tradition-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-40-day-tradition-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 13 Apr 2017 11:15:49 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Possibly you’re making a stop at your local pharmacy this weekend for a pair of sunglasses, sunscreen or beverages.  Our canisters remain in place until Monday and over the last 40 days we have solicited your support for our “Fill a Prescription for the Needy” campaign.  Since 1999 almost a million dollars was collected for the St. Vincent de Paul Pharmacy.  Our sponsor, The Baton Rouge Clinic, has greatly assisted in supporting our drive and contributing additional prescription medicine.  “Fill a Prescription for the Needy” is the last resort for the elderly, poor and homeless who are unable to afford prescription medicine. Years ago, Dr. Redfield Bryan and Father Mike Moroney asked me to design the idea.  My heartfelt  and especially Michael Alcaldo and the folks at St.Vincent de Paul for their efforts.  Most importantly thanks to all of you who dropped your contribution into our canisters. For your Easter services this morning, the official sunrise will be at 6:36 a.m. Weather journals will occasionally refer to the tugging, twisting, global wind patterns that include the westerlies, the trade winds and appropriately for today, the "easterlies." If your Easter egg hunts and other outdoor activities are after the 3:00 pm hour - some shower-dodging may be included on your Easter menu. In my younger years, we would experience a full-blown snowstorm on Easter Sunday in western Pennsylvania. On this special morning I found references to "weather" in the Scriptures. In Psalms 97:4 we find, "His lightning lights up the world; the Earth sees and trembles." The 147th Psalm says, "He spreads the snow like wool and scatters the frost like ashes."


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Wind and the Titanic..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wind-and-the-titanic-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wind-and-the-titanic-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 12 Apr 2017 10:28:11 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On this date in 1871, renowned French scientist Camille Flammarion was writing L’Atmosphere when a strong wind gust blew open the window near his desk. In seconds the whirlwind shuffled his manuscript onto the street.  The manuscript was transported through the rain to Lahure’s printing office in the Rude de Fleurus a half-mile-away without a single page destroyed or missing. The chapter was devoted to the force of wind. His publisher’s assistant noticed the leaves of the manuscript outside the office thinking he had dropped them and quickly gathered them.  He took the pages into the printing office and told no one for fear of termination but later disclosed the incident.  Flammarion was also a collector of coincidences. Tomorrow marks the 105th anniversary of a disaster in the North Atlantic. Icebergs doomed the RMS Titanic on the night of April 14, 1912 at 11;40 pm.  Approximately 700 passengers and crew who survived the disaster, testified that sea conditions resembled a placid lake on an unusually calm yet cold night.  Other ships plying the waters of the North Atlantic, over a two month period, reported an unusually high number of icebergs in the shipping lanes, the same lanes through which the Titanic sailed.  In 1912, weather technology was in its infancy as scientists began understanding the dynamics behind weather. The role of weather was never considered in the investigation. Weatherwise magazine's research noted that weather patterns in the winter and early spring of 1911-1912 were to blame for the ship’s demise. Changes in atmospheric pressure at sea level caused strong north winds that propelled the icebergs farther south than normal, placing them into the Titanic’s course. Iceberg season in the north Atlantic is April through July where more than 80 percent of the total number of icebergs cross south of latitude 48 north. In April, 1912, more than 900 icebergs floated in the North Atlantic.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "My First Weathercast and the Passover Moon" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-my-first-weathercast-and-the-passover-moon-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-my-first-weathercast-and-the-passover-moon-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 10 Apr 2017 9:57:20 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

I've referenced Western Pennsylvania in numerous columns but Baton Rouge is home and here's one of the explanations.  A talent agent forwarded Carlton Cremeens, then News Director at WAFB, my credentials and he flew me out of a snowstorm in Kansas City in March, 1976 to warm, springtime weather here.  He and General Manager, Tommie Gibbens, not only gave me a tour of Baton Rouge but parked me on a bench at L.S.U. during class change and for a single guy it was an “eye-opening” experience.  We enjoyed lunch at Mike Anderson's on Highland Road and dinner at Don’s Seafood on Airline where Carlton ordered up a tray of food that I thought was bait. It was Mr. Gibbens who first told my wife.... “Mabyn, I have a weatherman coming for you!”  Ironically we had never met. My first weathercast in B.R. was 41 years ago on April 11, 1976. Of greater importance, Passover began yesterday at 7:29 PM. Moon rise will occur tonight at 8:04 PM and its illumination will be 99.8%, designating it as an official full moon.  One school of thought suggests "light" was needed for the Jewish people to leave Egypt, in the middle of the night, and begin their journey out of bondage. Guiding them in the darkness was a full moon, referred to as the Passover Moon. Easter is calculated as the first Sunday after the paschal full moon or after the vernal equinox. Our last full moon was Saturday, March 11, as the moon phase remains a factor when Easter occurs during the Liturgical year. Approximately forty days ago was the beginning of Lent and Easter can fall anywhere between March 22 and April 25.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Wind Set-Down..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wind-set-down-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wind-set-down-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 6 Apr 2017 6:38:47 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

An archived Weatherwise magazine report noted that “wind set down” occurs when strong winds blow over water for an extended period of time, shifting the water body downward. This downward shift causes a low-angle tilt and the upwind, shore water level drops. Here’s an excerpt about the Red Sea. “As the sun sank over the Nile Delta, a man stood on-shore… raising his rod as a howling wind blew from the east. In the morning the sea was gone, blown to the west; permitting people to walk upon dry ground where the day before fish swam and boats sailed.” The man was not Moses as described in Exodus 14 but Major-General Sir Alexander B. Tulloch, holding a surveyor’s rod, not a staff, in 1882. Researchers believe that “wind set down” is comparable to a hurricane’s storm surge. In the past, on the western end of Lake Erie, “wind set down” events have dropped the lake by 2 meters. At Cedar Key Harbor in Florida in September 6, 2004 a 1 meter drop in water level occurred as Hurricane Frances passed. It then rose 1.5 meters above sea level in nine hours.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "The Umbrella and Aromas..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-umbrella-and-aromas-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-umbrella-and-aromas-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 5 Apr 2017 10:45:53 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

I have mentioned in previous columns aromas and odors due to weather conditions.  Following a frontal passage, the northwest wind will send the smell of fresh-baked bread to the back door of the studio, compliments of Flowers Bakery on Florida Blvd. A stronger north wind drives the smell of burning wood from the paper plants in the Feliciana’s and before the closure of the treatment plant on River Road, a southerly wind would send another the odor to our television station on Highland Road. Years ago, Seattle based J and D’s Foods developed bacon salt and manufactured nine other bacon related products. They then developed BaconAir.  Studies profess that inhaling pure oxygen can boost energy, fight disease and increase mental alertness. BaconAir attempted to combine the deliciousness of bacon with 95% pure Himalayan oxygen. The forecast holds off any rain until next Tuesday with just a slight shot so the umbrella won't be needed. It comes from the Latin word umbra meaning shade and was used in Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, and Ancient Rome. The oldest reference to the umbrella in China dates to the year 21 CE and the King of Siam in 1687 gifted them to his subjects. Reversible, collapsible umbrellas are now of great benefit in getting into the car. Once again, years ago,  Ambient Devices marketed an umbrella that will kicked-out an alert when rain was expected.  They named it the Forecasting Umbrella and when rain was forecasted, the umbrella’s handle will flash.  Data from AccuWeather.com activated the umbrella’s sensors and could differentiate between a storm, with fast flashes to slow flashes for sprinkles.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Paludires-Farming the Salt..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-paludires-farming-the-salt-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-paludires-farming-the-salt-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 4 Apr 2017 10:28:00 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Salt farming depends on the weather and for French artisan farmers; it’s a labor of love. The wind and the heat of the sun creates a high tide in Guerande, France; an area of marshy meadows, also known as the “Cote Sauvage.” Europeans have harvested salt from the earth at this location since the ninth century and salt farmers or paludiers use the same technique and tools to collect this caviar of salt. The collection process begins with a wooden gate that traps the sea water into the marsh. When the correct amount of water flows at the correct rate, a maze of clay walls promotes slow evaporation. After a month, the water seeps into shallow pools and salt appears.  Tides, sunny warm days are the key ingredients in salt farming. The marshy meadows of France include 200 salt farmers or paludiers that collect the gourmet of all salts for use in renowned restaurants worldwide. Once a wooden gate traps the sea water, a collection of clay walls promotes slow evaporation. Seepage leads to shallow pools and the appearance of the salt. Salt farmers use a tool that resembles a swimming pool skimmer to gently drag what looks like a lattice of thin ice into a wicker basket.  After skimming the top, the evaporation process continues, leaving the clay-bottomed basin loaded with coarse grey salt. Natural salt is less acidic and less sharp than industrial salts and the paludier’s harvest of 60 tons of salt relies on wind, water and the sun.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Vultures and Winter Count" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-vultures-and-winter-count-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-vultures-and-winter-count-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 3 Apr 2017 10:41:31 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Turkey vultures are beneficial to Louisiana as they not only clean the roadways of decomposing animals, also known as “road-kill,” but feasts on trash discarded from motorists. The vulture's head-shape provides easier access inside a carcass. Noticing the scavenging vultures along our Interstates, highways and byways may be a stomach turner and another function of the bird is borderline gross.  To stay cool, it uses a process known as urohydrosis which is a polite way of noting that it urinates on its legs to prevent overheating. This process serves two purposes for the vulture.  The evaporating urine cools blood circulating through its legs and also activates a disinfectant that eliminates germs that the scavenger may have absorbed from an earlier breakfast, lunch or dinner. In closing, “winter count,” afforded Native Americans a means of recording the winter season.  Many tribes went into hibernation during the harsh winters and sketched images that also included battles, deaths of leaders and extreme climate conditions.  Some of the winter count entries date back to 1686 where John K. Bear noted “ice all over the land.” In 1711 Batiste Good journaled, “four lodges drowned winter” and Ben Kindle reported in 1773, “Even the dogs got snow blindness.”  The Native American, known as American Horse, noted from 1789 to 1791, “They could not hunt on account of the deep snow” and floods in 1825 to 1826 found multiple authors reporting, “Missouri floods, kills 30 lodges.” Researchers believe these entries suggest that Native American winter counts contain valuable climate records.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Welcome to April" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-welcome-to-april-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-welcome-to-april-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 31 Mar 2017 10:23:12 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Maximum sunshine today is providing a nice dry-out with returning showers band thundershowers Sunday night into Monday. Rough weather was reported in many locations for the last days of March. On April 2, 1958, New England recorded one of its worst coastal storms.  Beaches from Cape Cod, MA to Portland, ME reported 50 feet of erosion and miles of seawalls and bulkheads were demolished as the storm sandblasted cottages onshore and inland.. On April 3, 1974, a “Super Outbreak” of tornadoes occurred from Alabama to West Virginia causing 315 deaths.  An Alabama man was first injured by a twister, found safety in a church and was killed by a second violent tornado.  On this date in 1956, a combination of wind, rain, hail and tornadoes swept across Joliet, IL. Nine people were blown through a barricade into an excavation. The only potential risk to this series of showers and thundershowers is a lot of water tossed down in a hort period.  This could cause some increases on the watershed of the Amite, Comite, Tickfaw and Tangipahoa River Basins. Folks in these locations are accustomed to rise on these tributaries.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Baseball Season and Super Brown Frosty" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-baseball-season-and-super-brown-frosty-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-baseball-season-and-super-brown-frosty-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 30 Mar 2017 10:28:00 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

We’re eleven days into the spring season and we can’t rule out colder weather and possibly another snow event for our northern friends. On this date, 27 years ago, Myron L. Ace and eight of his friends were enjoying their induction into the Guinness Book of World Records.  Myron and his crew used a crane to pile eight inch blocks of snow in the shape of a snowman in Anchorage, Alaska.  The record setting snowman took three weeks to complete and after the group finished the project, Anchorage was hit with a dust storm driven by 70 mile-per-hour winds.  Their masterpiece, named “Super Frosty,” was renamed “Super Brown Frosty” and was then recognized as a sculpture of brown sugar. April 2nd is the opening day for  Baseball 2017. The Yankees head to ampa Bay, the Giants are in Arizona, the World Champion Cubs take on the Caridnals in St. Louis,  and the Brave are in New York against thre Mets. the beginning of the season jogs memories of an old classmate and fellow ball-player and the difficulties of cold weather and baseball.  Bob Haine was our star pitcher, had a great fast-ball and threw a no-hitter our senior year with the Riverside Panthers of Ellwood City, PA. Danny Oliastro, directed the Panthers to a couple of State Championships in the early 2000's.  Danny was our assistant coach under Ed Ellenich who was obsessed with beating his hometown school, Monaca High. Ed also wanted the fastest team and most of the time we were running laps and sprints rather than embracing batting practice. Back to Bob and noting that our opener started with snow flurries and 30 degrees. Ahead 2 to 1 in the sixth, Andy Miller dropped a fly ball that brought two runs in for Monaca. Ed wasn't happy with the loss. Our hands were numb from the wooden bats and the cold weather but Bob's were excessively numb. During an argument in the school library, he punched Dave Pelloni in the head which compromised the pitching rotation.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Our Azaleas and Their Cherry Trees." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-our-azaleas-and-their-cherry-trees-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-our-azaleas-and-their-cherry-trees-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 30 Mar 2017 12:34:54 AM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On March 27, 1912, Tokyo's Mayor, Yakio Ozahi presented the city of Washington, D.C. with 3,000 cherry trees to celebrate the "lasting friendship between the United States and Japan."  In Baton Rouge, our first Spring indicators are the Japanese magnolias followed by our marvelous azaleas that peaked early this year due to a very warm February. The National Cherry Blossom Festival began March 20th and will conclude on April 17th.  Activities include parades, dinners, fireworks, art displays, musical performances and a 10K race. Traditionally, buds on the trees usually burst in the early spring and just like south Louisiana, the blossoming depends on the weather. As we experienced the early-blooming of our azaleas the opposite was true for the cherry trees.  A recent cold-snap diminished the number of blossoms in comparison to previous years.  The peak bloom period averages between March 21st and March 30th. This year, from March 20th through April 17th, 87% of the blossoms open up and from now until April 9, only 20 percent of the blossoms are open.  The peak period varies each year when warm weather replaces the winter’s chill.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Hurricane Tracking and Time..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hurricane-tracking-and-time-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hurricane-tracking-and-time-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 28 Mar 2017 5:45:53 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On Tuesday names were retired from the hurricane list.  They include the 2016 storms Matthew and Otto while Erica and Joaquin were cut from the list last year.  All storms reached the destructive and devastating criteria for removal as we remember Andrea, Katrina and Gustav that were also released years ago. In preparation for the 2017 season, the number of forecasters and forecasts continue to increase. A new website called the "Seasonal Hurricane Predictions" site will merge the work of 17 different prediction centers in an attempt to centralize forecasts into one location. Some of those centers include Accuweather, Coastal Carolina University, Colorado State University, North Carolina State University, The weather Company and Cubano de Meteorologia representing agencies from the United States, Mexico, the United Kingdom, Cuba and Norway. The site will average the predictions for the number of North Atlantic storms for a given season and run comparatives of previous storms dating back to 1966.


Permalink| Comments


]]>