WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2015, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Thu, 30 Jul 2015 16:07:45 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Stick to It!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-stick-to-it-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-stick-to-it-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 29 Jul 2015 6:51:30 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Our recent recent survey noting ways to keep and stay cool during the summertime heat included the consumption of snowballs. When we were kids, Mom asked that we save our popsicle sticks for two reasons.  One was arts and crafts whereby we would glue them together to create something?  The other use was for Mom's own pop-sticks. She would place Remer's Blend or Kool-Aid into ice-trays with a stick. These cool treats weren't that good. When Frank Epperson was 11, he took a wooden stir stick, placed it in soda pop and placed it outside one wintry New York evening.  Frank enjoyed the frozen treat the next day.  In 1923, Frank used a Birch tongue depressor to hold the frozen delight and applied for a patent for his "frozen ice on a stick;" calling it the "Epsicle Ice Pop."  Frank's children encouraged him to change the name to "Popsicle" and later sold his idea to the Joe Lowe Company. Good Humor Ice Cream now holds the rights and during the Great Depression two Popsicles were joined together and named “Twin Popsicles.” As noted,  popsicle sticks have been used for a variety of arts and crafts projects.


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"An Unfortunate Moonlit Night..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/an-unfortunate-moonlit-night-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/an-unfortunate-moonlit-night-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 28 Jul 2015 9:46:45 PM Pat Shingleton

Our next full Moon will be this Friday with moonrise at 8:10, in the evening, setting at 6:33 Saturday morning. Native Americans referred to the July Full Moon as the Full Buck Moon or the Full Thunder Moon. On July 29, 1945, moon rise over the Philippine Sea occurred at 10:30 p.m. With maximum illumination, surface reflectivity was at its height.  Japanese submariners targeted the silhouette of a cruiser on that moonlit night and torpedoed the vessel. If not for the moon glow, the USS Indianapolis would have passed unnoticed. SKY and TELESCOPE magazine predicted a repeat of this celestial scene, 13 years ago, on the exact night and the exact time which marked the 58th anniversary of the disaster. Of the 1,200 sailors on-board, 900 escaped the attack but only 317 survived four days of exposure and shark attacks. The Indianapolis was delivering components of the first atomic bomb to Tinian Island for the bombing of Hiroshima. The bomber, Enola Gay, delivered the payload and the navigator of the Enola Gay, Dutch Van Kirk, died July 28, 2014.


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"School Clothes..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/school-clothes-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/school-clothes-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 27 Jul 2015 5:52:00 PM Pat Shingleton

When my wife, Mabyn, and her brother, Frank Kean, suggested the "Coats for Kids" program, it was quickly embraced by WBRZ's then News Director, John Spain. One of the slogan's that Mabyn's agency advanced was "Kids Grow, Coats Don't..." This slogan was certainly appropriate for me, while growing-up and with schools back in session in a couple of weeks I was reminded of our return-to-school preparations. With a limited budget and no school uniforms, our Mom would schedule the traditional "school clothes trip." A favorite shopping spot for her but maybe not her four boys was Zayre's. This Department Store began in 1956 and was later sold to Ames Department Stores in 1990, later merging with T.J. Maxx. Once we entered the massive store we received our orders, "Three pairs of school pants and three shirts is all we can afford," Mom insisted. The sizing for our shirts was relatively easy but not the school pants.  Mom instructed that we "try-on" pants that were at least a size or two larger.  Mom was quite the seamstress and made practically every one of my sister's school dresses from patterns in addition to numerous prom and wedding gowns for friends and relatives. Upon the return trip from Zayre's, her boys were obligated to put on their school pants and stand on the dining room table. Mom would then measure and "pin-up" the trousers to an exact fit and tailored them to our liking.  This process also included "hemming-up" the "pant-legs" to the needed length without cuffs. The reason for no-cuffs? As the school year progressed, and similar to our coats campaign of today, we grew but the pants didn't.  A traditional  comment from school mates included, "Hey Pat, are you getting ready for a flood?" Where the pant length should touch the top of the shoe, mine were much higher, thus the jabs.  A bit of additional embarrassment included the three hemlines that were evident throughout the school year from the needed adjustments from September through June. We also were members of the "Hand-Me-Down Club."  Sign-up for Pat's columns at www.PatShingleton.com.


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"More Cool-Down Suggestions" http://www.wbrz.com/news/more-cool-down-suggestions-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/more-cool-down-suggestions-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 24 Jul 2015 7:05:19 PM Pat Shingleton

Previous columns, along with on-air mentions, have referenced ways to "beat-the-heat." Heat relief today will be needed as we flirt with a 100 degree high. There weren't very many options to stay cool during the summer months. My mother would instruct me to “fill the washtub” so that my brother Kevin would get a “cool-down” during some blistering weather in Pennsylvania. Kev enjoyed that until his lips turned purple. That same wash tub was also used to ice down beer and pop for summertime events. The washtub became obsolete when inflatable pools came along but Doug Kelly and his B-B gun ceased that endeavor. Another invention, the lawn sprinkler, offered another quick cool-down as we dashed through it. As we got older, the Ewing Park Swimming Pool provided heat relief. One of the best gifts to the neighborhood was the decision by the Shultz and the Lutz families to install backyard pools. I noted in a previous column that the turkey vulture provides an important service to our Louisiana highways by eliminating roadside trash. In the heat of the summer, these vultures can rapidly cool themselves by urinating on their claws. The black-tailed jackrabbit also has a built-in cooling apparatus. Due to its oversize ears, these trademark appendages increase the hare's audio range to avoid predators. Due to the abundance of blood vessels, its 7-inch ears are also a cooling mechanism that dissipate heat and regulate body temperature. The black-tailed jackrabbit also has a voracious appetite and can easily adapt to the heat and climate of Death Valley. Like many desert animals, it gets its water from plants. To adjust to seasonal changes it switches its grazing patterns by waiting until summer's heat to load-up on water filled cacti and grasses. It often consumes several times its body weight per day to stay hydrated.

 

 

 


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"The Dog Days, Ruff Stuff..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/the-dog-days-ruff-stuff-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/the-dog-days-ruff-stuff-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 23 Jul 2015 5:56:26 PM Pat Shingleton

Since June we have been showcasing our heat statistics that include 15 days of temperatures above 94 degree. This is on the top ten list for this category with a record 30 days noted from August 2nd through the 31st in 2011. Our consecutive overnight lows of 78 degrees makes us tied for first in that category. So every day in July we have been at 90 degrees or above. Traditionally during the Summer months we have 90 days in the 90s. Canis Major or Sirius was designated the "Dog Star" by ancient astronomers. Those crazy, ancient Romans believed that Sirius rose at sunrise and were convinced that the star was the cause of hot, sultry weather. To appease the rage of Sirius and believing that the star created the weather pattern, they sacrificed a brown dog. This began the reference of Dog Days and as the tradition progressed, the "Dog Days of Summer" ensued. Ancient Rome cataloged the Dog Days from July 24 through August 24 and The Old Farmer's Almanac has designated these 40 days from July 3rd to August 11th. Since June 20th, the sun has reached its highest point and slowly begins its track toward the equator. In 2012 there were two 101 degree days. Continue your regiment of beating the heat with lots of water, frequent breaks, and keep the air conditioning in check.  Also, make sure the pets are protected, especially the brown dogs. More columns are located at www.PatShingleton.com.


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Pat Shingleton: "Father Hurricane" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-father-hurricane--74810/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-father-hurricane--74810/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 22 Jul 2015 6:38:58 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The recent opening of the Cuban Embassy in Washington and future opening of the American Embassy in Havana suggests a renewal of relations long ago.  Meteorological relationships with Cuba and the United States were never breached following Fidel Castro's decision to align with the Soviet Union in the late 1950s. Cooperation is extended, especially during episodes of tropical storms and hurricanes. On July 22, 1893 Father Benito Vines died in Havana, Cuba. Father Vines is regarded as the preeminent hurricane scholar of the 19th century. As director of the observatory at Belen College in Havana in 1870, he catalogued meticulous weather observations and conditions, especially during tropical disturbances. His observations became a climatological catalog for future forecasts. Notations included excerpts expressing brick-red sunsets, pounding surf and evaporating cumulus clouds at the approach of a hurricane. His keen sense of weather allowed him to understand the dynamics of cyclones and by 1875 he issued accurate hurricane warnings. He is recognized as "Father Hurricane" and invented the Antilles Cyclonoscope for mariners.


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"I Scream, You Scream..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/i-scream-you-scream--74777/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/i-scream-you-scream--74777/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 21 Jul 2015 6:55:44 PM Pat Shingleton

My wife Mabyn and I enjoy taste tests... we've taste tested everything from wine and Irish Whiskey to homemade pickles and marinara sauce, made from our home grown tomatoes and cucumbers. As a "sidebar," imagine commuting every weekend from Baton Rouge to Pittsburgh... We did that from 1979 through 1981 and three benefits of those excursions were: Beto's Pizza, Tambellini's zucchini, apple cider and most importantly J & T Frozen Custard. The Krebs family held onto this marvelous tradition of creating an ice-cream-custard that is off-the-taste-testing-charts. A couple of years ago, we taste tested Breyer's, Blue Bell and Kleinpeter' Dairy's ice cream.  With our hot, muggy weather, you may have enjoyed a scoop or two recently and probably never thought of Abe Doumar, Albert Kabbaz, Arnold Fornachou or David Avayou. All claim that they... invented the ice cream cone. We are past the half-way point for Ice Cream Month.  The Library of Congress identifies Charles E. Menches as the inventor of the ice cream cone. He and his brother Frank also claim the invention of the hamburger in Hamburg, New York. To create the cone, the brothers originally topped Parisian waffles with ice cream. They then decided to wrap the warm waffles around a cone-shaped splicing tool designed for tent ropes. Syrian immigrant, Ernest Hamwi, operated a shop near the Menhces boys and insisted that when they ran out of ice cream cups, he assisted by providing them with "zalabia," that replicated another waffle concoction. In 1903, Italo Marchiony patented a pastry cup machine for ice cream.I would love to be in the parking lot of J and T Custard Stand in Ellwood City, PA., today, enjoying a three-scoop chocolate cone, visiting with DeWitt Krebs and bringing my 94-year-old Mom, Grandma Shirley, a couple of her favorite scoops.


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Pat Shingleton: "Johnstown Floods" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-johnstown-floods-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-johnstown-floods-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 20 Jul 2015 7:24:19 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Needed rain in California has prompted Flash Flooding in many locations. Strong downpours compromised a bridge and some of the shower activity could quiet persistent forest fires. Following the Johnstown Pennsylvania Flood of 1889, a flood control system was constructed in the Little Conemaugh Valley to withstand a 100 year flood. Experts declared that the city of Johnstown was flood-proof. On July 19, 1977 in West Taylor Township, northwest of Johnstown, a foot of rain fell and the Laurel Dam burst. The deluge was once again heading for Johnstown with a wall of water in its wake. The second Johnstown Flood in 88 years caused $325 million in damage in seven counties and killed 77. On a hillside above the city white crosses mark the graves of 777 unidentified dead from the flood of 1889, corresponding exactly to the month and year of the second-worst flood in Johnstown's history.


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Pat Shingleton: "Dry for Us, Wet for Them..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dry-for-us-wet-for-them-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dry-for-us-wet-for-them-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 17 Jul 2015 6:33:41 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The last time we had measurable rain was July 6th and that was four days after the anniversary-death of the Bishop of Winchester. I posted in my column then: "The Bishop of Winchester, a Benedictine monk, died July 2, 862. His deathbed request insisted that he be buried outside his cathedral so the rain would fall on his grave. Unfortunately, his intentions were not conveyed and he was entombed in a cathedral whereby a drought ensued. Once re-buried outside, the drought ended and the rain returned for 40 consecutive days." So, last Wednesday was St. Swithin's Day (July 15th) and the legend mentions "if it dost rain on St. Swithin's Day, for 40 days it will remain. If on the day it be fair, for 40 days will rain nae mair." If you've been following the British Open, noted in Friday's column, a pattern of wet weather began on July 2nd, and a chilly, windy, wet weather pattern has continued. As we flirt with a possible Heat Advisory this weekend and England experiences a continued wet weather scenario, the tradition of St. Swithin may be the culprit. At least that's my story and I'm sticking to it!  Also, lots of folks were complaining about the extreme amount of rain in June and July and on July 6th on the 4,5,6 and 10 PM weathercasts I decided to initiate a "dry-dance." With hands stretched to the ceiling the anchors joined in and sure enough, the pattern changed and the dry, hot weather locked-in. If the St. Swithin legend is accurate, dry weather should last until August 24th. If not, I'll do my classic rain dance.  You can have my columns home delivered at www.PatShingleton.com.

 


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Pat Shingleton: "The Old Course, The Old Forecast..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-old-course-the-old-forecast-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-old-course-the-old-forecast-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 16 Jul 2015 10:28:14 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

You may have noticed a few golfers wearing stocking hats.  Not in Baton Rouge, but in Fife, Scotland at The Old Course where weather has always been a factor. The 144th British Open began Thursday, the oldest of the four major tournaments, with daybreak showers then overcast conditions and temperatures at 66 degrees.  It's all about the wind for this tournament and they were kicking out of the south, south-west at 20 miles per hour and that gives you a feel-like temperature of 57 degrees. The participating professional golfers will dodge showers and chilly conditions throughout the weekend to hold the Claret. In years past, drought-like conditions resulted in fast greens and even faster fairways. These "links courses" have no trees, a few walls, plenty of deep, pot-bunkers and thick fescue grass. I have had the pleasure of playing golf, across the pond, on a few occasions. Some days may begin with rain and by the time you reach the scheduled course, sunshine could return. Ivar Quigley shared with me years ago, "If you can see the mountains in Killarney, it's about to rain and if you can't see them... it's raining."


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Pat Shingleton: "Croaks and Chirps" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-croaks-and-chirps-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-croaks-and-chirps-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 15 Jul 2015 6:23:16 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Years ago we attended an engagement party at our friends home, Jan and John Valluzzo.  Their backyard was decorated beautifully for the event complete with a symphony. It wasn't the prestigious Baton Rouge Symphony but a symphony of croaking frogs. The backyard racket, as John called it, was courtesy of the "rain" frogs and it wasn't an isolated incident for this event.  John hears them all the time and is attempting to include "frog's legs" to the menu at McDonald's.  (OK folks, let's not contact McDonald's, I'm tossing some humor around here.) From amphibians to insects, some believe that crickets chirp more in warm weather than during cold times. in 1897, physicist Amos Dolbear believed that the cricket was a thermometer. Not only do crickets chirp for a mate but they also correspond to "Dolbear's Law" which incorporates listening, counting and addition to determine the outside temperature. So here's how it works. The next time you are around some crickets, listen and count the number of chirps that you hear in 14 seconds. Once you record that number add the magic number 38 and it matches the Fahrenheit temperature. Eight years ago this formula was tested by Thomas Walker who wrote, "Cricket Field Study." Numerous crickets chirping at the same time compromises this endeavor. Baton Rouge's own cricket, "Cricket Neely" of Gino's Restaurant, uses his own crickets to not only calculate the temperature but also bar tabs.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Snow Story, or 2" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-snow-story-or-2-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-snow-story-or-2-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 14 Jul 2015 6:47:20 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The Mayor of Boston announced Tuesday that a 75 foot  pile-of-snow, from last Winter, has finally melted.  This mountain of snow was removed from Boston's streets and roads following the cities record accumulations in January and February. Where Boston had a lot, Alaska didn't have enough. The Bulletin of the the American Meteorological Society reports that for the second time in its 42-year history, the famous Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race was forced to change course. On some trail locations, the lack of snow caused dangerous sledding, with many spots displaying bare ground. Each year the course alternates between Willow and Fairbanks, Alaska, and the last time the location was disrupted because of "no-snow" was 2003. The Willow route is  19 miles shorter than it typically would have been in an odd-numbered year. Course officials made the determination after observing the course from airplanes and helicopters. Sections of the trail also had exposed boulders and rocks that hadn't been identified in more than 20 years. Dog mushers also checked the trail conditions and even talked to their dogs. (I put that in there to determine if you were still reading.) Without snow, these dogs, like most dogs, become distracted with outdoor objects. The race is always scheduled for March 7th when snow depths are traditionally high. Anchorage normally averages 50 inches of snow but only 20 had fallen. The race should have been held in Boston where 90 inches of snow had fallen.


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Pat Shingleton: "Heat Plus Humidity Equals..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-heat-plus-humidity-equals-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-heat-plus-humidity-equals-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 13 Jul 2015 6:48:05 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Parishes north of Alexandria and counties north of McComb are struggling with a Heat Advisory.  The criteria for the National Weather Service to designate this advisory include: a heat index greater than 108 degrees for at least two hours.  Your heat index was designed and implemented by the U.S. Army to determine how a soldier's body would react in elevated temperatures and elevated humidity. Keeping within the context of heat, Death Valley National Park incorporates 5,000 square miles in California's Mojave Desert in the Sierra Nevada mountain range. The range includes 11,000 foot above sea level peaks. Badwater Basin is 28 feet below sea level. This area records an average rainfall of about two inches per year. Cooler, moisture-laden air from the Pacific rapidly dries and heats as it slides toward the valley floor, a process known as adiabatic warming. Weather observations in the area date back to 1861 and official record keeping began in 1911 when the U.S. Weather Bureau established a reporting station at Furnace Creek Ranch. On July 10, 1913 a maximum temperature of 134 degrees was recorded, remaining the hottest on record for the United States.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Stinky Acronym..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-stinky-acronym-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-stinky-acronym-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 10 Jul 2015 6:45:41 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Recently Amazon was considering home delivery of ordered items to purchaser's doorsteps. Cargo ships of old are massive delivery vessels today transporting shipping containers that hold thousands of items for worldwide use. Supplies in the 16th and 17th Century were also transported by ship. One product, needed and essential to agricultural interests, was manure. Manure gatherers would collector and bundle the lighter, dry manure. These bundles resembled bales of hay and were stored below deck for a long journey at sea. In the open sea, storms, loaded with salt water would unload on the decks of ships, soaking cargo in the lower holds. These episodes of wet weather would change the composition of the manure from dry to wet, returning it to its original form. This process would activate the fermentation process and rapidly increase methane gas. A ship's lantern, always in close proximity to the stowed manure, would interact with the gas, causing explosions and the loss of ships and seamen. To address this problem, the British Admiralty issued a directive that ordered ship captains and sailors to stow the manure bundles up high and off the lower decks to eliminate water contact. The decree also insisted that all bundles be stamped with an acronym identifying; Stow High In Transit. If you're boating this weekend, like my friend Grey Hammett, he suggests that you always Stow your perishables High In Transit. As mentioned before, home delivery of my columns is available by clicking www.PatShingleton.com.

 

 


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Pat Shingleton: "Chillying Out In July" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-chillying-out-in-july-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-chillying-out-in-july-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 9 Jul 2015 6:25:13 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

During my tenure at the NBC Affiliate in Pittsburgh from 1979 through 1981, I televised my "On-Location Forecasts."  Prior to my weather-casts there, this idea originated in Baton Rouge and provided me an opportunity to showcase a forecast within a community event or related occasion. I remember a January afternoon in Pittsburgh, complete with piles of snow and near zero temperatures.  I stood on a diving board at a local swimming pool with the "shot" identifying lots of drifting snow on benches and chairs and me in a swim suit. I was attempting to give my viewers a chilling experience and "taped" the segment, later running this On-Location Forecast in mid-July.  The presentation included a daytime high of 85 degrees.  Obviously I needed the right day to air the segment and match the prediction done that day. Yesterday, while clearing my desk,  I found an article in Weatherwise Magazine that noted eleven locations in the United States from December, 2014.  Jamestown, North Dakota recorded a temperature of -24 degrees F on the first day of the month. On December 10th, 11.8 inches of snow landed on Syracuse while Walla Walla, Washington hit 71 degrees. Mt. Shasta City, California picked up 4.06 inches of snow on December 11th and Klawock, Alaska reported a daytime high of 52 degrees. Tallahassee recorded 7.44 inches of rain on December 23rd and a day later Salisbury, Maryland hit 70 degrees.  Savannah, Georgia made it to 80 degrees on December 28th. my columned experiences are available from www.patshingleton.com.


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Pat Shingleton:"What About Those Old Sayings" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-what-about-those-old-sayings-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-what-about-those-old-sayings-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 8 Jul 2015 6:44:01 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Prior to the assistance of satellites, radar or other technological advances, folks would rely on the sky, plants and animals for weather predictions. Success in matching nature with weather expectations also created a variety of weather expressions an folklore.  You've heard the old adage: "Red sky at night, sailor's delight...Red sky in the morning, sailors take warning." Close to sunset, the western sky is especially clear, creating beautiful red sunsets. As the sun goes down it bops through the lower atmosphere, hitting scattered particles of dust, smoke and pollution. In this "scattering" process the shorter wavelengths of light, depicted as violets and blues, are eliminated with the longer wavelengths of reds and oranges remaining. Sinking air gathers the contaminants closer to earth, making the sunset even redder. This is caused by high pressure that brings fair weather. If the eastern sky is red in the morning, high pressure has passed, replaced by low pressure, clouds, rain and possibly hefty thundershowers, that we have experienced recently.  "Mare's tails and mackerel scales make tall ships take in their sails." This adage refers to the sky. Sailors of old could only rely on the sky, wind and wave heights to determine their weather. A mackerel sky means that cirrocumulus clouds are present. These cloud types occur prior to a warm frontal passage. An approaching warm front shifts the winds from northeast to east then southwest and west. This would require the captain or skipper of the ship to reef or take in their sails. "Clear moon, frost soon," suggests that the earth will cool rapidly as daytime heat escapes at night. With limited or no cloud cover, there's no blanket to hold the day's heat close to the surface. As the temperature drops and winds subside, the falling temperature will create the frost.


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"Tambora, A Year Without Summer..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/tambora-a-year-without-summer-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/tambora-a-year-without-summer-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 7 Jul 2015 9:51:42 PM Pat Shingleton

In April, 1815, Mount Tambora, on the island of Sumbawa, erupted. Historians report that this incident was the most explosive eruption in 10,000 years. At the end of the volcano's convulsions, 4,200 feet of its 13,000 foot height were gone as 25 cubic miles of ash was released into the atmosphere. Within an area of 200 miles from the eruption site there was total darkness for three days. Mariners reported a one-foot-thick layer of volcanic debris on the sea surface that lasted four years. The immediate fatalities from the eruption totaled 10,000 with an additional 82,000 deaths on Sumbawa and neighboring islands due to starvation. This could possibly have been a "global cooling" event and because of the eruption "The Year Without Summer" occurred. It was the most explosive eruption in 10,000 years. The volcano discharged dust and sulfurous gases that spread around the globe. The diary of Hiram Harwood of Bennington, Vermont, noted that on June 11, 1817, frigid temperatures found New Englanders building "roaring fires in their hearth, as killing frosts turned leaves and gardens black." Once the cold spell ended, the farmers replanted their crops only to have temperatures plummeting again in July. On August 21, hard frosts killed crops in Boston and a snowstorm whitened the peaks of the Green Mountains. The eruption inflicted climatic changes all over the Northern Hemisphere.


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Pat Shingleton: "Records, Babies and Threshold" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-records-babies-and-threshold-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-records-babies-and-threshold-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 7 Jul 2015 5:28:02 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

We have enough, if not too much, and California will need much more for years-to-come. Baton Rouge averages 67.5 inches of rain per year and as of this writing, 41.6 inches has been logged at Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport. With fewer showers and more heat, we'll rely on our precious surplus of water to keep us cool and hydrated. Kids are enjoying the cooling pool and ice water seems to be the drink-of-choice throughout the day at our favorite restaurants and "watering-holes." Many restaurants out west only serve H2O if it is requested while others determine if you prefer bottled or "house" water. You may want to head to your favorite snowball stand today, last Sunday the lines were long and the wait was 25 minutes to get one at Rainbow Delights. You can also enjoy a dip in the pool or a shower from the backyard hose-pipe. Years ago, the man of the house enjoyed the privilege of clean water for his bath, followed by his sons, then the women and finally the babies. The dirty water posed a threat of losing a family member, leading to the saying: "Don't throw the baby out with the bath water." Only the wealthy had slate floors and during wet weather a layer of thresh was scattered on the slippery surface for better footing. During the winter months, piles of thresh would cover the doorway and once opened, the thresh would spill onto the entryway, creating the word "threshold." My columns are available for home delivery at www.patshingleton.com.


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Pat Shingleton: "Independence..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-independence-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-independence-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 3 Jul 2015 6:58:50 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Buried in today's column are five nouns depicting events related to the Fourth of July. On July 4, 1856, E Meriam, writing for the New York Times, noted that over 67 consecutive years, rain had fallen on thirteen Independence Days. As noted in yesterday's column,  it was 102 degrees on July 4, 1860 and if Madison and Monroe had been in Charleston, South Carolina, they may have learned that eight people died of sunstroke, including two German Fusiliers. A tornado hit Washington, D.C. ripping off roofs for blocks on July 4, 1874. Thomas Jefferson once thought that smoke from fireworks and other explosives could activate rain. On July 4, 1806, an earthquake occurred in Schenectady, New York, along with the rumble of distant thunder. In years-gone-by, I remember the weather being just about perfect for the Fourth of July. There was always a large picnic in the backyard. Two or three wash tubs were stocked with drinks, kept cold from the blocks of ice from the local ice house. On the grill, foot-long hot dogs and burgers  were sizzlin' as relatives delivered their special recipes of potato salad, baked beans and casseroles. My grandfather made sure there was a chilled watermelon in the basement. After participating in a baseball game or marching in a local parade, the backyard was large enough for wiffle-ball games, volleyball or touch football. At dusk we'd walk a hundred yards and from Longview Drive on Wiley Hill in Ellwood City, Pennsylvania, we would look out over a valley as fireworks blasted skyward from the Conquenessing Country Club below. Other displays were viewed from the Blue Sky and Spotlight 88 Drive-In Theatres. The day ended with a trek to J and T Frozen Custard Stand. Our forecast for the Baton Rouge area changes after a two-day dry-out, showers pop this afternoon, expecting a wrap-up by early evening. Home delivery of Pat's column is available at: www.PatShingleton.com. 

 

 


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Pat Shingleton: "The Day and the Weather" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-day-and-the-weather--74266/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-day-and-the-weather--74266/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 3 Jul 2015 3:27:52 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Weather expectations in Philadelphia for Independence Day include scattered showers, evening clearing and 78 degrees for the daytime-high. James Heintze researched historical weather conditions for the Fourth of July. He found that in New York City from 1789 to 1855 rain fell on thirteen July "Fourths." On July 4, 1860, eight members of the German Fusiliers donned full military dress and died from sunstroke in a Charleston, S.C. parade. On July 4, 1874 the New York Herald reported that "whole blocks of houses" in Washington, D.C., lost roofs when a tornado ripped through the city. In Boston on July 4, 1831, The National Intelligencer reported that, "The Northern Lights were beautifully vivid at the close of the 4th." The hottest Independence days include Palm Springs and Las Vegas. Schenectady, N.Y. reported an earthquake on July 4, 1806. Baton Rouge will place in the weather almanac a daytime high of 91, with returning afternoon showers. Showers should wrap-up by 8:00 PM, providing good viewing for the traditional "Fireworks on the Mississippi," an event that WBRZ has sponsored since its inception. My columns are archived at www.PatShingleton.com.


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