WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Weather - Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2014, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Tue, 16 Sep 2014 23:09:16 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Your Data, This Storm..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-your-data-this-storm-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-your-data-this-storm-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 15 Sep 2014 3:42:45 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The Gulf water temperature is at its highest, conducive for tropical storm development. Researchers at the University of Miami have joined forces to achieve dual goals. Atmospheric scientists and marine biologists are predicting the severity of tropical storms and evaluating fish migration. Since 2001, one team has been tagging large pelagic fish such as tarpon, with satellite linked sensors that measure ocean temperature, depth, light level and salinity. Sharks have also been tagged for the last four years as researchers noticed they follow a line of water that is 79 degrees F, a reading that is also the lower-bound temperature for tropical storms. Data is transmitted in real time and fish in a storm area will assist in predicting storms.


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Pat Shingleton: "Thirsty Grapes" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-thirsty-grapes-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-thirsty-grapes-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 14 Sep 2014 7:18:27 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

California feeds the nation in a variety of agricultural products. Typically and on average they receive around 30 inches of rainfall. As they await their rainy season, that begins in October, last February there had only been 3.5 inches of rain. Recent rain events have caused flooding in some locations. The state's winemakers are very nervous and in Napa Valley grape farmers normally receive all of their water from rainfall that collects in rivers and reservoirs. Blame it on a ridge of high pressure that has diverted the polar jet stream. Last year was the driest on record since the 1840s and grape farmers are considering new approaches. Without compromising quality, farms may be downsized while watering patterns are possibly altered.


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Pat Shingoeton: "Just One Pane" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingoeton-just-one-pane-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingoeton-just-one-pane-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 14 Sep 2014 6:45:47 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingoeton:

Saturday's column shared the events of The Cathedral of the Nativity in Biloxi. Erected 26 feet above sea-level, it endured 145 m.p.h. winds that rattled its beautiful stained glass windows during Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. Father Tony Arguelles road out the storm inside the Cathedral and provided testimony to Father Vic Messina. The wind-field suddenly blew-out one stained glass pane in the apex of the church that depicted St. Theresa of Lizoux, known as St. Theresa of the Child Jesus. At that moment, the pressure inside the Cathedral immediately diminished and the remaining windows stopped rumbling. The Church recognizes St. Theresa's death on Sept. 30, 1897 at the age of 24 and her vows of ministry in doing good on Earth.


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Pat Shingleton: "Just One Pane" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-just-one-pane-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-just-one-pane-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 13 Sep 2014 9:46:22 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Saturday's column shared the events of The Cathedral of the Nativity in Biloxi. Erected 26 feet above sea-level, it endured 145 m.p.h. winds that rattled its beautiful stained glass windows during Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. Father Tony Arguelles road out the storm inside the Cathedral and provided testimony to Father Vic Messina. The wind-field suddenly blew-out one stained glass pane in the apex of the church that depicted St. Theresa of Lizoux, known as St. Theresa of the Child Jesus. At that moment, the pressure inside the Cathedral immediately diminished and the remaining windows stopped rumbling. The Church recognizes St. Theresa's death on Sept. 30, 1897 at the age of 24 and her vows of ministry in doing good on Earth.


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Pat Shingleton: "Looking Back Nine Years..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-looking-back-nine-years-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-looking-back-nine-years-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 12 Sep 2014 4:03:20 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

This morning's column looks back to 2005. Catholics recognized the birth of the Blessed Mother this past week. At Noon Mass on Sept. 7, 2005, Father Vic Messina incorporated his homily into the Hurricane Katrina's landfall. He referenced The Cathedral of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Biloxi and the foresight of its builders. It was erected 26 feet above sea-level at the city's highest point. During Katrina, Father Tony Arguelles remained inside and provided testimony to Father Vic that the popular stained glass windows were rattling, shaking and bending in 145 m.p.h. winds. Suddenly, the wind field blew out a pane depicting St. Theresa of the Child Jesus. Father Tony reported a distinct change in the Cathedral in tomorrow's column.


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Pat Shingleton: "No Beets, No Cola..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-no-beets-no-cola-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-no-beets-no-cola-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 11 Sep 2014 3:59:01 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

A refreshment expert recently suggested that climate change may be impacting popular refreshments. Extreme weather affects Coco-Cola's supply of sugar cane, sugar beets and citrus fruits. On a related note, Nike shuttered factories in Thailand due to flooding. The New York Times reports that Jeffrey Seabright, Vice-President for environment and water resources for Coke, referenced events related to climate change, including droughts and 100-year floods, every two years, that have retarded production of the company's goods. Experts believe that climate change will continue to threaten the global economy. Coca-Cola has embraced water-conservation technology and Nike uses a synthetic material that is less dependent on the weather.


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Pat Shingleton: "September Remembers" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-september-remembers-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-september-remembers-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 10 Sep 2014 4:01:13 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

This is the first time since 1992 without a tropical storm in September as we watch a low in the Bahamas that could slide into the Gulf of Mexico this weekend. Statistically 37% of named storms, 47% of hurricanes and 55% of major hurricanes occur in September. Before "naming" hurricanes, Louisiana storms with September landfalls include: the Sept. 22, 1909 Storm, the Sept. 21, 1947, the Sept. 6, 1949 Storm. All made landfall in close proximity of Baton Rouge and New Orleans. Others include: Flossy-Sept. 25, 1956, Fern-Sept. 13, 1971, Carmen-Sept. 9, 1974, Babe-Sept.9, 1977, Elena-Sept. 2, 1985 and Florence-Sept, 9, 1988. Many of our readers remember Sept, 13, 1965 when Betsy hit New Orleans and another September storm, Rita, in 2005.


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Pat Shingleton: "Less Water Means Rationing..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-less-water-means-rationing-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-less-water-means-rationing-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 9 Sep 2014 3:37:27 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The current drought in the west took many by surprise and has now revealed the inadequacies of programs designed to distribute Colorado River water. The New York Times reports that this drought is now into its second decade and has shrunk the river and the reservoirs it feeds. Last June, officials cut back on water flowing from Lake Powell to Lake Mead, the largest reservoir in the nation, and a source of water for 20 million people in the Southwest. It is expected that in 2015, water from the lake will be rationed, a procedure that has never been implemented. Last January the level was 1,200 feet above sea level and rationing procedures are initiated at 1,075 feet. Studies show the River's flow was 15% higher in the 1900s.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Shell Game" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-shell-game-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-shell-game-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 8 Sep 2014 4:24:50 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Love bugs are back and another sound hints at the end of summer and the early beginnings of autumn. We when were kids, we'd collect what we called "locust" shells from a variety of tree trunks. These insects weren't locusts but Cicadas and the sound they make comes only from the male. Tymbals, attached to the stomach muscles of the Cicada vibrate to create the sound. This begins the process of exiting its shell. Once we would hear the sound we'd look to areas of the tree to watch it fly out and away. Kids do goofy things and many of us would collect and attach the shells to a shirt or sweatshirt to aggravate the neighborhood girls as "Eeks" were common. In the upcoming weeks the Whoolyworm's stripe could be a Winter predictor.


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Pat Shingleton: The Casket, the Storm http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-casket-the-storm/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-casket-the-storm/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 7 Sep 2014 2:40:52 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: The Casket, the Storm

Sunday's column noted the story of actor Charles Coughlin who died in 1899 during a performance in Galveston. Before his death a fortune teller forewarned of his demise in a southern city at the height of his career. As noted in a previous column, immediately after his burial the Hurricane of 1899 hit Galveston, sending his casket into the Gulf of Mexico and later absorbed by the Gulf Stream's Loop Current. The coffin drifted up the Atlantic seaboard. Eight years later, fishermen discovered the casket at Prince Edward Island, Canada, where Coughlin once lived. Banjo Bob Cargo's story noted another twist to this saga in that the popular actor was also estranged from his wife but desired to return one day to a lover on Prince Edward Island.


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Pat Shingleton: A Casket-For Openers http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-casket-for-openers/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-casket-for-openers/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 6 Sep 2014 2:13:04 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: A Casket-For Openers

Bagpiper, casket and vault peddler, Banjo Bob Cargo, noted that if I post this story, free bagpipe lessons. In 1899, classical actor Charles Coughlin, from Prince Edward Island, Canada, relocated to Galveston, against his family's wishes. Before pursuing his career he consulted a fortune teller, forewarning that he would die at the height of his fame in a southern city. The fortune teller said he would not rest-in-peace until he was returned to his place of birth. Performing with an acting troupe in Galveston, he collapsed, died and was buried. After the burial, the Hurricane of 1899 hit Galveston washing Charles' casket into the Gulf of Mexico. Caught up in the Loop Current, the casket moved along the Atlantic seaboard. More Monday.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Formula..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-formula-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-formula-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 5 Sep 2014 3:40:29 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Autumn begins in 16 days, the traditional launch of "The Farmer's Almanac." I've noted their predictions in recent columns. Robert B. Thomas started "The Old Farmer's Almanac." In 1818, David Young began this almanac by extrapolating a combination of lunar cycles, planet positions and sunspot maximums to create a weather formula for sections of the United States. Clothed in secrecy, the forecast has been protected by a host of editors for 198 years. Current editor, Sondra Duncan, along with publisher Peter Geiger; protect the location and identity of reclusive weather soothsayer - Caleb Weatherby. In turn, Caleb reportedly protects the ago-old "formula" for six zones ranging from the Pacific to the Atlantic and the Great Lakes to the Gulf.


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Pat Shingleton: "Predictions..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-predictions-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-predictions-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 4 Sep 2014 4:34:45 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Thursday's column reviewed the accuracy of the Farmer's Almanac. The Almanac's predictions for 2015 predict wetter-than-normal conditions for the Gulf Coast and Florida. Cold and unsettled weather is expected for November and December. Florida and the Carolinas will be "in the crosshairs" for tropical storms in late July with another threat for Florida in late August and the Gulf Coast in early September. The Texas Coast receives a threat in mid-September. Cold temperatures and frigid conditions are predicted from the Northern Plains into the Great Lakes. January and early February will find arctic air dropping temperatures across the Northern Plains to 40 degrees below zero with snow showers and accumulations for the Great Lakes.


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Pat Shingleton: "Swinging Signals and Mast Arms" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-swinging-signals-and-mast-arms-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-swinging-signals-and-mast-arms-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 3 Sep 2014 3:54:17 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Video coverage of tropical storms, hurricanes and damaging thunderstorms include the swinging and swaying of traffic lights. Hurricane video also offers swinging stoplights, dangling and crashing from the hurricane's force. Wire and cable connected street lights are a thing-of-the-past in Baton Rouge. In the 1980s, Miami was the first city to install "Mast Arms." When eight hurricanes hit Florida in 2004 and 2005, Mast Arms remained intact. These devices enclose wiring and stoplights into one unit, eliminating the needed repair for span-wired traffic signals. Florida and other coastal states require Mast Arms at all intersections within ten miles of their respective coasts. Mast arms have more damage from car crashes than crashing storms.


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Pat Shingleton: "Of Interest to Farmer's" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-of-interest-to-farmer-s-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-of-interest-to-farmer-s-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 2 Sep 2014 3:55:07 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The 2015 Farmer's Almanac reviewed their predictions made in July of 2014. Managing Editor, Sondra Duncan and Editor, Peter Geiger validated their winter predictions. They noted that the bitterly cold Winter seemed to have taken the long-range forecasters completely by surprise and referenced NOAA's Climate Prediction Center advanced forecast predicting "above normal temperatures through January 2014 across 48 states. In the 198 years of the Almanac's history, publishers received interest and scrutiny in their Super Bowl XLVIII blizzard prediction. The event occurred eight hours after the game ended. They were accurate in their February 12th-15th winter storm that sent a variety of snow, ice and rain from, the Southeast into New England.


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Pat Shingleton: "Laboring on Labor Day..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-laboring-on-labor-day-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-laboring-on-labor-day-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 1 Sep 2014 3:12:19 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

As noted in a previous column, this hurricane caused damage in the upper Florida Keys and a surge of 20 feet. Its winds leveled buildings in Islamorada as numerous World War I veteran's lots their lives due to the storm surge. They were constructing the Key West Extension of the Florida East Coast Railroad. Prior to the naming of storms this was known as the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935. Other Labor Day storms that pounded Louisiana include Isaac, that made the list in 2012. Gustav posted the highest winds ever recorded while Lili and Rita contributed their share of destruction to our state. Labor Day celebrations and relaxation were limited on this date, two years ago, as clean-up chores continued, due to Isaac. Tropical Storm Dolly, today.


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Pat Shingleton: That Splash is a Biggin http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-that-splash-is-a-biggin/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-that-splash-is-a-biggin/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 31 Aug 2014 2:30:01 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton: That Splash is a Biggin

A Labor Day tradition was an invitation from Leonard "Dutch" Shultz. He had a backyard swimming pool and before episodes of Indian Summer, the day was usually hot. Guests contributed a variety of summertime recipes. Their adjacent yard provided additional space for related activities but the pool was the place-to-be. The Labor Day Party included a seasonal event that got everyone's attention in sight and sound. Dorothy "Dot" Biggins was a robust lady with a robust personality to match. When the pool was filled with kids and adults, Dot sped down the side of the pool, went airborne and performed the greatest "cannonball" ever witnessed. The sound was incredible, the splash enormous. Dutch kept a hose "at-the-ready" to refill the pool.


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Pat Shingleton: "Hemmed pants and rising water..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hemmed-pants-and-rising-water-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hemmed-pants-and-rising-water-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 30 Aug 2014 2:49:55 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The first day of school, "way back when," was the day-after Labor Day. Our school year schedule didn't include "days-off" for Mardi Gras and "Spring Breaks." Like most families we subscribed to the traditions of new school clothes, and lunch buckets. Before backpacks, an old belt transported our books for "night work" or better known as home work. School clothes were purchased from Zayre's, an inexpensive store chain that met our parents budgetary school needs. Mom insisted that our trouser length be longer than needed. She would "hem them up," and "un-hem" them as the school year progressed. The hem lines were evidence of our increasing height, inch-by-inch. I used the trouser hem lines to measure and catalog monthly rainfall totals.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Unnamed Storm..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-unnamed-storm-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-unnamed-storm-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 29 Aug 2014 4:02:36 PM Pat Shingleton Hurricanes Andrew, Camille, Betsy, Gustav and Rita became the comparative storms as we move forward. Another storm was chronicled in a book released in 2008, entitled "Hemingway's Hurricane: The Great Florida Keys Storm of 1935" by Phil Scott. It's called Hemingway's Hurricane because the famous author lived 80 miles southwest of Key West where he rode out the storm and journaled his experiences from August 30th to September 4th, 1935. Scott's angle on the book includes the lives of 700 World War I veterans who relocated to Florida in 1925 under the Federal Emergency Relief Organization to assist in public works projects. This storm ravaged three veteran's camps causing more than 400 deaths; long before lead-time alerts and evacuations.


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Pat Shingleton: "The 'K' Storm..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-k-storm-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-k-storm-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 28 Aug 2014 4:01:19 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The column today includes an excerpt, presented nine years ago on this date and Katrina's landfall. "After 48 hours of on-air coverage of Katrina, this devastating, catastrophic storm, some comments. In every hurricane conference attended, the New Orleans "model" has occurred. The worst-case scenario Monday morning mirrored expectations of the Hurricane Center in Miami. Numerous storms have skirted and hit New Orleans including: the October 10, 1837 Hurricane, the September 22, 1909 Hurricane, the October 2, 1915 Hurricane and the September 6, 1948 Hurricane. Named storms include Hilda in October-1964, Betsy-September 12, 1965, Fern-September, 1971, Bob-July 12, 1979, Elena-September 2,1965, Juan-October 29, 1985 and Florence-Sept. 9, 1988.


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