WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2015, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Mon, 25 May 2015 09:05:05 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Gramps..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gramps-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gramps-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 22 May 2015 5:55:17 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Our grandfather, Bert Price, lived with us in the same house that his children were born. Our Dad returned from service in World War II, was away from our Mom for the duration and like many, got engaged and married. Mom was committed to taking care of her Dad in his house, even after our Dad desired to relocate to Seattle on a basketball scholarship. They decided to make their home in Ellwood City, PA. Dad bought our grandfather's house,  a retired "railroader" at US Steel. Gramps chewed Mailpouch tobacco, baby-sat his grandsons, gardened, and read newspapers: The Ellwood City Ledger, Pittsburgh Post Gazette, and The Grit, from front to back. He watched only two television shows: Lawrence Welk and Studio Wrestling, calling it "that thar rastling show."  He never had a driver's license, relying on our Dad and oldest brother, Denis, to collect him and deliver him to the local pharmacy and the Central Cafe. Wherever Gramps desired to go, he walked, sometimes "into town."  Mom would "chew him out" when he walked home, up Wiley Hill, when he had one too many...To give Mom a break he would walk me out to Shirling's Store, to visit with his buddy Jack, and buy me a frozen Snicker's Bar. When he wasn't walking, he was sitting on the front steps watching the cars - waving at them when they honked and spittin' tobacco juice.. No matter what the season in western Pennsylvania, he wore the same clothes: long johns, coveralls, flannel shirt with suspenders, boots, work gloves and his railroad hat. Our recent episodes of afternoon-evening thunderstorms reminded me of Gramps when we would sit on the back porch glider during a thunderstorm. Not saying anything, just sitting, gliding and watching. Great memories...


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Remembering..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-remembering-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-remembering-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 21 May 2015 6:38:52 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Within many situations, projects, assignments and directives we are asked for assistance and solicit the assistance of others. In the early stages of "The St. Patrick's Day Parade, The Wearin' of the Green," I struggled with securing resources to advance the parade. That's when T.J. Moran and Gary Mockler came to my rescue. They too recognized the importance of recognizing the day for the Patron Saint of Ireland and showcasing the heritage of the Irish. Today and tomorrow we will pause to extend our appreciation to T.J. through and with his family and friends. T.J. leaves a tremendous legacy to Baton Rouge in many levels of philanthropy. He was always there for me whether it was Coats for Kids, Fill-A-Prescription or our Children's Miracle Network Telethons, years ago. With this noted, cemeteries provide a lasting history of our ancestors and an historical catalog for further investigation of our ancestors. Years ago a couple of college students decided to design a lasting memorial with Eternal Reefs. The concept includes securing the ashes of the deceased, adding them to concrete and placing them in artificial reefs. Owners of the company claim that their "reef balls" can help repair environmental damage by creating a perpetual reef. The balls are designed to last 500 years and are equipped with holes to dissipate currents and generate a special surface texture that encourages growth of coral and other marine life. The "reef balls" have been installed offshore, along the Gulf Coast, creating the Great Egg Reef.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Cool, Clear, Water..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-cool-clear-water-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-cool-clear-water-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 20 May 2015 6:26:52 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

For many years I have been asked to assist in taste testing water. I vividly remember myself, the late Fran Spain and others determining the best tasting water. Samples were collected from numerous locations around the United States. Every judge selected our Baton Rouge "tap" water as the best in taste and smell. A few years ago, Baton Rouge water was judged the second best water in the country. Many companies along the chemical corridor have now switched from tapping our aquifers to tapping the Mississippi River for industrial water needs. There remain a few plants that haven't conformed. Under the leadership of California's Governor, Jerry Brown, drastic measures have been enacted to conserve water there. An easy solution is in their backyard. According to the Sacramento Bee, over a billion gallons of treated wastewater from 250 water recycling facilities, are unloaded into the Pacific Ocean each year. The treated wastewater can be recycled for irrigation, toilet flushing, groundwater replenishment. The state's goal is to recycle 2.5 million acre feet of water by 2030. We may suffer through the heat, steam and pesky afternoon thundershowers but the fresh water we enjoy now, from our aquifers , is 2000 years old.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Delivering Water at Warp Speed..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-delivering-water-at-warp-speed-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-delivering-water-at-warp-speed-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 19 May 2015 7:37:37 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Star Trek's Captain Kirk, better known as William Shatner has proposed an interesting water-plan. Through a program called Kickstarter, proposes raising $30 billion to fund a massive pipeline to pump water from Seattle to the nation's largest reservoir at Lake Mead, Nevada. In the late 1980s, Alaskan governor, Wally Hickel proposed the construction of a 1,400-mile-long, 14 foot diameter pipeline to sell California 1.3 trillion gallons of water each year. Further studies indicated that once the water reached California each gallon would cost 10 times the amount of a gallon of desalinated water. California Governor Jerry Brown has initiated measures  toward reducing the state's water usage. By example, restaurants can be fined $500 for serving a customer a glass of water if they haven't asked for it. Drinking water for California's 38 million residents accounts for one-tenth of one percent of the state's water needs. It was recently reported that the worst offenders are bottled water companies. Nestle bottles groundwater in five bottling plants, from Morongo reservation, accused of stealing water from the state's national forests for over 25 years without needed permits. The state's water board doesn't track water usage.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Dew Dew..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dew-dew-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dew-dew-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 18 May 2015 10:28:35 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Dew is water that is condensed onto grass and other objects near the ground. We are very familiar with dew in South Louisiana. There's a folktale or two about the magical qualities of dew. Dew has been used as a lotion for sore, itchy eyes and skin diseases. It has also been used to strengthen sickly children and is believed to heal gout and sharpen ones eyesight, especially if it is collected from the leaves of fennel. A young girl must gather dew prior to sunrise, from the ground under an oak tree, for beauty and good luck. Those that wash their face in dew from a Hawthorn tree at sunrise on the Celtic festival of Beltane will experience beauty for a year. The Victorians gathered early-morning dew in their hands and rubbed it on their faces to remove freckles. Witches in Scotland, collected dew with a hair tie and hung it in the barn to increase milk production. There's another "Dew" that isn't weather related, except for a main ingredient - water. It's distilled and is known as Tallamore Dew.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Night Crawlers" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-night-crawlers--72795/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-night-crawlers--72795/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 15 May 2015 10:26:49 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

While sitting on the back porch and watching Friday's showers and thundershowers, I drifted back to days gone by. I remember earthworms being flushed out of the ground from episodes of rain and showers. When I was a young lad, we called them "night-crawlers."  These were large earthworms that didn't like the wet but fish loved ‘em. If a shower didn't get them moving upward, the garden hose did. By wetting-down a section of the yard around 7 p.m. the night-crawler harvest was underway by 10 p.m. Some of our friends had worm containers along with any and all needed fishing equipment. In Florida's Apalachicola National Forest the collection of worms is still practiced under the mantle of "grunting."  Grunters rub a curved steel bar over a wooden stake that is inserted into the ground to create a strange "humming" sound. The vibrations annoy the worms and drive them to the surface. Thousands pour out of the ground, becoming prime fishing bait. Local grunters earn $1,000 in three hours for 5,000 worms. Due to today's showers and returning episodes into the evening, you may not be fishing today but might enjoy some grunting.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Ahhh Choo..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ahhh-choo-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ahhh-choo-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 14 May 2015 10:23:01 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The response to someone sneezing is, "God bless you," or "Bless You." This practice originated in 77 AD when it was believed that a person's soul could be tossed from their body when they sneezed. It also opened the body for a Devil invasion. Through the centuries it was also believed that the heart stops beating during a sneeze and could possibly be exacerbated by holding back the sneeze. "Gesundheit," following a sneeze means "good luck or all the best." The wind speed from a common cough has been determined to be around 270 miles per hour and a sneeze is around 100 miles per hour. The Natural Resources Defense Council recently reported that one-in-three Americans reside in the sneeziest and wheeziest cities and regions in the country. Ragweed, pollen and ozone contribute the increase in sneezing. Researchers believe that as climate change warms the planet, millions more Americans could become ill with severe respiratory allergies and asthma. The report has targeted 35  cities where exposure to ragweed and ozone smog is at its highest. The most vulnerable regions are the Los Angeles Basin, the St. Louis area, the Great Lakes Region, the Mid-Atlantic and the Northeast. Of the 35 cities not one is located in Louisiana, Mississippi, or Alabama. Orlando and Dallas are the only cities in Florida and Texas. Four cities are in Pennsylvania, six in Ohio and Los Angeles is the only standout for California. I find it interesting that when I hear folks sneeze during religious ceremonies, no one responds with "God Bless You..."


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Finding Water and Throwing Apples" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-finding-water-and-throwing-apples-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-finding-water-and-throwing-apples-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 13 May 2015 6:40:29 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In the old days, attempts to locate water, was called dowsing and a dowsing rod, divining rod or witching rod was used.  The rod was a Y shaped, hand-held branch that supposedly jumped upon above-ground contact with a below-ground water source. Historically, there appears to be some credibility in the accuracy and success of this type of water-finding application. Using his Barlow knife, our grandfather, Bert Price,  would whittle the rod to educate us as to its benefits. Usually the "Y" shaped piece of wood was collected from one of our maple, apple, pear or cherry trees. After testing its suspected use for water discoveries we would become bored with this directive and advanced another application for the device. We would use the rods as "apple launchers." Jamming an apple on the rod and whipping it like a fishing rod would propel the apple with a greater velocity than our "pitching" arm. Battle grounds were identified within designated properties and the apple attacks would ensue. My brother Kevin holds the record for hitting two heads with one apple from a "launcher." Kevin nailed Pumpkin Head Hulick with a freshly picked Granny Smith and the same apple ricocheted into the noggin of Bob "Head" Krestel. Jessie Dominick would referee and mentioned "Those two always  had heads 'like a lion'."


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "So That's How You Say It!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-so-that-s-how-you-say-it-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-so-that-s-how-you-say-it-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 12 May 2015 10:39:05 PM p Pat Shingleton:

We have all experienced some Springtime downpours, especially since the end of April and through Mid-May. Possibly these events have prompted a few reminders of weather related expressions. Intense thunderstorms to some trigger a suggestion that "the angels are bowling." We've had a taste of late spring and early summer heat and humidity thus the expression, "Hotter than a fox in a forest fire." The Fourth of July always brings back, "Hotter than a Firecracker!" Another popular thunder expression, "It sounds like God's tater wagon turned over!" Our episodes of heavy rain may initiate flood watches and warnings but you won't recognize the National Weather Service initiating this alert... "It's gonna be a stump-floater and a gully washer." Here's a flirtatious hail storm reference that my wife has often used: "She's batting her eyes like a frog in a hailstorm." You may have recognized this one when the sun is shining and it's raining at the same time; "Seems like the devil is getting married" or "Looks and sounds like the devil is beating his wife." Forward your expressions to me for future columns.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Landslides and Sea Monkeys" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-landslides-and-sea-monkeys-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-landslides-and-sea-monkeys-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 11 May 2015 6:25:03 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

There is no means of predicting landslides but researchers are finding reasons for these deadly shifts of earth. Water Resources Research discovered that landslide risks occur from not only the amount of rainfall but how the rain actually falls. Other ingredients include soil type, depth, vegetation and previous storm damage. All of these ingredients contribute to the redistribution of water. Scientists constructed a revised model that incorporated load distribution behavior and how it changes during different rain patterns such as heavy downpours, light steady rain or sporadic showers. These varying patterns created a difference in the number of simulated landslides, ranging from 30 to as many as 100. Loosened soil ranged from 105.944 cubic feet to 2,118,880. I noticed another article in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society reporting on sea monkeys. A study published in Physics and Fluids found that tiny marine organisms could be influencing global sea patterns. Scientists tracked the sea monkeys or brine shrimp by using microscopic glass spheres and lasers to monitor the circulation of the spheres as the shrimp migrated. The study found the shrimp moving vertically, in response to light and rising to the surface during darkness. During daytime hours they went into deeper water. Interestingly, their collective swimming generated water currents comparable to one trillion watts, making them about as influential on ocean circulation as wind or tides.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: What A Mom!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-what-a-mom-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-what-a-mom-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 8 May 2015 7:34:14 PM Pat Shingleton: What A Mom!

She lives in the house where she was born, where her parents died and attempts to relocate her to Fort Worth or Baton Rouge, where her children reside, would have taken her away from the community that she loves. She embraces the change of seasons and her oldest, Denis, was born in the Spring, Mike in the Summer, Patrick and Kevin in Winter, Maureen and Mark in the Fall. Whether a snowstorm or thunderstorm, she refers to them by saying, "It's getting bad out there..."   As a young girl, standing at the kitchen sink, she was struck by lightning. There was no hesitation when she saved the life of a drowning swimmer. She taught us the importance of prayer, work, study, physical exercise, eating and sleep. She commanded us to, "Do a good deed every day..."   Summertime chores were a discipline followed by sports-related activities or swimming. In the Fall, leaves were raked and piled on the garden. The snowy winters found us clad in snow-pants, boots, hoods, gloves, and home-made stocking hats; we could hardly move. I escorted Sue Welsh to our school prom as she requested violets for her corsage. Mom and her friend, Loraine Blinn, picked hundreds of them and took them to the local florist where Sue's corsage was constructed. She's 94 years young young and is affectionately called Shirley, Aunt Shirley or Grandma Shirley, but for me it's, "Mum... She has held in her arms, 14 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. This weekend she will receive cards, letters, and Presto messages from not only her kids but kids that she has helped raise, that also recognize her as their "Mum."


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Balloons-Still Useful" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-balloons-still-useful-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-balloons-still-useful-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 6 May 2015 6:46:20 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

As technology changes and advances weather forecasting and assisting in accuracy, old-time methods are also of value. Pilot or pibal balloons were one of the first methods of determining the condition of winds-aloft. These balloon observations were useful to early aviators and were extensively used during World War I. Balloons are still launched, twice a day, from the National weather Service Center in Slidell. As noted, today it's called the National Weather Service but back then it was called the Meteorological Service of the U.S. Signal Corps. In 1923 nearly 5000 pilot balloon observations were taken; kept in sight at a distance of 60 miles and sometimes to heights of 20 miles. Before balloons, the first reliable observations of upper air winds came from instrumented kites. Benjamin Franklin initiated the use of kites for weather experiments and by the 1890s observations of the atmosphere were common due to the development of steel piano wire. The wire supported the weight of the kite and the attached instrument packages measured temperature, atmospheric pressure and humidity.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "How High's the Water, Mama?" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-how-high-s-the-water-mama-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-how-high-s-the-water-mama-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 5 May 2015 7:11:27 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Each evening on my 6:00 PM weather casts, I posted water markers on the steps of the Big Muddy. Either from the USS Kidd or "on the banks," we time-lapsed the record rise as hundreds watched and enjoyed these occassions. Also on this date in 2011, hydrologists monitored the record rise of the Mississippi River. The National Weather Service Forecast Center's Mississippi River Flood History posted a timely item. In 1543 Hernando Desoto experienced a 40 day flood near what-is-now Memphis. In 1788 a hurricane caused severe flooding which also marked the arrival of Acadian settlers at Fort Bute, Manchac and Baton Rouge. Another spring-flooding episode occurred in 1825, known as the last inundation of New Orleans on the lower Mississippi River. During the greatest flood in history, Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover was elected President, enacting legislation to implement flood control projects. One year later, construction on the Bonnet Carre Spillway began with a full capacity flow that matched the daily flow of  Niagara Falls.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "An Oddity for Cinco de Mayo" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-oddity-for-cinco-de-mayo-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-oddity-for-cinco-de-mayo-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 4 May 2015 5:49:53 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On May 5, 1786, Haiti experienced a six-month drought. In the seventh month, strong easterly winds assisted in activating needed showers and thunderstorms. In addition to the falling rain a large quantity of black eggs showered-down on Port-Au-Prince. The following day the eggs hatched with tadpole-like creatures emerging from their shells. This process continued with repeated episodes of "skin-shedding."  More than 100 years later, English naturalist Phillip Henry Gosse visited the island and experienced a rhapsody of croaking from the marshes adjacent to the city. Islanders shared with Gosse the story of the raining eggs and the seasonal tradition that "May-Frogs" had arrived, falling from the sky. In 1887 in County Durham, northeast England, Edward Cook took shelter with his horse under the gables of a cottage while thumbnail-sized frogs rained down.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Rhubarb Season" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rhubarb-season-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rhubarb-season-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 1 May 2015 6:09:25 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Most of our cold weather wrapped-up after March 17th and didn't complicate or retard the local tomato crop as blossoms continue to advance to fruit. In Pennsylvania, my grandfather "turned-over" the garden with a shovel until he was convinced that Mr. Hollenbeck could "disc it up" with his tractor. Our garden was quite large then and merely a "patch" today. Before her lack of mobility, Mom would always prepare for her first crop of the season-rhubarb, followed by leaf lettuce, beans, tomatoes and sweet corn that should be "knee high by the 4th of July." Ground cover protected her rhubarb, always harvesting a bumper crop every year. Three years ago, her rhubarb crop became a "bumper" crop as she was the sole provider of rhubarb for the local Giant Eagle supermarket.The produce manager would make his seasonal call in April. Mom noted, he paid me "six-bucks-a-pound." We've heard that Sylvia Weatherspoon's rhubarb pie with strawberries was judged as the best in Baton Rouge. After three years, she still hasn't shared it with the News 2 Crew.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Lightning Karma..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lightning-karma-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lightning-karma-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 30 Apr 2015 9:44:49 PM Pat Shingletpon Pat Shingleton:

Recently I enjoyed dinner with one of my daughter Katie's entourage of friends. We were discussing the dangers of lightning.  Years ago, my Dad commented that he didn't understand why folks in South Louisiana headed indoors during a random late spring or summertime shower.  I explained to Dad that normal showers here can rapidly become severe thunderstorms including dangerous and deadly lightning strikes. I furthered that Florida is the state with the highest number of lightning hits and Louisiana is in the second position.  Let's return to dinner with Katie's friend, Becky Ewing, and lightning strikes that hit her hometown of New Roads and False River. I explained that open areas, such as lakes, rivers and waterways are attractants to lightning. Continuing our discussion and additional lightning stories, I shared with them that around 300 A.D. a father was so enraged when his daughter converted to Christianity, he beheaded her. Following the decapitation he was killed by lightning. His daughter was anointed Saint Barbara Dioscorus, the patron saint of lightning victims. British military officer, Major R. Summerford while on the battlefield in Flanders in February 1918, was knocked off his horse by a stroke of lightning, paralyzing him from the waist down. In 1924, while fishing with two friends, lightning hit him again, paralyzing his entire right side. In 1934 a third lightning strike hit him, leaving him permanently paralyzed. Two years later he died and was buried. Just after his internment, another bolt of lightning struck the cemetery destroying the tombstone of Major Summerford. Becky commented, "Was his nickname Lucky?" Katie laughed but I didn't think it was very funny...


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "The Season Continues..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-season-continues-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-season-continues-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 29 Apr 2015 5:47:06 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Storm investigator's from the National Weather Service completed their initial evaluation of Monday's storms.  They officially identified five locations where confirmed twisters occurred. Pierre Part's tornado clocked winds of 100 mph staying on-the-ground for a half mile. Napoleonville's had winds of 85 and again was on-the-ground for eight-tenths of a mile with Kenner's advancing to 90 miles per hour. The last three years of tornado outbreaks in Mississippi and Alabama have shifted twister intensity from Tornado Alley to the Dixie Alley. Another outbreak is noted from April 3rd and 4th, 1974. For sixteen hours, 148 tornadoes damaged 13 states east of the Mississippi River, including the province of Ontario, Canada. The combined path length was 2,598 miles as deaths totaled 315 with 5,484 injuries. Six tornadoes reached EF-5 intensity  Enhanced Fujita Scale) with six cities hit twice in the same day. On May 1,1933, the deadliest tornado in Louisiana history struck Minden with 28 deaths and 400 injuries. Professor Theodore Fujita developed the Fujita scale for determining tornado intensity and waited 30 years before seeing his first live tornado.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Salt of the Earth" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-salt-of-the-earth-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-salt-of-the-earth-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 28 Apr 2015 10:44:12 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Numerous salts and salt products are used in Louisiana for a multitude of uses. Salt farming depends on the weather and for French artisan farmers; it's a labor of love. The wind and the sun's heat creates a high tide in Guerande, France; an area of marshy meadows, also known as the "Cote Sauvage." Europeans harvested salt from this area since the ninth century and salt farmers or paludiers use the same technique and tools to collect this caviar of salt. The collection process begins with a wooden gate that traps the sea water into the marsh. When the correct amount of water flows at the correct rate, a maze of clay walls promotes slow evaporation. After a month, the water seeps into shallow pools and salt appears.In addition to tides, sunny warm days are the key ingredients in salt farming. Salt farmers, known as paludiers, collect the gourmet of all salts for use in renowned restaurants worldwide. Once a wooden gate traps the sea water, a collection of clay walls promotes slow evaporation. Seepage leads to shallow pools and the appearance of the salt. Salt farmers use a tool, resembling a swimming pool skimmer to drag what looks like a lattice of thin ice into a wicker basket. After skimming the top, the evaporation process continues, leaving the clay-bottomed basin loaded with coarse grey salt. Natural salt is less acidic and less sharp than industrial salts and the paludier's harvest of 60 tons of salt relies on wind, water and sun.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Lead Time..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lead-time-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lead-time-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 27 Apr 2015 9:55:16 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

For the 39 years that I have been preparing and presenting weather alerts and forecasts, the inherent message is to protect life and property. The technological advances in severe weather alerts have greatly increased for the benefit of providing needed "lead time" to protect life and property. South Louisiana and most coastal communities recognize and realize the benefits of preparedness before a land falling tropical storm or hurricane. Our early Monday morning storm system unloaded on Baton Rouge resulting in damage and power outages. Our Weather Team began the alert process Sunday evening with reminders that marginal, slight and enhanced expectations of severe weather were inevitable. Statistically, the actual episodes of "identifiable" and "verified" storm episodes are one-in-ten. My personal message is the "it only takes one" scenario. A single Katrina, Gustav or Rita negates the law-of-averages and an early morning severe weather episode, lasting 94 minutes, can result in dangerous and life threatening consequences. So, I'm utilizing this space as a reminder, weather its a NOAA weather radio, the weather apps provided by WBRZ, our constant weather coverage on Cox Cable Channel 18, and WBRZ Channel 2, those platforms and we are there for you, our viewers.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Rock Alum...." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rock-alum-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rock-alum-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 24 Apr 2015 10:33:35 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Baseball today at "The Box" is currently under an obvious rain delay! Pre-dawn sprinkles advanced to stronger showers and thunderstorms, wrapping up tonight.  I forwarded a column that detailed how many athletes use baby powder to remain cool during athletic competitions.With that noted, Alum contains aluminum sulfate and is found in styptic pencils and as astringents.  Alum is used as a skin soothing agent. My mother had a "medicine drawer" containing every medicinal substance invented from the 1900s to the present, especially Rollie salve, which will be discussed in a future column. Years ago Andy Ezell and I walked 36 holes at the Delmar and Stonecrest courses in Western Pennsylvania. A buildup of sweat and moisture, "in the lower torso," causes one to become "galded" - diagnosed as a "sore rash." Mom told us before we went to play to place a clump of alum in our pant pocket to prevent the rash. We didn't and we were sore.Due to the use of alum in the construction of illegal drugs, the substance is hard to acquire for purposeful mediations an applications. However,  to this day, Stan Harris, President of the Louisiana Restaurant Association and Bob Gelbach always carry rock alum.

 


Permalink| Comments


]]>