WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2017, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Wed, 18 Jan 2017 08:01:34 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: Mistake on the Lake http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-mistake-on-the-lake/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-mistake-on-the-lake/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 17 Jan 2017 11:19:11 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton: Mistake on the Lake

My first institution of higher learning was Gannon University in Erie, PA.  Last Fall I visited the old "stomping grounds" sharing with my wife the University buildings, fraternity house and the location of my first radio stint on State Street.  Years ago, students would refer to it as the "Mistake on the Lake."  During the winters of '93-'94, most of the Great Lake's surface was solid.  In '79, all of the Great Lakes were frozen.  On Memorial Day, '96, picnickers along Lake Superior's shoreline, cooled their drinks with chunks of ice floating in the lake.  Here, we use sand on bridges during episodes of freezing weather.  In the snow-belt locations, snow fences are placed near highways to prevent drifts onto the roadway. The fence reduces wind speed and increases turbulence, causing the snow to pile downwind of the fence.


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Pat Shingleton: "The B's in Bees Wax,,," http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-b-s-in-bees-wax-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-b-s-in-bees-wax-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 16 Jan 2017 9:58:14 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

In the 1880s, Dr. Charles Fleet invented Chapstick. The tubular ointment contains camphor, 
bees wax, menthol, petrolatum, phenol and aloe. Chapstick sales increase during the winter
months. One ingredient used in Chapstick was also useful for another ailment. Personal hygiene
was certainly limited in comparison to current regimes. Those that contracted acne and smallpox
scars found that severe scars developed in adulthood. Therefore the treatment for scars was
bee's wax. Pictures discovered today identify women with their faces layered with bee's wax
to fill and smooth their complexion. Another item includes episodes of "gossipy" conversation
or "staring," at a face-infused with the wax, thus the customary retort was "mind your own bee's
wax." A smiling face, loaded with wax dried wax initiated another expression, "crack a smile."
Finally, sitting too close to the fireplace began the a similar expression, "you are
losing face." There you have it!


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Pat Shingleton: "Into the Hudson and Frozen Fingers..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-into-the-hudson-and-frozen-fingers-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-into-the-hudson-and-frozen-fingers-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 13 Jan 2017 10:27:40 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On January 14, 2009 a storm system sent gusty winds to New York with light snow showers.  On the following day, calm, cold weather was reported.  Due to de-icing delays in Pittsburgh, US Airways Flight 1549 left LaGuardia Airport at 3:25 p.m. bound for Charlotte.  Less than 2 minutes after takeoff, at an altitude of 2,900 feet, a flock of Canadian geese struck the aircraft knocking-out both engines and sending the 150,000 pound Airbus A320 into a glide.  The plane was descending over the Bronx at 1,000 feet per minute and the plane’s Captain made a decision never before performed – ditching in the Hudson River. Captain Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger and First Officer Jeff Skiles safely off-loaded their passengers in 35 degrees and a wind chill value of 11. From the river to cold hands. Miriam Johnson was our piano teacher and her three worst students were me and my brothers Denis and Michael.  More interested in sports than classical music, it was a challenge for Mom to ensure that daily practices were completed. Saturday morning’s lesson included a mile walk to Miriam’s house on Spring Ave in all types of weather.  January winter’s were tricky, regardless of how “bundled” you were for the journey.  Inevitably our hands were fresh frozen when we reached the side door to her home.  Therapy for frozen hands included a regimen of running cold water onto your digits, followed by warm then hot.  I’m not sure if she charged my Mom extra for the water before we “tickled the ivories.”


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Pat Shingleton: "Deicing and THE Blizzard" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-deicing-and-the-blizzard-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-deicing-and-the-blizzard-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 12 Jan 2017 10:45:50 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Years ago, plane de-icing was randomly performed and now is a mandatory application during episodes of freezing weather. On January 13, 1982, Air Florida Flight 90 crashed into the icy Potomac River, 30 seconds after takeoff from National Airport in Arlington, Virginia.  The casualty count noted 78 deaths, including four who were in cars on the 14th Street Bridge.  The National Transportation Safety Board determined the cause of the crash was the failure of pilots to abort the takeoff and a lapse in time to activate anti-icing equipment.  Ice on wings is dangerous because of additional weight and the loss of lift for the aircraft, causing drag on the aircraft’s body.  A wing can lose 30% of lift with a small accumulation of ice. Finally, a blizzard is a storm with sustained winds of 35  m.p.h. for three hours with blowing snow that reduces visibilities to a quarter mile.  January 12th marks another anniversary that marks one of the worst winter storms to hit United States. In 1888, from the Great Plains to Texas, temperatures dropped, winds howled and snow fell as 235 perished in snowdrifts.  Some of the casualties were not discovered until the spring thaw.  Later that same year on March 12, the Great White Hurricane slammed the East Coast that lasted three days. Fifty inches of snow fell in Massachusetts with 50 foot snow drifts from Maryland to Canada.  The storm sank 200 ships and killed 400, including 100 seamen.  It is considered the worst blizzard in United States history.


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Pat Shingleton: "Here Shiner, Here Shiner, Ya-Ya!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-here-shiner-here-shiner-ya-ya-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-here-shiner-here-shiner-ya-ya-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 11 Jan 2017 10:44:36 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

With temperatures edging within a few degrees of the 80 degree mark, we're quickly forgetting our freezing temperatures last weekend. There will be many more episodes of cold weather from now until mid-April that could activate alerts to protect vegetation, pets and pipes in addition to transportation authorities preparing for episodes of icing and glazing. I received a "scathing" reminder last Friday about the greater importance of pets than pipes in our coverage. During our younger years, it was rare to have an "indoor" dog and when an expected blast of Canadian air arrived, it meant that our "outside dog,"  Pooch, was permitted to spend the cold evenings in our basement. We called him Pooch, Mom called him Poochie and our grandfather referred to his as "Shiner." Gramps would often provide  table scraps for him, standing at the backdoor yelling, "Here Shiner, here Shiner, Ya, Ya." Getting him to the basement was often challenging. Once let loose, from his outdoor confines, he acted like an escaped  prisoner. Once again, Gramps would corral him with  the "Here Shine" routine. Meanwhile, back in the basement, Pooch enjoyed sleeping next to Uncle Emery upon his late night return from the Elks Club.

 


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Pat Shingleton: "Exploding Molasses and Dropping the Grate" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-exploding-molasses-and-dropping-the-grate-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-exploding-molasses-and-dropping-the-grate-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 10 Jan 2017 10:36:42 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Today marks the anniversary of “America’s most fascinating and surreal disaster.”  On January 11, 1919, Boston’s Daily Globe reported that “a cold air mass settled in.” The following morning, the mercury tumbled from 36 degrees to 20 at 2:00 p.m to 7 degrees at 10:00 p.m.; then 2 degrees.  Crews from the ship Miliero pumped a half million gallons of molasses from its warm hold into tanks holding existing cold molasses causing a bubbling churn; vibrating the tank’s walls.  Workers reported the walls were groaning. This process activated fermentation, aided by a temperature rise to 50. Then the top of the 58 foot tank blew and a 50 foot wave of 2 million gallons rushed over the streets killing 21, injuring 150. Before gas furnaces, many relied on the coal furnace.  Situated in the basement of the home the burning coal heated an iron “bell” that radiated heat into the rest of the home through a series of insulated ducts. The radiated heat ultimately made it  into registers that warmed the rooms and the house.  Before bedtime it was the duty of my father, grandfather and later us, to stoke the fire and layer coal to provide some overnight warmth.  Eventually, the grate that held the coal ashes sifted into a chamber that was removed on a daily basis.  Traditionally, my grandfather would “drop the grate” on Saturday afternoons to remove remaining ashes and to provide more heat than needed -  while he took his bath. 


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Pat Shingleton: "A Snow Event..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-snow-event-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-snow-event-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 9 Jan 2017 10:27:51 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Before the BCS Championship series was inaugurated in 1998, bowl games retained their original names. In 2002, it was the Nokia Sugar Bowl. On January 1, 2002, the LSU Tigers competed against the Fighting Illini of Illinois. Tiger fans trekked to the Super Dome on a cloudy, cold day. The forecast initially called for rain, changing to sleet, ice pellets and a flurry. LSU won 47 to 34 and the ride home also provided additional excitement. At the end of the game, snow was falling in Baton Rouge and when we pulled into the driveway our son, Michael was frolicking in a few inches of snow. We attempted to awake our daughter Katie who slept through the falling snow but still enjoyed lingering patches and icy conditions the next morning.


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Pat Shingleton: "Skitching and the Birthday Girl..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-skitching-and-the-birthday-girl-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-skitching-and-the-birthday-girl-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 6 Jan 2017 10:48:43 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

In South Louisiana, car-hopping, many years ago, occurred at Hopper's and are still in existence at a few Sonic locations. Car hopping in Western Pennsylvania occurred after a heavy snow. Our favorite jump-on spot was Pete Pavlovic's Store. With a half-foot of snow on Brighton Road, cars would spin across the icy road, trying to make it up the grade. Hiding behind the store we'd wait for the right moment to "hop the cars" by grasping the rear bumper at the right moment and enjoy the glide down the road as our boots created a snow wake. At school, the next day, we often found a car-hopper with a lump on his head. A few dry spots on the road meant our boots stopped sliding and our heads met the trunk. My friend, Pat Quigley performed a similar experience where it was called, "skitching." Finally a special day today and years ago. The daytime high for New Year's Day, 1988, was 59 with chilly wind blown rain. On January 3, we hit 81 degrees, breaking a record high for the date logged in 1943.  Another front zipped through on January 4 sending the temperatures down 28 degrees from the previous day to a high of 52 and a freeze warning. By January 6 a major snowstorm was brewing in the Midwest while Baton Rouge experienced rain and 44 degrees. On January 7, 1988 two events occurred. A freeze and winter storm warning was posted for the area and Katie Shingleton was born. She was transported home with snow on the ground. Happy birthday Katie, and great forecasts for you in the future.


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Pat Shingleton: "Mittens or Gloves" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-mittens-or-gloves-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-mittens-or-gloves-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 5 Jan 2017 10:46:19 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Gloves were in use from December 9th through the 18th and will certainly be needed this weekend.
Mittens are more effective  for hand warming. Exposed body parts such as ears, nose, toes and
fingers are vulnerable when the mercury dips to dangerous levels, sometimes causing frostbite.
Duck hunting this weekend will be tricky and  fishing enthusiasts and golfers sometimes experience
"chilbains," caused by prolonged exposure to cold,  damp weather. The chilbain symptoms include:
redness, burning, itching and  chafing of hands and feet. Years ago, the U.S. Army designed a
climate-controlled high-tech "uniform." These waterproof suits included tubes, similar to NASA's
space suits and effectively circulated  cold and warm air to accommodate body temperature.
"Objective Force Warrior" was a computerized  suit, originally designed in the 90s, with a
tele-screen helmet and purifying system. Finally, In October, 1948, smog filled the
Monongahela Valley in western Pennsylvania. Damaging oxides of nitrogen, halogen acids, zinc
and lead claimed 20 lives with 2,000 afflicted with respiratory disorders.  Fog and industrial pollution
created the worst episode of smog in London from January 5th through the 9th in 1952.  Stagnant air
over the four day period found sulfur dioxide and particulate concentrations reaching deadly levels.
The smog was so thick that Londoners couldn't see their hands with outstretched arms,traffic stopped
and only the blind could navigate. Close to 100,000 residents became sick as deaths from bronchitis
and influenza increased ten times leaving 4,000 dead. Four years later, Parliament enacted the British
Clean Air Bill as the burning of bituminous coal was banned.


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Pat Shingleton: "Snow Sheds..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-snow-sheds-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-snow-sheds-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 4 Jan 2017 10:29:25 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The ski season in the west is receiving good reviews. In the construction of the transcontinental railroad, snow from the Sierras to Sacramento created avalanches that wiped out stretches of rail. In 1887 engineers used beams from local timber to construct a sturdy device that furthered construction and kept the trains rolling. The structure is called a snow sheds and initially were placed over exposed track to funnel the sliding snow over the top of the tracks. Today, snow sheds remain a common method for combating the destructive force of avalanches on railroad and highway routes throughout the world. From timber years ago to shed that are constructed with reinforced concrete and steel.  On steep slopes, snow fences assist in anchoring the snow packs.


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Pat Shingleton: "Weather and Native Americans..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-weather-and-native-americans-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-weather-and-native-americans-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 3 Jan 2017 5:56:34 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Firewood sales may  be on the increase this weekend with a blast of frigid temperatures.  I scanned the archives to forward this message from our old friend Joe Macaluso...On a reservation in South Dakota, Native Americans asked their chief if the winter was going to be cold?  Unaware of ancient forecasting secrets he visited the National Weather Service. The meteorologist verified it was going to be cold and the chief ordered his tribe to collect wood. A week later he called the local N.W.S. office asking again if the winter would be cold?  Another meteorologist responded that it would. He ordered the collection of more wood and two weeks later questioned the N.W.S. folks to be sure it would be a cold winter. “Absolutely,” the meteorologist replied, “the coldest ever!” The chief asked, “How can you be sure?”  The weatherman replied (here it comes)…”The Native Americans are collecting a lot of firewood.” Adding to that one, my favorite brother-in-law, Frank Kean forwarded an interesting historical trivia expression that is also timely, concerning the levels of the Mississippi River.  In Frank’s e-mail, the “saying” was discovered by Benny Lopoo.  You may have heard the expression, “God willing the creeks don’t rise;” referring to an episode of flooding. Benjamin Hawkins was a politician and diplomat who handled “Indian Affairs.” His encounters with a particular tribe of Native Americans, is the basis for this expression.  When the President of the United States abruptly ordered Hawkins to Washington, during an Indian rebellion, Hawkins relayed the saying to his wife and expecting safe passage through hostile territory he capitalized the word “Creek.” Hawkins was referring to the Creek Indian tribe not a possible episode of rising water and flooding.


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Pat Shingleton: "The First Ball Drop and New Years Food-Stuff" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-first-ball-drop-and-new-years-food-stuff-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-first-ball-drop-and-new-years-food-stuff-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 30 Dec 2016 6:46:54 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On this date in 1907, The New York Times moved its offices to a building on a square that now bears its name.  To commemorate the paper’s new home, publisher Alfred Ochs provided a lavish New Year’s Eve celebration intended to attract parishioners from Trinity Church in lower Manhattan.  The church was traditionally the gathering place on New Year’s Eve, however 200,000 people celebrated New Year’s Eve for the first time, 109 years ago, in the newly-named Times Square. That same year, Ochs added more excitement to the celebration when a 700-pound, 5-foot-diameter ball, made of iron and wood and covered it with electrical lights. Weather for the first event was 52 degrees with light rain. In 1917 it was -13 degrees with snow and tonight, revelers will enjoy clear skies and "ball-drop" temperature of 42 degrees. For New Year's Day you may participate in "food-stuff" traditions to ensure health and prosperity in 2017. This may include the consumption of pork, knackwurst, bratwurst, kielbasa, sauerkraut, applesauce or black eyed peas. To avoid getting hit by lightning this year burn the Yule log. Traditional beliefs found that lightning would never hit a house with a smoldering block of oak.  Roman generals wore laurel wreaths and sealskin coats during episodes of thunder. French peasants would carry "pierres de tonnerre" or thunderstones in their pockets to ward off lightning. And finally you may want to ring a bell. Church bells in medieval Europe have the inscription: "Fulgura Frango" meaning "I break up lightning strokes." Happy New Year from YOUR Weather Team.


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Pat Shingleton: "The 200th Wife..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-200th-wife-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-200th-wife-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 29 Dec 2016 10:40:45 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

During his 67-year reign in the 12th century B.C.E., Ramses negotiated one of history’s first peace and mutual aid treaties with King Nebuchadnezzar and the Hittite kingdom. Part of the deal was Ramses marriage to Neb’s eldest daughter, Matnefrure. Mat couldn’t travel to Egypt alone and an escort was needed. The weather between the Hittite kingdom, in the Near East, and Egypt was often stormy during the winter season. To protect the escort from inclement weather, Ramses called upon Seth, the Egyptian god of wind and storms, to hold back the winter rains. The escort was safely able to deliver the Hittite princess to the pharaoh and upon delivery, the beautiful princess become numero uno of Ramses’ 200 wives.


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Pat Shingleton: http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--91544/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--91544/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 28 Dec 2016 10:27:51 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Alaska holds the distinction of being the largest state in area; almost twice the size of Texas.  It is also home to America’s tallest peak, Mount McKinley at 20,320 feet and its glaciers constitute 29,000 square miles.  In Barrow, the Sun is below the horizon from November 20 through January 22. According to NOAA, six of the top 25 windiest cities in the United States are in Alaska and St. Paul Island ranks as the second-windiest location behind Mt. Washington, N.H. Weather extremes in Alaska include the lowest temperature at -80 degrees at Prospect Creek Camp and the highest at 100 degrees at Fort Yukon. As noted in a previous column, the highest one day snowfall occurred in Thompson Pass with 62 inches on December 29, 1955. wrapping up this morning's column with this note...Senator Roscoe Conkling left his Wall Street office in route to the New York Club during the Great Blizzard of 1888.  “Freaks of the Storm” reports that when he reached Union Square he became stranded in a snowdrift and struggled to free himself from the surrounding snow. After arriving at the club, he had a drink and collapsed, dying the next day.  C. H. McDonald stumbled through the same blinding snowstorm when he collided with a hard object that left a gash on his head.  He picked through the pile of snow and determined that the cause of the accident was the hoof of a dead horse. Thereafter he was recognized as the only man ever to be kicked in the head by a dead horse.


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Pat Shingleton: "Lava Detonation and the Father of Forecasting" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lava-detonation-and-the-father-of-forecasting-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lava-detonation-and-the-father-of-forecasting-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 27 Dec 2016 10:39:55 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On December 22, 1935, Dr. Thomas Jaggar, Director of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, knew that a lava flow was threatening the coastal city of Hilo.  The type of lava was called pahoehoe and develops a skin-like surface as its outer layer cools in the open air. This process builds a roof and walls that insulate the flow. Tthe lava pooled in the saddle between Mauna Loa and Mauna Key, Jaggar believed the only way to break the pool was by bombing it. On December 27, 1935, the U.S. Air Corps Bombing Squadron from Honolulu dropped twenty, 600-pound bombs at two points on the lava channel, spreading the lava and stopping the flow. Hilo was saved and Jaggar repeated the procedure in 1942. Finally,  Joe Henry is credited as the first forecaster. "The Father of Forecasts" was the first director of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington and organized the gathering of weather data through a network of 150 volunteers.  His weather spotters would gather readings then submit them to telegraph offices where operators transmitted their findings daily to Washington in the 1850s.  At the Smithsonian, Henry also presented the first weather map to the public, showing conditions submitted by his observers.  He championed the effort that "Science should be given away freely."  In addition to his initiation of weather forecasts, he invented the first practical electric motor and telegraph and dabbled in electricity, assisting in inventing the door bell and air conditioning.


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Pat Shingleton: "Christmas Sledding, Blizzard Hall of Fame" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-christmas-sledding-blizzard-hall-of-fame-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-christmas-sledding-blizzard-hall-of-fame-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 26 Dec 2016 10:31:31 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Acts of God, The Old Farmer’s Almanac compiled a list of events that were placed into The Blizzard Hall of Fame. On December 26, 1778, nine German mercenaries froze at their posts in Newport, Rhode Island that later became known as the Hessian Storm.  As it struck southern New England, fifty people died in subzero temperatures that included an 18-inch snowfall. Offshore gales, associated with the storm, beached 28 vessels on Staten Island. The Blizzard Hall of Fame also recognized an event on December 26, 1947, when one of New York’s deepest snowfalls put 27 inches of new snow on the ground in Central Park in 24 hours. Twenty seven people died from the storm and snow removal costs rocketed to $8 million. Finally, The day after Christmas was a time to visit your buddies to see what "they got."  Weather permitting, we also tested out the Flexible Flyers. It was rare if we didn't get a good dumping of snow around Christmas. The Sudano brothers were smoking cigarettes at the age of 8 and were also in charge of the bonfire, at the bottom of the sledding trail. The night before, "the hill" was watered down and as the temps dropped - ice formed. By morning, cars couldn't get up the icy mound but the sleds sure went down. The trail cut across Longview Drive, just to the left of Aunt Mae's house and ended in the woods with a series of homemade "jumps", as we went airborne. It ended not far from Nick and Tom's fire. In the fire was lunch that consisted of baked potatoes and apples, wrapped in aluminum foil.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Trip to Steckman's" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-trip-to-steckman-s-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-trip-to-steckman-s-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 16 Dec 2016 10:31:24 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Jack Steckman’s business provided gravesite services for our community in Pennsylvania.  During the Christmas Season he took orders for evergreen wreaths that were placed on the graves of loved ones.  Jack would save the left-over, fresh evergreen branches, for our Mum who would construct door decorations. The cold weather kept her displays fresh, long after Epiphany. I remember our grandfather putting me and my brother Kevin into a large cradle-box, attached to a sled, to retrieve the greenery from Steckman’s. Gramps pulled us down a snow-covered Brighton Road and a tenth-of-a-mile trip, would last hours.  Getting the “two-boys” out of the house gave mom a break and gave Gramps an opportunity to talk to everyone along the way.  At Steckman’s, the evergreen branches were layered into the cradle.  When the loading was complete, Gramps would continue his visitations, placing the sled under a snow-laden pine, next to Jack’s driveway.  Kevin crawled on-top of the branches whereby an “un-loading” took place. I shook a pine branch, dumping about 15 pounds of snow on him.  Gramps was very tired on the return trip as Kevin and I enjoyed a "Nap on the Evergreens."


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Pat Shingleton: http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--91169/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--91169/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 15 Dec 2016 9:50:40 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

A strong front moving through early Sunday morning could activate a severe storm. The front will outrun the cold air so no frozen precipitation is expected. Snowflakes take on a variety of sizes but these crystals have one thing in common; the same number of sides or facets. Should we receive some snow this winter, take a closer look. Johannes Kepler was one of the most noted scientists ever and wrote a book describing the six cornered snowflake, called "sexangula." The French philosopher, Rene Descartes, questioned the six sides and when Robert Hooke invented the microscope in the 1660's, the first thing he examined was the snowflake and its six sides.  The reason for the six sides involves the atomic structure of a water crystal which also has six sides.  A snowflake dances in the air and forms when each of the six corners grabs more moisture. From snowflakes to presents. Here are some Christmas gifts. Number 1 includes a small tree branch, painted green with a piece of wire twisted to the branch, wrapped with a bullet to the other end. Number 2 includes a box of salt with a pocket knife taped to it. The third gift includes task a 3-foot long piece of steel rod with a door key welded to the tip and a handle attached to the other end.  Gift Number 1 comes from my favorite brother-in-law, Frank Kean and is a “Cartridge in a Bare Tree.” Gift number 2 comes from my former director Stan Smith called a “Salt with a Deadly Weapon.”  Lee Roy Lagrange’s contraption is used to “Unlock an Elephant’s Trunk.” 


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Pat Shingleton: "Icy Steps and The Thump..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-icy-steps-and-the-thump-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-icy-steps-and-the-thump-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 14 Dec 2016 10:40:04 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Northern Pennsylvania and Western New York are experiencing blizzard conditions today. Here's a little story concerning our brother Mike  that noted the effects of weather and the disciplinary actions of our Dad.  After Mass at St. Agatha’s Church in Ellwood City, PA, Dad would routinely purchase either the Youngstown Vindicator or the Pittsburgh Press at curbside.  This particular Sunday was snowy as sheets of ice coated the sidewalks and church steps.  Standing outside the church, visiting with friends, a robust lady proceeded down the steps, lost her balance, slipped on the ice and went airborne. Spinning and swirling across the icy sidewalk in the midst of ohhhhs and ahhhs she landed at Mike's feet with me standing next to him.  For every action there’s an equal and opposite reaction…Our Dad was a butcher and had huge hands. Whenever a disciplinary action was initiated a curled middle finger protruding from the fist created the“thump;” directed at the back of the head. So, as the lady slid to our feet, I imitated an umpire and yelled, “Safe!” Thinking Mike made fun of the sliding lady, Dad gave him the “thump” while I got the laugh.


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Pat Shingleton: "What To Wear..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-what-to-wear-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-what-to-wear-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 13 Dec 2016 10:30:29 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

During these shifting weather patterns we’re constantly adjusting our wardrobes. After a freeze last weekend, we're preparing for another chill-down Friday morning. Not the case with our grandfather who resided with us.  Bert Price wore the same clothing day-in and day-out.  His “wardrobe” consisted of cotton long johns, heavy socks, flannel shirt, a railroad hat, work gloves, bib overalls or "heavy" pants,  that included buttoned suspenders. His high top shoes were occasionally covered with galoshes. He kept the sleeves on his long-sleeve shirt in place with elastic garters.  This was his uniform when he was a switchman on the railroad and his uniform during his remaining years. During the winter months he would don a coat called a “mackinaw.” Except for his “Sunday-Go-To-Meetin” clothes, this was his outfit for all seasons. Surprisingly, I never saw him sweat profusely or shiver.


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