WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2016, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Thu, 30 Jun 2016 10:06:34 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Ben Saves a Turkey..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ben-saves-a-turkey-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ben-saves-a-turkey-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 23 Jun 2016 5:50:18 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Louisiana ranks second to the number of lightning hits on a yearly basis, Florida is number one. Yesterday's column reviewed the ability of the Turkey Vulture to stay cool in a strange way. The Old Farmer’s Almanac-Acts of God notes an excerpt from one of Benjamin Franklin’s journals which may have placed the famed statesman and inventor as one of the first to execute resuscitation. The Journal notes,  “A pullet (turkey) was struck dead by the lightning shock directed through its head.”  Franklin furthered in his journal that he attempted to revive the turkey by repeatedly “blowing into its lungs.”  His attempts with this procedure met with success and apparently the bird recovered.  However, once it was “set down”, the confused and delirious turkey ran headlong against a wall. Historians believe this was one of the first cases of artificial respiration being used as a treatment of electric shock.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Gobble, Gobble then What?" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gobble-gobble-then-what-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gobble-gobble-then-what-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 22 Jun 2016 6:44:44 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Turkey vultures are beneficial to Louisiana as they not only clean the roadways of decomposing animals, also known as “road-kill,” but feast on trash discarded by motorists. Its head-shape gives it easier access inside a carcass. You may have noticed a few scavenging vultures along our Interstates and highways. Their appearance and eating habits could be a stomach turner and another characteristic of the bird may be borderline gross.  To stay cool, turkey vultures initiate a process known as urohydrosis, which is a polite way of noting that it urinates on its legs to prevent overheating.  This serves two purposes for the vulture.  The evaporating urine cools blood circulating through its legs and activates a disinfectant that eliminates germs that the scavenger may have absorbed from an earlier breakfast, lunch or dinner. Gross!


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "A Kool Down and an Explosion..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-kool-down-and-an-explosion-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-kool-down-and-an-explosion-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 21 Jun 2016 6:49:36 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

We're into the second day of summer with 91 remaining. When we were kids, lemons were expensive, so my mom stockpiled a fruity beverage that was invented by Edwin Perkins in 1927 called Kool-Aid, and a concentrate called Reamer's Lemon Blend. After a ball-game we'd bee-line it to the frig, quaffing down these refreshing drinks. However, my mom also saved the water from boiled potatoes to better activate the yeast for her home-made bread. Next to a pitcher of Kool-Aid was a same-colored quart of potato water. Even today, potato water is refreshing. More than 323 million packets of  Kool-Aid are sold each year and gallon-for-gallon, it's the number one most consumed beverage for kids. From Kool-Aid to another beverage. The sun is 868,000 miles across and is about 100 times the diameter of our planet. I realized the sun's power as a kid when we made our own root beer. We would retrieve a mixing crock from the basement and Mom would mix a root beer extract with sugar and yeast. After cleaning pop bottles, we'd funnel-in the root beer and manually cap the bottles with caps purchased from the local hardware store. A "bottle-capper" assisted in the process. This device have an adjustable height selector for either beer or soda bottles and a lever to press each bottle with a cap. The next process included placing the filled bottles in the sunlight. We would also spin them occasionally to eliminate the sediment.  It took four days to get the effervescence just-right.  Before the fourth day, some of the bottles would explode. The power of sunlight and the power of the yeast gave us an extra pop in our soda-pop


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Archived Storms..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-archived-storms-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-archived-storms-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 20 Jun 2016 5:57:48 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

We've designated the fourth storm of Hurricane Season-2016. Danielle should be a big rain maker in the coast of Mexico. As noted previously,  the nation's deadliest hurricane disaster happened in 1900 when as storm surge caused 8,000 deaths with estimates as high as 12,000. Prior to "storm-naming" it was referred to as the  "Atlantic-Gulf Hurricane of 1919," hitting Corpus  Christi on September 14. On September 13, 1928, 1,836 died from a lake surge following the Okeechobee hurricane.  The "Florida Keys-Labor Day Hurricane of 1935" moved through the Florida Keys and the Southeast killing 408. The "Long Island Express of 1938" battered southern New England and in 1944 the "Great Atlantic Hurricane" sank a Navy destroyer, minesweeper, two Coast Guard cutters and a light vessel.  Hurricane Carol caused $461 million in damage on August 31, 1954.  A few days later Hurricane Edna blasted Cape Cod killing 20. Rewinding to 1954 when Hurricane Hazel hit the Carolinas.  On October 15, Hazel moved north through Pennsylvania, New York and Canada.  One year later, Hurricanes Connie and Diane were only five days apart, nailing North Carolina then flooding Massachusetts.  Well-known to our area and the Texas coast was Hurricane Audrey in June 1957.  Storm surges advanced inland for 25 miles, killing 390.  In September 1965, Betsy hit Lafourche Parish, then moved inland, killing 75 in Louisiana.  Another hurricane making headlines for Baton Rouge was Camille in August 1969.  Winds, storm surge and rain killed 143 on the coast.  Rounding out the list is Alicia in 1983 that battered Galveston, Hugo in 1989 that swamped Charleston, S.C. and Andrew, the most destructive on record, before Gustav impacted Baton Rouge in 1992. Floyd hammered Cape Fear in September, 1999.  


Permalink| Comments


]]>
"My Dad, Your Dad, We "Dads." http://www.wbrz.com/news/my-dad-your-dad-we-dads-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/my-dad-your-dad-we-dads-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 17 Jun 2016 6:58:35 PM Pat Shingleton

In the old days, the butcher was considered a "break-down artist," proudly able to take a side of beef, cut it, chop and grind it. Through knowledge, practice and experience became a conduit for the housewife in assisting in the proper nutrition for a family. His body had to adjust to extremes of heat and cold that included stepping from the store to the freezer to the meat room and then outside. Another adjustment was the temperature and conditions outside, whatever the season may be.  He worked from a butcher-block table with sawdust on the floor.  At day's end, his boots were covered with clumps of sawdust, mixed with scraps that would fall from the butcher-block. In our home, Mom would give him the grocery list as I remember him "coming down through the back yard," carrying bags of groceries while maintaining his balance.  I thought he was also the father to every dog in the neighborhood.  They lapped at his shoes, sawdust and all.  Like so many dads today, he championed the responsibility FOR his children. To all the Dad's, enjoy the weekend with special intentions to those special father's that may have unfortunately lost their son or daughter.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "No Summer and the A.C." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-no-summer-and-the-a-c-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-no-summer-and-the-a-c-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 16 Jun 2016 6:35:26 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Thursday’s article noted the famous “Year Without a Summer” that occurred in 1816, the result of the eruption of Mount Tambora.  The volcano discharged dust and sulfurous gases that spread around the globe.  The diary of Hiram Harwood of Bennington, Vermont, noted that on June 11, 1817, frigid temperatures found New Englanders building “roaring fires in their hearth, as killing frosts turned leaves and gardens black.”  Once the cold spell ended, the farmers replanted their crops only to have temperatures plummeting again in July.  On August 21, hard frosts killed crops in Boston and a snowstorm whitened the peaks of the Green Mountains. The eruption inflicted climatic changes all over the Northern Hemisphere and is one of the first examples of global cooling. If you're visiting from other parts of the country, sometimes it's hotter and steamier than this. Years ago, the hum of the air-conditioner was found in locations such as stores, offices and bars. Now, air conditioning provides comfort in the car, bus, train, jet, with numerous units for the house and office. How did they keep cool, in south Louisiana 50 years ago? By moving air and ventilation, courtesy of the electric fan. In many older homes in our area, a 4-by-4 fan - in the attic - created comfort, and it did it solely on the principle of circulation. With the screened windows open, a persistent draft of air would flow from room to room. The ceiling fan also enhanced the movement of air. By recirculating the rising heat, this simple, time-tested device provided a downdraft of comfortable air to individual rooms.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "The Summer that Wasn't" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-summer-that-wasn-t-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-summer-that-wasn-t-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 15 Jun 2016 7:15:52 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

This Monday, June 20th will be the longest day of the year and also the first day of Summer...It begins at 5:34 PM and lasts for 93 days. So keep hydrated, take needed breaks if you're in the heat, check on the elderly and if you experience respiratory and cardiac complications, we'll monitor the air quality for elevated readings. In referencing Summer, there wasn't one in 1816. Snow and frost were common in June, July and August in the eastern United States. Savannah, GA, recorded a daytime high of 46 on the 4th of July. Researchers believe that a volcanic eruption spewed so much dust into the atmosphere, causing the cool down. Here's a few more items. On April 3, 1984, 148 tornadoes hit 13 Midwestern states causing 315 fatalities and was later referred to as the "Super Tornado Outbreak." It takes a million cloud droplets to form a raindrop and there are as many raindrops in a thunderstorm as there are teaspoons of water in the ocean. The Earth is struck by lightning 30 to 100 times per second with the odds of being hit, 1 in 28,500.  The energy released by one hurricane is the same as a megaton bomb exploding every minute.  One of the few planes allowed  to fly after September 11th, 2001 was an Air Force recon-plane out of Biloxi, MS., checking Tropical Storm Gabrielle. For the next 90 plus days, I will be asked when is it going to get cool? Our first freeze will be November 5th and we're out of the heat on September 24th.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "The Ah-Choo Monkey" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-ah-choo-monkey-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-ah-choo-monkey-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 14 Jun 2016 5:57:31 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

A species of monkey, discovered and identified nine years ago resides in Northern Myanmar- formerly Burma. This particular species would experience weather difficulties in Baton Rouge. Upon its discovery, the Yunnan snub-nosed surprised experts in its complexion but was familiar to residents of Myanmar. They reported that the monkeys are easy to find, especially during episodes of rain and constant showers.  Wiley-Blackwell reported that because of their wide upturned noses, rainwater gets into their nostrils and causes them to continually sneeze.  During episodes of extended rainy days the monkeys will place their heads between their knees so that rainwater will roll off their head and not in their nose.  During the summer months and extended periods of wet weather, the snub-nosed creatures migrate to higher elevations where snowfall doesn’t cause the “ah-choo” moments. They then return closer to the villages because snowfall shuts off their food sources.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Old Glory's Day!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-old-glory-s-day-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-old-glory-s-day-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 13 Jun 2016 6:44:06 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Hopefully you're "flyin' the flag" today. Our own "Giant American flag" is at Robinson Brother's at Airline and Sherwood. Before Chip Robinson, his Dad, Mackey, began this tradition to Old Glory. Whether it's a gentle breeze, or a hefty gust, the Robertson Brother's flag is a tremendous tribute. Today is Flag Day, originating in 1885 when B.J. Cigrand, encouraged his students in Fredonia, N.Y., to proudly display the flag of the United States of America. Today also commemorates the official anniversary of the adoption of the Stars and Stripes at the Betsy Ross House in Philadelphia, PA, on June 14, 1891. I vividly remember coming home on September 11, 2001 during the attack on our country. I thought Betsy Ross was coming from our house, on that day, as my wife carried nad hoisted the flag of the United States of America.  Our flag has flown ever since that horrific day from sunrise to sunset, illuminated at night. Old Glory should not be flown in rain or inclement weather and is expected to be raised briskly at sunrise and lowered slowly at sunset.

 


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "A Mop-Up Operation..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-mop-up-operation-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-mop-up-operation-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 8 Jun 2016 5:50:05 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Our kids refer to me as the "Clean-Freak Paw." My philosophy is if it's dirty...clean it. I would traditionally use the typical wringer mop until my wife discovered the "Spin-Mop" with a "Micro-Fiber Mop." The combination of both is faster, easier and more efficient. Last weekend's flooding showers and thundershowers necessitated "Mop-Up" operations for some. Part of our preparations for hurricane season and hurricane essentials, are mops. Eliminating water from businesses and residences following storms seems to be the first chore. A couple of years ago, Dan Theobald, an expert in water purification and conservation, presented a report noting that mop waste water includes necessary cleaners and particulate matter and contains limited contaminants. However, industrial plant floor water includes a toxic blend of chemicals, especially in maintenance areas of factories, hospitals and steel mills. Theobald believes that the chemical makeup and volume of mop waste water, compared to general waste water, requires handling, storage, analysis and treatment before discharging into the environment. The old directive of cleaning out the mop after its use could save the mop and help the environment. The "Spin-Mop" does it with each application. You can get my column "home delivered" at www.patshingleton.com


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Shots from the Air, Shots on the Course" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-shots-from-the-air-shots-on-the-course-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-shots-from-the-air-shots-on-the-course-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 7 Jun 2016 5:32:37 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Concluding our series of columns related to D-Day and the invasion of Europe during World War II this report offers shots from the air and on a golf course.  Nazi aircraft were constantly attacking northern England and their flight path sent them over an area where numerous golf courses were located. The Luftwaffe would load the barrels of their guns with wax which was a proven method of preventing the barrels from being clogged with ice.  As they crossed the coast they would purposely “clear their guns” by firing a rounds at golf courses. The constant strafing prompted precautionary actions from those on-the-ground attempting a few "shots" of their own. The Richmond Golf Club alerted their players with revised rules that included the following: “Players should collect Shrapnel splinters that damage the Mowing machines. During Gunfire or while Bombs are falling, players may take cover without penalty for ceasing play. The position of delayed action bombs are marked by red flags. A ball moved by enemy action may be replaced. A ball in a crater may be lifted. If a bomb explosion affects a player and another ball is played-1 stroke penalty. One club length for bomb splinters and Shrapnel.”


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Dr. J.M. Stagg's Predictions" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dr-j-m-stagg-s-predictions-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-dr-j-m-stagg-s-predictions-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 6 Jun 2016 10:27:23 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The invasion of Europe on June 6, 1944 was the greatest military operation in history. If the weather was unfavorable for Operation Overlord, it would have postponed the invasion for two weeks until tides were suitable for landing.  Weatherwise Magazine reported that in 1944, there were no meteorological observations or the use of computer models. Years ago, predicting the weather over the English Channel was challenging.  Weathermen depended on secretive ship and plane reports and from spies on the European mainland.  These observations were coded, forwarded to England and tediously plotted to maps by hand. Numerous groups extrapolated the data including: a civilian group in Dunstable, England, The British Meteorological Service, U.S forecasters called “Widewing” and the British Navy. On May 31, 1944, a series of low pressure systems set-up from Nova Scotia to Scotland that had characteristics of a possible hurricane. An Azores high could deflect the storms however too much cloud cover and the advance bombers would be useless; too much wind and the landing craft couldn’t function.  Dr. J.M. Stagg coordinated all forecasts to produce a consensus forecast that met the approval of General Eisenhower who attended the daily weather briefings.  Stagg was not optimistic about the invasion, offering a postponement to the supreme commander on June 4. On June 5, he advised that the weather would be tolerable for the landing on June 6th.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Grapes and Fires..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-grapes-and-fires-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-grapes-and-fires-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 3 Jun 2016 10:30:13 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

At Wiltz Drive to Claycut  a small grape arbor sits adjacent to the road.  It brought back memories of the Concord Grape arbors in Pennsylvania.  Residents would sink posts, connect bailing wire and plant the young vines in late February or early March.  Our vines were very old, producing enough sweet grapes for consumption and for my Mom to “can” jars of grape jelly.  Our neighbor, Lee Whitmire, had a larger, more developed arbor that enclosed a portion of his backyard.  This arbor was not only loaded with pods of grapes but also served as an inviting space.  I remember my grandfather often visiting Mr. Whitmire under the shade of the arbor during many hot, summer days. From grapes to fires.  In 1945 Albert Staehle drew a uniformed bear with the name inspired by New York City fireman “Smokey Joe” Martin. Officially it became Smokey Bear with no “the” in the middle. In 1947, Smokey’s trademark slogan, “Only You Can Prevent Forest Fires,” was added with Washington disc jockey Jackson Weaver as the voice of Smokey. As noted in “Acts of God, The Old Farmer’s Almanac,” in 1948 Forest Service artist, Rudy Wendelin presented the renderings of the fire prevention bear; familiar to us today.  The Smokey the Bear Act was passed by Congress, regulating the commercial use of the name and image; becoming the most popular symbol in the United States in 1952.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "A Hoax and Pap" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-hoax-and-pap-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-hoax-and-pap-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 2 Jun 2016 10:25:22 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In 1874, the editor of the Virginia Territorial Enterprise needed space to fill.  He concocted a story about a scientist who invented a suit called, "solar armor."  The scientist covered himself with a sponge-like material, saturated himself with water and set across the desert.  According to the article, they discovered the inventor perched on a rock, frozen solid and his beard was covered with frost; a foot-long icicle hung from his nose. The story had the trappings of scientific fact and the hoax was so successful, newspapers reprinted it. Perspiring lowers the body temperature, as more people die from dehydration in Death Valley than heat stroke. In closing, “Pap” Price was our grandfather and lived with us. The only television shows he enjoyed were "Studio Wrestling" and "The Lawrence Welk Show." He read the Ellwood City Ledger, Pittsburgh Post Gazette and The Grit, front-to-back, while chewing Mail Pouch Tobacco. Each night, he’d wind his pocket watch and announce, “Well… it’s time to put the body in bed.”  I remember Pap during our episodes of showers and thundershowers.  Early June thunderstorms were a blessing in western Pennsylvania, providing our garden with needed moisture for the early plants.  The storms also provided a moment when he and I would sit on the back porch glider watching and listening to the storms. When the thunder rolled, he would say, “Well… the angels are bowling…”


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "I Do and Another Season..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-i-do-and-another-season-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-i-do-and-another-season-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 2 Jun 2016 3:17:59 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Welcome to June with 19 days until summertime starts.  Society sections of local newspapers showcase engagements and weddings and June is a popular time to exchange vows. Long before air conditioning, antiperspirants and perfumes, hot temperatures and high humidity created some bothersome odors. To combat these “smells”, brides would carry a bouquet of flowers. The wedding bouquet and the tossing of such remains today as matrimony tradition. Years ago, roofs on houses were thatched with thick straw and no rafters. The straw protected dogs, cats, mice and bugs from the elements. During persistent showers, thunderstorms or a brief downpour, the animals and insects would fall from the roof. These episodes initiated the saying… “It’s raining cats and dogs.”  If your wedding is this weekend, showers are expected with less steam. Also, it’s Hurricane Season. Is there anything that produces a blast of wind stronger than a hurricane?  Yes, a human cough, with a gust of approximately 300 miles per hour.  Number two on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a sneeze, at 75 to 100 miles per hour. Taking a 9 pound 2-by-4 and firing it 34 mph into a window simulates the effects of a hurricane on coastal structures. Research verifies that building damage during a hurricane is caused by window and door failure.  Blowing through a home, walls force outward, collapsing the structure.  Hurricane resistant windows include a plastic interlayer and the building industry has been challenged to design products to further protect windows and doors from flying debris.


Permalink| Comments


]]>
Pat Shingleton: "Tis the Season..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-tis-the-season--84906/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-tis-the-season--84906/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 31 May 2016 10:26:08 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

As Hurricane Season 2016 begins today, 2014 was the last time we registered a land falling hurricane.  Arthur slipped along eastern North Carolina on July 4, 2015 and was the only storm since Superstorm Sandy. From 2006 to 2015, just 13 percentof Atlantic Hurricanes have hit mainland United States and is a record low for any 10-year period since the mid-1960s. Florida has experienced a hurricane drought and Texas has recorded more than seven years since Ike hit Houston. Complacency often settles in with such a long stretch of inactivity, especially with new coastal residents that haven't experienced devastating storms. When it comes to hurricane destruction it's water, not wind that claims lives. Potentially the most prolific killer in a stronger hurricane is storm surge, a term used to describe the rise in water level above normal tide in coastal areas as the hurricane's wind pushes water ashore. The National Hurricane Center has rolled out storm surge forecast maps which, instead of past forecasts relative to high or low tide, these forecasts will simply tell you how much water you can expect above ground level using a color code. While the forecast doesn't include waves riding atop the surge, or any additional water rise from heavy rainfall or rivers draining toward coastal areas, it is meant to give you an idea of the threat in the simplest terms possible.