WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Weather - Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2014, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Thu, 24 Apr 2014 12:04:09 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Pass the Salt-Please..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-pass-the-salt-please-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-pass-the-salt-please-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 23 Apr 2014 3:49:36 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In addition to tides, sunny, warm days are the ingredients in salt farming. Furthering our Wednesday column, salt farmers, or paludiers, collect the gourmet of all salts for use in renowned restaurants worldwide. Once a wooden gate traps sea water, a collection of clay walls promotes slow evaporation. Seepage leads to shallow pools and the appearance of the salt. Salt farmers use a tool, resembling swimming pool skimmers to gently drag what looks like a lattice of thin ice into a wicker basket. After skimming the top, the evaporation process continues, leaving the clay-bottomed basin loaded with coarse grey salt. Natural salt is less acidic and less sharp than industrial salts. With good weather, paludier's can harvest 60 tons of salt.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Salt of the Earth..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-salt-of-the-earth-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-salt-of-the-earth-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 22 Apr 2014 2:54:55 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Salt farming is dependent upon the weather and for French artisan farmers it's a labor of love. As noted in a previous column, the wind and the sun's heat create a high tide in Guerande, France; an area of marshy meadows, known as the "Cote Sauvage." Europeans have harvested salt from the earth in this place since the ninth century and salt farmers or paludiers use the same technique and tools to collect this caviar of salt. The collection process begins with a wooden gate that traps the sea water into the marsh. When the correct amount of water flows at the correct rate, a maze of clay walls advances a process of slow evaporation. After a month, the water seeps into shallow pools and salt appears. In tomorrow's column - harvesting salt.


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Pat Shingleton: "Vegetable gardening" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-vegetable-gardening-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-vegetable-gardening-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 21 Apr 2014 8:41:44 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Years ago, vegetable gardening wasn't a hobby it was an assignment. As noted in a previous column, fruits and vegetables planted and harvested were consumed during the cold months. Today, the task is a hobby enjoyed by my brother Kevin. He cranks-up his "roto-tiller" to prepare the garden and if it's on the "fritz," he "puts in the garden," as our grandfather would call it, the old way. The actual preparation in Western Pennsylvania began in February with what were called old storm windows. The elevated windows were placed over the seedlings and even though there was snow on the ground the window acted like a mini greenhouse. Kevin has "spaded the garden" just as Grandpap Price did when we were kids. He also visits his chiropractor the day after.


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Pat Shingleton: "Fill a prescription for the needy" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-fill-a-prescription-for-the-needy-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-fill-a-prescription-for-the-needy-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 20 Apr 2014 2:08:39 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Seventeen years ago Dr. Redfield Bryan and Father Mike Moroney asked me to construct a campaign to assist the St. Vincent de Paul Pharmacy. For the last 40 days and since 1999, "Fill a Prescription for the Needy" has raised nearly $980,000 in contributions from our community to provide life sustaining prescriptions for those who can't afford needed medicine. Michael Alcaldo, C.E.O. of St. Vincent de Paul noted that this campaign occurs at an important time of the year for the elderly and poor. The success of such a campaign is more than just the spokesperson as Lisa Hubble, Kay Kyes, Joe Cronan, Charlie Sides and a host of others tirelessly assist throughout the year. Most importantly thanks to all who deposited contributions into our canisters.


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Pat Shingleton: "Egg Coloring Tradition" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-egg-coloring-tradition-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-egg-coloring-tradition-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sat, 19 Apr 2014 1:58:17 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches originated the Easter tradition of coloring hardboiled eggs. This tradition represents eggs that are dyed red to represent the Blood of Christ, shed on the Cross and the hard shell of the egg symbolized the sealed Tomb of Christ. The cracking of the hard egg symbolizes Christ's resurrection from the dead. Our Easter egg hunts in Western Pennsylvania were held regardless of the weather. It wasn't unusual to find a colored egg plugged in a pocket of mud. A review of our picture albums and scrapbooks showed my Great-Aunt, Catherine, who shared holidays with us, sitting next to the dining room window with snow drifts outside on Easter Sunday. Those snow drifts held the Easter eggs that we later found after the spring thaw.


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Pat Shingleton: "Coloring Raw Eggs..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-coloring-raw-eggs-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-coloring-raw-eggs-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 18 Apr 2014 3:48:52 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Easter egg hunts in the northeast often include a few snow drifts. Our brother, Mike, resides in Rye Beach N.H., loves Easter egg hunts and is a whacky guy. As kids, he'd hoard his Halloween candy inside a heat duct never learning that the coal furnace melted his stash as soon as he stored it. He loved to color eggs and as most people color the hard-boiled eggs, he agitated his brothers by coloring raw eggs. When challenged, he'd blame his older brother Denis, brothers Kevin, Pat and Uncle Emery. To this day I'm still hesitant of cracking colored Easter eggs, unless I plan on having some bacon, ham and hash browns with them. Here's hopes that the Easter Bunny hops in with a big basket for you. Enjoy you egg-coloring tonight.


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Pat Shingleton: "Titanic Wierdness..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-titanic-wierdness-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-titanic-wierdness-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 16 Apr 2014 4:03:19 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:


"Pat Shingleton's Weather News" is just that, a gathering of items from sources such as The Almanac of the Infamous, Incredible and Ignored. On April 14, 1912, before the Titanic hit an iceberg, Rev. Charles Morgan fell into a fitful sleep filled with frantic voices and crashing waves. Hearing the hymn, "For Those in Peril on the Sea," he shared the dream with his congregation and led them in singing the hymn. News of the disaster reached his home in Winnipeg the next morning. On April 14, 1935, William Reeves, a lookout on a steamer from England to Canada, sensed danger, and remembered the anniversary of the Titanic disaster, 23 years earlier. Sounding the alarm, the ship stopped in a field of ice bergs. It's name? The "Titanian."


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Pat Shingleton: "Wind Swept Smelly Sauce" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wind-swept-smelly-sauce-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wind-swept-smelly-sauce-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 15 Apr 2014 8:43:10 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Our traditional northwest winds that accompany a frontal passage send "whiffs" to us that are either pleasant or offensive. The paper mills in the Felicianas eject a smell that reminds me of the Heinz plants in Pittsburgh. Flowers Baking Company on Florida Blvd. sends an aroma that reminds me of Mom's kitchen. A south wind advances the odor from the treatment plant near River Road. In Irwindale, CA. Huy Fong Foods manufacture Sriracha, a spicy Asian hot sauce. The production of the sauce can release a variety of odors from garlic, peppers and vinegar. Some residents don't like it, others don't mind it. Environmental scientists have been monitoring the odors at numerous locations. A good wind can move the "smell" or provide the aroma.


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Pat Shingleton: "Passover and the Passover Moon" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-passover-and-the-passover-moon-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-passover-and-the-passover-moon-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 14 Apr 2014 4:24:07 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Passover began last night at sunset (7:32 PM) and the official full moon rises tonight at 8:10 PM. Astronomers determine a full moon by calculating the percentage of illumination as tonight's moon will have 100% illumination. One school of thought suggests "light" was needed for the Israelites to leave Egypt, in darkness, and continue their journey out of bondage. Guiding them was a full moon, referred to as the Passover moon. As noted in previous columns, Easter is calculated as the first Sunday after the paschal full moon or after the vernal equinox that began on March 20th. Moon phase is a component in determining when Easter occurs during the Liturgical year. Lent began 37 days ago. Easter occurs anywhere between March 22 and April 25.


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Pat Shingleton: "What's Wind-Set Down?" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-what-s-wind-set-down-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-what-s-wind-set-down-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 13 Apr 2014 7:36:00 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

"Wind Setdown occurs when strong winds blow over water for an extended period of time, shifting the water body downward. As noted in a previous column, this shift causes a low-angle tilt and the upwind shore water level drops. "As the sun sank over the Nile Delta, a man stood on-shore raising his rod as a howling wind blew from the east. In the morning the sea was gone, blown to the west; permitting people to walk upon dry ground where the day before fish swam and boats sailed." The man was not Moses, as described in Exodus 14, but Major General Sir Alexander B. Tulloch, holding a surveyor's rod, not a staff, in 1882. On the western end of Lake Erie, numerous "wind setdown" events have dropped lake levels by two meters. More tomorrow.


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Pat Shingleton: "Wind Setdown?" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wind-setdown-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wind-setdown-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 13 Apr 2014 7:30:59 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Sunday's column noted an example of "wind setdown" when strong winds blow over water, shifting the water body downward and dropping the water level on the upwind shore. Weatherwise Magazine identified an episode of "wind setdown" in 1882 when Major General Sir Alexander B. Tullock was surveying coastal areas of the Red Sea. His experience was comparable to that of Moses in 1250 B.C. Researchers believe that "wind setdown" is comparable to a hurricane's storm surge. Every few years, on the western end of Lake Erie, "wind setdown" events have dropped the lake 2 meters. At Cedar Key Harbor in Florida on September 6, 2004, a 1 meter drop in water level occurred as Hurricane Frances passed. It then rose 1.5 meters above sea level in nine hours.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Roller..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-roller-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-roller-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 11 Apr 2014 3:00:20 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Our Mom, Grandma Shirley, will be 93 this week. She resides in the house where she was born that rests on an acre of land in Ellwood City, PA. We pool our resources to assist her in daily care, house cleaning and property management. Most lawns in that section of the country encounter damage from the winter weather and hers was further damaged due to access to her back door. She recently commented, "Patrick, there's lots of 'ruts' in the yard but we can get out the 'roller' to mend those." Imagine a 3-foot-long cement pipe, 2 feet in diameter. Stick a pipe in it, fill it with concrete, attach a metal brace, 2-by-4 and a handle. This was and is our "roller," constructed in the 1920s. That roller still works and has caused numerous hernias.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Masterful Course." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-masterful-course-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-masterful-course-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 10 Apr 2014 4:00:25 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The entrance to Augusta National includes 122 Magnolia trees that canopy the club's entrance. Nine years ago, my son Michael and I enjoyed the final rounds of The Masters. Our friend Paddy Quigley provided guidance, suggesting placement of portable chairs on #18 before walking the course. Our chairs were steps away from the playoff with Tiger Woods and Chris DeMarco. Augusta National embraces tree reforestation and a radar system that conserves water, reducing runoff. The parking area is unpaved to embrace natural absorption. Showers halted play as we were surprised to hear what sounded like an engine. Standing water and puddles on the greens were eliminated as underground suction devices removed the results of the shower; play resumed.


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Pat Shingleton: "Ike and His Trees..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ike-and-his-trees-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ike-and-his-trees-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 9 Apr 2014 3:26:10 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In 1943, Augusta National, home of The Masters, suspended play; transformed back into a farm to help the war effort. German prisoners-of- war provided renovation work to erect the famous bridge over Rae's Creek. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe, became a member of Augusta and a landmark bears his name -The Eisenhower Cabin. The other landmark was a loblolly pine, 210 yards from the tee on number 17. Ike hated the tree because his low draw compromised his second shot. Last February an ice storm toppled the 125 year old pine and it wasn't replaced. "Ike" was honored with the naming of another tree at the Dalmeny Golf Club in Scotland in 1946. An acorn from the tree was forwarded to Augusta to replant his tree.


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Pat Shingleton: "Stink Bugs, Azaleas, The Masters." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-stink-bugs-azaleas-the-masters-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-stink-bugs-azaleas-the-masters-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 8 Apr 2014 3:55:43 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Our azaleas traditionally "bloom out" by Mid-March, not the case this year. Groundskeepers and horticulturists at Augusta National control their blooming by covering, icing and even heating the plants. It has been an unusual Spring in the south and southeast. I reviewed a column written by Kaitlynn Riely of the Pittsburgh Post Gazette and a bug that invades the north each April. As noted in a previous column the brown, shield-shaped insect is native to Asia; first observed in Allentown, Pa. in 1998. The bug migrated south and caused extensive plant damage, four years ago across the Mid-Atlantic. Recent analysis found it identified in 29 states. Similar to our fire ants, it possesses an appropriate name, commonly referred to as...the Stink Bug.


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Pat Shingleton: "Looking, Listening, Acting..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-looking-listening-acting-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-looking-listening-acting-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 7 Apr 2014 3:59:08 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Our "Midnight Storms" caused an extensive amount of damage, especially in the Florida Blvd.-Sherwood Forest area. Large water oaks that have shallow root systems were brought down by straight-line winds. The tragic consequences of storm damage were especially evident on Nassau and Little John Avenues. Fortunately, there were no injuries. As weather broadcasters we constantly encourage viewers to prepare and stay alert, especially when a Tornado Watch and Storm Warnings are issued, as was the case Sunday evening. Residents Steve Decell and Chad Horton listened for the "sounds" of the storm and acted. Steve heard the hail, and sought a place of safety. Chad quickly gathered his boys, put them in the bathtub and covered them with a mattress.


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Pat Shingleton: "It's NOW the Dixie Alley..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-it-s-now-the-dixie-alley-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-it-s-now-the-dixie-alley-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 6 Apr 2014 11:22:42 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Over the past week, the Storm Prediction Center has targeted our area with a slight risk of severe weather on two occasions. AccuWeather.com noted four years ago that "Tornado Alley," including Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska and South Dakota, has shifted its threat area. The average number of tornadoes in this region is 225 through early April. Recently, experts believe that due to persistent Gulf moisture, a south-shifting jet stream and lingering winter time Canadian air, a decrease in the number of twisters in this region could be fewer than previous years. Climatologists have also validated that the Dixie Alley - including Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama is now the predominate tornado prone region in the United States.


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Pat Shingleton: "Carts on the Path..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-carts-on-the-path-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-carts-on-the-path-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Sun, 6 Apr 2014 10:53:10 AM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

"Carts on the path" is the customary vernacular of avid golfers after showers puddle a golf course. An inch of accumulated rain and a cart on a fairway rapdily causes damage and needed repairs for a greens superintendent. The directive means slower play and the need to "lift, clean and place" the ball during a round. Options include "carrying the bag," utilizing a pull cart or staying home. Two years ago, Bubba Watson, the 2012 Masters Champion, tested a possible solution to wet courses. At the Arizona Raven Golf Club he drove the BW1. The $20,000 hovercraft floats on 9 inches of air, skims greens, traps and water hazards. Experts note that it takes 36 hours for courses to drain and the BW1 has 33 time less weight than a typical golf cleat.


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Pat Shingleton: "Hey Pat, Go Fly A Kite!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hey-pat-go-fly-a-kite-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hey-pat-go-fly-a-kite-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 3 Apr 2014 3:57:14 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Aerodynamic design innovations have furthered kite flying to new "heights," including multiple line maneuvering. As noted in a previous column, the kite was first constructed in China 2800 years ago. Construction included silk and bamboo for a lightweight yet strong framework. In our early years, Nick Sudano's dad would construct our kites by using sections of the Ellwood City Ledger glued to strips of balsa wood with a long tail for additional stability. March and April were perfect for kites as strong cold fronts provided northwest winds that kept our kites aloft for hours. I enjoy kite flying on Santa Rosa Island, Pensacola. Today from 11 'til 6, the 10th Annual Kite Fest Louisiane is soaring at the West Baton Rouge Soccer Complex.


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Pat Shingleton: "Confusing Percentages..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-confusing-percentages-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-confusing-percentages-/ Weather - Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 2 Apr 2014 3:55:01 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In 2009, The American Meteorological Society noted that using percentages to forecast precipitation is a "confusing constant" for the general public. This prediction percentage was implemented in the late 60's with three psychological studies initiated by the University of Washington. The research respondents, college undergraduates, did not understand forecasts denoting percentages. Most of the participants believed a portion of an area or designated time period would receive a percentage of precipitation. When this system of forecasting was designed by the National Weather Service it outlined that within "a certain forecast area and during a forecast period "measurable" precipitation would be predicted by using a percentage."


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