WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2016, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Sun, 14 Feb 2016 23:02:51 GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "Cold Shoulders on Valentine's Day..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-cold-shoulders-on-valentine-s-day-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-cold-shoulders-on-valentine-s-day-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 12 Feb 2016 5:47:54 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

National Weather Service Offices in the Northeast are alerting residents that the coldest weather this year will blast New england and advance record setting lows into the Carolinas. A blast of Arctic cold in February 1899 was one of the most severe ever recorded. All-time record lows were logged in Milligan, OH at minus 39 degrees and Camp Clarke, NE at -47.  Local and state records were posted at Tallahassee dropping to -2 and Minden, LA with a frigid minus 16 degrees.  All time record lows are still on the books: Dallas at -8, Kansas City at -22, Washington D.C. at -15 and Lawrenceville, PA dropping to -39.  Adding to the super cold was a super blizzard from New Hampshire to Georgia with Virginia recording 40 inches of snow.  Once the cold blast made it to Baton Rouge, ice-floes blocked the Mississippi River at New Orleans for the second time in history. Finally, as you prepare your Valentine card, a reminder that it comes from of an interesting legend.  While in prison, it is believed that Valentine fell in love with the jailor’s daughter who visited him during his confinement. Before his death, he wrote her a letter, which he signed; 'From your Valentine.'  I’ve located a few Valentine’s Day cities and one that the editor won’t permit me to print outside Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Not much warmth today in Valentine, Nebraska.  Loveland, Colorado, Ohio and Oklahoma look lovely with rose deliveries in Belle Rose and St. Rose, Louisiana. Valentine's Day, 1895, and the all-time single snow event for our state recorded in Rayne, LA as two feet of snow was reported.


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Pat Shingleton: "The U.S.S. Macon and the U.S.S. Akron" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-u-s-s-macon-and-the-u-s-s-akron-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-u-s-s-macon-and-the-u-s-s-akron-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 11 Feb 2016 5:57:40 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

On February 12, 2012 the "L.E.M.V." or Long Endurance Multi-Intelligence Vehicle was tested at Lakehurst Naval Facility in New Jersey. This is the same location where the Hindenburg exploded on February 12, 1937. On February 12, 1935, another dergible, the U.S.S. Macon, completed a training mission near Santa Barbara, California.  South of Point Sur, the airship experienced squally weather that intensified. Lt. Commander Herbert Wiley was at the helm and quickly ordered an evasive maneuver to mitigate the compromising weather situation. At that moment a strong gust jarred the airship's fin. With the tail section of the craft in peril, efforts to control it were futile and to save his crew, Wiley immediately gave the order to abandon ship. Moments later it plunged to the sea surface. Fortunately, inflatable vests and rafts assisted in life saving efforts in addition to unusual warm water temperatures for that time of year. Rescue operations noted that all but two of the 83-member crew survived. The U.S.S. Macon's sister ship, the U.S.S. Akron, experienced a similar accident just two years earlier and unfortunately 73 crew members perished. One of the survivor's of that disaster was Lt.  Commander Wiley.

 


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Pat Shingleton:"February Oddities..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-february-oddities-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-february-oddities-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 10 Feb 2016 10:02:16 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Strange weather occurrences for early February include some reddish snow that fell on central France on February 10, 1869. Many thought the snow was colored by blood while a similar event happened on February 13, 1870 with an episode of red rain hitting Isle-sur-Serein, France on October 30, 1926. Red dust from the Sahara Desert was the culprit. On February 10, 1998, lightning ran through a mailbox post into the fingers, down the arm and through the elbow of a mail carrier in Colfax, LA. She received severe burns while her arm was resting on her car. February 9, 1994 is remembered as the worst ice storm since 1951 for the state of Mississippi. Three to six inches of ice over the northern sections of the state downed 8,000 power poles over 4,700 miles of power lines. More than 750,000 customers were without power for a month with $1.3 billion in damage.


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"Icing Down a Silo..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/icing-down-a-silo-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/icing-down-a-silo-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 9 Feb 2016 6:58:23 PM Pat Shingleton

The silo ice climbing championships began on January 16 and Don Brigg invented the idea.  Don is a renowned wrestling coach and years ago was working on a neighbor’s farm when he created a winter recreation in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Briggs duplicated a sport that is usually confined to steep mountains – ice climbing.  With a garden hose and shower heads he watered down a 70-foot grain silo and with temperatures ranging from zero to minus 17, he instantly created an ice mountain.  Briggs believed that if you build it they will climb it and that has certainly been the case for many years. Climbers are tethered to the silo as they straddle stalactites of ice.  In addition to the dozens of adventure seeking climbers, some as far away as China, the iced-up silos have offered  and additional attraction as ice sculptures. Also, during the early days of firefighting, getting the wet stuff onto the red stuff was a task.  Bucket brigades were recognized as the best method of firefighting and “stand pipes” were positioned and attached to the municipal water systems.  Freezing weather became an obstacle to fight the fire and to prevent a frozen line; traditional fire plugs were covered with manure, tanbark or straw. As the plug evolved to the hydrant, above ground nozzles were configured to avoid mud, snow and ice. Antennas are also attached to a hydrant for firefighters to easily recognize their location in case of heavy snowfall. Years ago, we shoveled snow from sidewalks and driveways as it was also our responsibility to clear the snow from the hydrant on our property.


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Pat Shingleton: "Big Snow-Big Blizzards..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-big-snow-big-blizzards-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-big-snow-big-blizzards-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 8 Feb 2016 7:15:25 PM Pat SHingleton Pat Shingleton:

New England will once again endure another snowstorm, nothing unusual for them during the winter months. The biggest blizzard in southern New England’s history banged Boston and coastal areas on February 6, 1978, with 27 inches of snow and for the first time in its 106-year-history, the Boston Globe was unable to deliver its paper with snow falling at a rate of four inches per hour.  In addition, 100 mile-per-hour winds were reported. For the New Hampshire Primary today, 34 weather advisories have been posted. Other spectacular storms include an early March storm called the Blizzard of 1888 from New England to Chesapeake Bay when 100 lives were lost at sea and another 400 died inland. The "'93 Storm of the Century" impacted 26 states with Burlington, Vermont registering daytime highs at minus12 with 40 inches of snow in Syracuse and 50 inches in the Catskills. New York City endured the "Blizzard of 2006" that included sustained winds similar to Baton Rouge on Monday-35 miles'per-hour. Residents of Mount Shasta weren't phased by the 189 inches of snow the occurred in 1959.  Acts of God-The Old Farmer’s Almanac notes in its “Blizzard Hall of Fame,” the Great Snow of 1717 was a series of four storms that extended to March 7th with five feet of snow in New England. Newspaper accounts reported that 95 percent of New England’s deer population died and residents remained indoors until the snow melted. Buffalo's "Blizzard of 1977" caused 177 deaths with a record 199 inches of snow and finally, Chicago's snowstorm of 1967 included 23 inches of snow and 76 deaths.


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Pat Shingleton: "Frozen Gas and Frostbite" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-frozen-gas-and-frostbite-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-frozen-gas-and-frostbite-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 5 Feb 2016 6:45:51 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

We're enjoying an early Mardi Gras this year that sends us more of a winter-type pattern rather than an early spring arrangement when the day falls into late February, we're also keeping warm through Fat Tuesday. With that noted, typically, natural gas, delivered to the home, is too dry to freeze.  However, if the pipe carrying the gas is exposed to temperatures of -20 degrees, freezing could occur.  Residual water, left in the line after installation or in a low spot could activate freezing. A few years ago, OGE Energy in Oklahoma City had an incident whereby natural gas froze at the well head due to temperatures dropping to zero.  It was the first time in 15 years that this occurred when the temperature in northeastern Oklahoma was colder than locations at the South Pole. Enogex transports 1.5 billion cubic feet of gas per day on its lines into the Midwest. When the mercury drops, ten percent of the gas supply could be compromised due to cold weather. As temperatures drop, the body attempts to generate more heat by shivering, a condition that increases muscle tone and heat. With plenty of winter remaining daily we note the record for cold weather survival. It began on February 2, 1967 when Canadian bush pilot Robert Gauchie ran out of fuel near the Arctic Circle.  Forced to land, he withstood temperatures of minus 48. He wasn’t rescued for 58 days and lost 54 pounds while suffering five frostbitten toes.  Gauchie spent most of his time inside the plane, tucked under six sleeping bags and consuming raw fish and emergency rations. He was saved by a persistent rescue pilot after extensive searches were cancel led.


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Pat Shingleton: "The First...WEATHERMAN..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-first-weatherman-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-first-weatherman-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 4 Feb 2016 6:26:25 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

John Jeffries was a Boston physician, scientist, and military surgeon with the British Army during the Revolutionary War. Jeffries is recognized as the first “weatherman.”  He was an early balloonist and accompanied Jean-Pierre Blanchard in 1785 as their balloon crossed the English Channel. During the flight, Dr. Jeffries took weather readings with a thermometer, barometer, and hydrometer - to measure humidity, an electrometer - to determine electrical activity, a timepiece, compass and telescope.  He also used a ribbon and scissors to determine the rise and fall of the balloon and a pen and pencil to ascertain if thin air affected their use. Today marks his birthday in 1744, known as National Weatherman’s Day. Thanks to Cookies by Design for their “Weatherman’s Day” gifts, the Valluzzo Family and Alzheimer's Services. Finally, I re-read David McCullough’s book, “1776” recently. There were numerous examples of how weather conditions truly changed the course of history, sometimes to benefit Washington’s army. A passage of interest included the weather as the Continental Army crossed the Delaware River on December 26, 1776. McCullough’s description and historical journal entries replicated what recently occurred in the northeast. To surprise the elite Hessian troops in Trenton, 2,400 soldiers, marched five miles in conditions that included cold driving rain, sleet, snow and hail. Many of the soldiers had no shoes. As the blizzard evolved, white-out conditions ensued and the Commander-In-Chief encouraged his men to stay with their officers to guide them into battle. The 45 minute battle resulted in 21 Hessians deaths, 900 prisoners and only four American injuries.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Moon and Rain..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-moon-and-rain-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-moon-and-rain-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 3 Feb 2016 6:34:13 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Our last full moon was January 24th, often referred to by Native Americans as the "Full Wolf Moon." The next full moon will be February 22nd, identified as the "Full Snow Moon." Smithsonian Magazine reports  that the moon may have additional influences to Earth. For many years it has been linked to the ebb and flow of ocean waters, compliments of the gravitational pull that cause the oceans to bulge toward it so slightly that water levels fluctuate. A new study suggests that the phase of the moon changes how much it rains on Earth. A doctoral student at the University of Washington detected a slight oscillation in Earth's air pressure that corresponded with different moon phases. Further research over 15 years of weather data corresponded to rainfall on Earth. The same forces that cause the tidal bulge or lumps in the Earth's oceans also cause another phenomenon. Researchers found that at any given time two opposing forces that create the bulges of water are caused by gravity while the other is caused by inertia. The side of the planet that is closer to the moon is drawn in by Earth's gravity and overcomes the inertia that pulls it in the opposite direction. On the opposite side, away from the moon's tug, inertia is greater than the gravity pull and forms another bulge. When the moon is directly overhead, atmospheric pressure glides with the atmospheric bulge and as high pressure is linked to higher temperatures, molecules heat, hold more moisture, reduces humidity and lower chances for rain. After moon-set, the tug weakens, lower air pressure is recorded and the colder air molecules can't hold the moisture and rain occurs. This data will assist in creating additional climate models.


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Pat Shingleton: "Into February" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-into-february-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-into-february-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 2 Feb 2016 7:34:41 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Due to a sinus infection I missed my weather broadcasts on Monday.  Just a couple of items as we move deeper into February, Now that fill enjoyed sunshine, an early Spring is forecast. Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania attracts thousands on February 2. Directly related to a single event, tourism has become one of the leading industries for this community,  Tuesday morning, the groundhog was “extracted” from his sleep, held before the crowd and then asked to make a prediction based upon his shadow. Each year, PETA or People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals contend that this action traumatizes Phil and believe Phil should be replaced with an “animatronics model.” Representatives of the Inner Circle of the Punxsutawney Groundhog Club believe Phil is treated better than the average child, kept in a climate controlled environment and annually inspected. An animatronics model is similar to the gopher that what was used in the movie Caddy Shack. As noted Phil’s prognostication is projecting an early Spring. Keep in mind Phil’s accuracy factor since 1867 is around 39%.  Over the year’s, Phil has seen his shadow 102 times, has not seen it 18 times and didn’t have a report nine times.  Phil Pastelok is recognized as an expert long-range meteorologist with AccuWeather.com’s Long-Range Forecasting Team and commented after the famous groundhog disclosed the forecast.  Pastelok believes that the next 180 days will be similar to the Groundhog Day movie – practically the same.  Possibly two big snow storms will hit the East. Potential flooding could occur in portions of the Tennessee Valley.  Abnormally warm Gulf Coast air could activate severe weather for our area into March. An above normal outbreak of tornadoes are anticipated from Louisiana to western Georgia and Tennessee.


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Pat Shingleton: "Beagles and Foreign Objects..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-beagles-and-foreign-objects-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-beagles-and-foreign-objects-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 29 Jan 2016 5:38:22 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

George Seaman raised Beagle dogs for rabbit hunting in the woods of Pennsylvania. George implemented a dog pen design that included fenced enclosures that surrounded the pen. The actual doghouse was situated on another end of the structure and was elevated from the ground by a couple-of-feet. This design provided a dual area for the Beagles to “do their business.” The meshed pen allowed the droppings to fall to the ground below. Relating to this description, a heavy snow provided an opportunity for our traditional snowball battles that stretched between the Minnet and Sudano yards, criss-crossing George’s property. The rules of engagement stressed that no “foreign objects” could be injected into a snowball. This included stones and gravel.  My brother Kevin conformed to the rules but creatively decided to insert another foreign object that met with limited consternation. The “do-do” from George’s beagles fell to the ground and froze. Kevin gathered a few and inserted them into the snowball. His direct hit on Johnnie Cornelius’s noggin,’ during the snowball battle, met with the delight of many. Johnnie wasn’t a favorite in the neighborhood.


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Pat Shingleton: "400 Years for 40 Inches?" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-400-years-for-40-inches-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-400-years-for-40-inches-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 28 Jan 2016 7:15:06 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Meteorologist Robert Gauthreaux handles our weekend weathercasts in addition to other assignments within our weather department. He received some data from the Southern Regional Climate Center and generated an on-air graphic from their message. The S.R.C.C.  targeted Glengary, West Virginia and their recent accumulation of snow. The community recorded 40 inches of snow from the single storm this past weekend  that buried many sections of their state and other cities into New England. Meteorologists from the Center decided to advance a comparison on how many "years" it would take for designated communities to accumulate that same amount of snow. The methodology doesn't reflect the odds of a one time storm event in a particular city but the time needed to totally achieve the matching accumulation. Some of the cities that regularly receive a winter-time accumulation included Memphis, Nashville and Knoxville. That same one day storm amount of 40 inches reflects that it would take Memphis ten years to do the same. It would be six years for Nashville and six years for Knoxville. Amarillo and Oklahoma City would capture their yearly amounts in two and five years with El Paso getting theirs in six. Dallas would make it in 25 years, Shreveport in 40 years and Jackson, Mississippi would get their 40 inches in 50 years with San Antonio not far behind at 57. Corpus Christi, Texas, would witness their 40 inch amount in 200 years. How about Houston, Texas and Baton Rouge? The projections reflect a 40 inch accumulation for both cities in 400 years!  My apologies, I don't believe I will be able to cover this accumulation, at lease here on Earth, for the next 370 years...


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Pat Shingleton: "Foam, P's and Q's" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-foam-p-s-and-q-s-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-foam-p-s-and-q-s-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 27 Jan 2016 10:44:02 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:
Coastal homes in the northeast are coated with ice from the weekend "Nor'easter." Sea water contains dissolved  salts, proteins, fats, and 
dead algae and is laced with organic matter and sea creature excrement. Shaking seawater in a beaker causes surface bubbles and foam.
This is replicated when the ocean is agitated from wind and waves.  Each "coast" manufactures foam in different ways and algae blooms
create thick sea foams, similar to shaving cream. When the blooms decay offshore the algal matter is churned by the surf.  As noted in a
previous column, most sea foam is safe, however, on the Gulf Coast, blooms of Karenia brevis create  aerosol toxins that irritates eyes with
possible respiratory afflictions. In "days-gone-by," local taverns and public houses or pubs provided lodging, food and drink, especially during
periods of inclement weather.  Libations were originally a convenient means of combating the winter chill and a “wee nip” could break the bone-chilling
cold. For politicians a journey was tedious and politicians would utilize their assistants to gauge the opinions of their constituents.  These assistants
were instructed to “sip some ale” and hear the people’s political concerns. When they would “go sip here” and “go sip there” the two words were
combined, forming the term “gossip.”  Ale would be served in pints and quarts. A bar maid needed to be diligent as to which patrons were
drinking a pint or a quart as this duty resulted in the phrase, “minding your ‘P’s’ and ‘
Q’s.”


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Pat Shingleton: "Careers in Weather" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-careers-in-weather-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-careers-in-weather-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 26 Jan 2016 10:31:22 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:
Dave Thurlow ran the Mount Washington Observatory in New Hampshire for many years and after retiring the position was furthered to Ken Rancourt. Cyrena Marie Briete now runs the observatory. A portion of her and her team's responsibilities include recording some of the coldest temperatures in the country. There is a consistent theme between these directors that there are  two winters: the astronomical winter starting December 21and ending March 21 and the meteorological winter for those that live farther north. As the meteorological winter is based upon weather, the astronomical winter is based on earth's position in orbit around the sun. The meteorological winter happens only when the average temperature stays below 30 degrees for three months and where the snow depth averages 10 inches for the same period. Scientists believe that true winter occurs in less than a third of the country, on a line from Boston to Salt Lake City to Anchorage. If the scientific study of the earth's atmosphere is of interest to your kids or grandkids then meteorology my be the ticket for the future. Two current broadcast meteorologists in Baton Rouge, our own Josh Eachus and Channel 9's Steve Caparotta are securing their PhD's at Louisiana State University. U.S. News and World Report verified that meteorology is one of the 50 best careers with strong growth expected over the next 10 years. The article was originally published in 2010 when employment growth for meteorologists was expected to be faster than the averages with an additional 1,400 jobs into 2018, representing a 15% expansion. Consulting firms and research groups offer increasing opportunities in the private sector. More than a third of atmospheric scientists are on the government federal payroll, primarily with the National weather Service. A bachelor's degree in meteorology is suggested with at least 24 hours in related courses.    

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Pat Shingleton: "Super Brown Frosty and Prayers..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-super-brown-frosty-and-prayers-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-super-brown-frosty-and-prayers-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 25 Jan 2016 7:07:45 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

After the dangers of the northeast blizzard subsided, snow related activities were launched.  In March, 1988, Myron L. Ace entered the Guinness Book of world Records by constructing a 63.5 foot snowman in Anchorage, Alaska. Myron's giant sculpture was finalized with the assistance of eight friends, one of whom was a skilled  crane operator who lifted 8-inch snow blocks to shape the snowman. Named "Super Frosty," it took three  weeks to complete> As residents enjoyed the structure, the city was hit by an unusual storm that created another interesting weather  feature. Anchorage was blasted with a dust storm that included 70 m.p.h. winds that turned the 63 foot masterpiece  into "Super Brown Frosty." In 1678, the towns of Fieschertal and Fliesch, located in the Swiss Alps, were flooded because of the Aletsch glacier. The flooding empowered residents to take a formal vow, praying that the Aletsch glaciers would stop growing. In addition to the prayer intentions, an annual procession was initiated to reduce the ice mass. Over a period of 300 years, the glacier gradually shrunk at a moderate rate that reduced the threat of flooding. Scientists determined that the glacier decreased 3.5 kilometers over three centuries. Four years ago  a lack of fresh water, residents have reversed their prayer intentions and now pray for the glacier to grow. Including an intervention from Pope Benedict XVI which is similar to the original vow sent to Pope Innocent XL.


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Pat Shingleton: "S.A.D. and Piano Lessons..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-s-a-d-and-piano-lessons-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-s-a-d-and-piano-lessons-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 22 Jan 2016 11:00:40 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The lack of sunshine can have an effect on our disposition. During a stint in Pittsburgh I prepared a board that identified 66 consecutive days with no sunshine.  In Baton Rouge we occasionally experience consecutive days of gloomy weather, including drizzly rain and showers.  Our weather can’t compare with Whidbey Island, Washington where they experience rain and overcast conditions for 260 days a year. Due to these conditions the suicide rate is high and duty deployment at the local naval base is limited to 18 months.  Many in the Pacific Northwest suffer from S.A.D. or Seasonal Affective Disorder, a specific type of major depression, which reoccurs at specific times of the year. The amount of sunlight exposure and changes in sunrise can affect suffers of S.A.D. The northeast blizzard reminded me of piano lessons.  Miriam Johnson was our piano teacher and her three worst students were me and my brothers Denis and Michael. More interested in sports than classical music,  it was a challenge for Mom to ensure that daily practices were completed.  Saturday morning's lesson began with a mile walk to  Miriam's house on Spring Avenue in Ellwood City, PA. The walk sometimes turned into a hike or journey in all types of weather. January winters were tricky regardless how "bundled" you were for the trip. Inevitably our hands  were fresh frozen when we reached the door of her home. Therapy for hands included a regimen of running cold water onto your digits, followed by warm water then hot water. I'm not sure if extra "water" fees were added to our lesson charges before we "tickled the ivories."


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Pat Shingleton: http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--80627/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--80627/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 21 Jan 2016 7:25:32 PM Pat Shingleton: "Blizzards and Burans..." Pat Shingleton:
The northeast is bracing for the blizzard with cancellations, closings and  winter weather alerts. Extreme blizzard conditions where blowing and 
falling snow reduces visibilities to the point where the sky and the ground appear totally white is a whiteout. One of the fiercest blizzards occurring
in the world is the purga or poorga that rolls across northern Siberia. With below zero temperatures, it includes wind-driven snow that
causes disorientation.  It also prevents humans from opening their eyes, the inability to breath and freezing to death within a few yards  
of their homes. A buran is a violent snowstorm that occurs in Southern Russia and sections of Siberia. With an injection of warmer air,
a buran fills the air with blinding snow that is much worse than a whiteout. Gavin Pretor-Pinney heads the Cloud Appreciation Society in
England and is the author of The Cloudspotter's Guide. His travels to Australia last include observing a remarkable, dramatic cloud formation
called the Morning Glory. The best place in the world to witness the Morning Glory is in the small village of Burketown in Australia's northern
Queensland. In September and October thousands visit it to see a huge white cloud that rolls like meringue and stretches 600 miles at speeds
of 35 m.p.h. Burketown lies between the northern wetlands and the southern grasslands of Queensland's Gulf region and the Morning Glory
forms through a unique combination of sea breeze, moisture and high pressure. The locals call them upside-down clouds as it stirs the dust
followed by dead calm. They also know it's on the way when the beer fridge's glass doors frost up and the corners of the cheap tables bend
upwards. 

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Pat Shingleton: "Sledding, Snowballs and The Mistake on the Lake." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-sledding-snowballs-and-the-mistake-on-the-lake-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-sledding-snowballs-and-the-mistake-on-the-lake-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 20 Jan 2016 7:04:28 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

Those of thus that “grew-up” with snow events still embrace the excitement of a snow event along the Gulf Coast and in South Louisiana.  WBRZ’s Brittany Weiss grew-up near Chicago and experienced a snow event here in 2014. As kids, we rode the snow with a sled, aluminum saucer or garbage can lid.  Overnight, Nicky Sudano hosed-down Windover Avenue that created an ice layer that increased the speed for us but stranded any motorists attempting to head "up hill."  Following a two to three feet snow event it was then "melt-down time." The process transformed the powder to squishy snow which was perfect for snowballs. A bowling-ball of snow was rolled into a boulder. Stacked end-to-end and vertically, these snow-forts were 20 feet apart with armies divided between the Shingleton's, Sudano's, and Minett's. The battle ended when local paperboy, Donnie Schlemmer, was bombarded with a cascade of snowballs from all directions as he delivered the afternoon edition of the Ellwood City Ledger. Advancing the message a few years, and  while at Gannon University in Erie, PA, many would refer to Erie as the "Mistake on the Lake."  During the winters of '93-'94, most of the Great Lake's surface was solid.  In '79, all of the Great Lakes were frozen.  On Memorial Day, '96, picnickers along Lake Superior's shoreline, cooled their drinks with ice floating in the lake.  Here, we use sand on bridges during episodes of freezing weather.  As mentioned in a column a few days ago, in the snow-belt locations, snow fences are placed near highways to prevent drifts onto the roadway. The fence reduces wind speed, increases turbulence, forcing the snow to pile downwind. 


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Pat Shingleton: "Mind Your Own..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-mind-your-own-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-mind-your-own-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 19 Jan 2016 10:31:22 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In the 1880s, Dr. Charles Fleet invented Chapstick. The tubular ointment contains camphor, beeswax, menthol, petrolatum, phenol and aloe. Chapstick sales increase during the winter months and one of its ingredients was used in the past for another application. Obviously, personal hygiene, years ago, was no where near necessary procedures today. Scars from smallpox and acne scars that developed by adulthood were treated with bee’s wax.  Women would cake their face with bee’s wax to fill and smooth their complexion.  During episodes of “gossipy” conversation or “staring” at another’s face, a customary retort was “mind your own bee’s wax.”  A smiling female face, loaded with bee’s wax initiated the term, “crack a smile” and finally, sitting too close to the fireplace began the expression, “you’re losing face.”


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Pat Shingleton: "The Coldest and Car-Hopping" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-coldest-and-car-hopping-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-coldest-and-car-hopping-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 18 Jan 2016 9:54:56 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

For many years a "cold war" has heated up between International Falls, Minnesota and Fraser, Colorado.  Both towns believe their official designation is the “Icebox of the Nation.” International Falls has made the claim for decades that it is the official “Icebox” and added a trademark to the moniker since the 1980s.  When the trademark expired in 2009, Fraser pounced. Fraser sits in a mountain valley that often has the nation’s coldest temperature. To promote the “Icebox of the Nation” designation festivals in both cities include frozen turkey bowling, “Icebox Days” and “Blast on the Border.”  There are other cities that could claim this honor such as Stanley, Idaho that has posted the most consecutive chilly days since 1995. In recognizing cold weather, in South Louisiana, car-hopping occurred at Hopper's on Florida Boulevard, many years ago, and current car-hopping spots may include various Sonic locations. Car hopping in Western Pennsylvania occurred after a heavy snow and our favorite jump-on spot was Pete Pavlovic's Store. With a half-foot of snow and a layer of ice on Brighton Road, cars would spin up a sharp incline chugging and straining trying to make it up the grade. We would hide behind Pete's store, waiting for the right moment to "hop the cars." The procedure included grasping the rear bumper at the right moment and with the automobile gaining speed we would glide down the road with our boots creating a snow wake. This act met with stern repercussions from Mom. Of all the kids doing the "hopping," Pete would only call Mom to let her know that "her boys" were hopping cars. At school the next day you could recognize others that were "hopping"... A black-and-blue lump and abrasion on the forehead was the tell-tale sign. A few dry spots on the road meant our boots stopped sliding as our heads met either the trunk or the bumper.


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Pat Shingleton: "Snow Sheds, Snow Fences and Babies" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-snow-sheds-snow-fences-and-babies-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-snow-sheds-snow-fences-and-babies-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 15 Jan 2016 6:37:49 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In the construction of the transcontinental railroad, snow from the Sierras to Sacramento created avalanches that wiped out stretches of rail. In 1887 engineers used beams from local timber to construct a sturdy device that furthered construction and kept the trains rolling. Railroad workers called them snow sheds and initially placed them over exposed track to funnel the sliding snow over the top of the tracks. Today, snow sheds remain a common method for combating the destructive force of avalanches on railroad and highway routes throughout the world and are now constructed with reinforced concrete and steel.  On steep slopes, snow fences anchor the snow packs. I remember in Western Pennsylvania snow fences stretched on open pastures to trap blowing snow from advancing to the  road surface. Here's another item of interest.  After the delivery of the baby initial procedures determine gender, health and weight.  Years ago, the Bulletin of the American Meteorology Society reported that weather may be a factor in the weight of a newborn. An article in the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology found that an increase of a single degree in air temperature during the first trimester could create a birth weight drop of 0.2 ounce. The study included the analysis of 12,000 children born in Aberdeen, Scotland over a six-year period.  Researchers determined that lighter babies were born during the winter months after being exposed to hotter weather in the early stages of pregnancy and those babies were an ounce lighter than those born in other seasons. Heat restricts blood vessels in the mother's body, diverting nutrients from the fetus. The findings may encourage the need to keep cool during heat waves where air conditioning is unavailable.  


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