WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2018, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Tue, 16 Jan 2018 HH:01:ss GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "January and Winter Storms..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-january-and-winter-storms-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-january-and-winter-storms-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 12 Jan 2018 6:42:16 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

A blizzard is a storm with sustained winds of 35  m.p.h. for three hours and blowing snow reducing visibilities to a quarter mile.  One of the worst winter storms to hit United States occurred on January 13,  in 1888. From the Great Plains to Texas, temperatures dropped, winds howled and snow fell as 235 perished in snowdrifts. Many bodies were not found until the spring thaw.  Later that same year on March 12th, the Great White Hurricane slammed the East Coast, lasting three days. The storm unloaded 50 inches of snow in Massachusetts with 50 foot snow drifts from Maryland to Canada.  The storm sank 200 ships and killed 400, including 100 seamen.  It is considered the worst blizzard in United States history. January is recognized as an extraordinary month for weather systems. On January 14, 2009, a storm system sent gusty winds to New York with light snow showers.  On the following day, calm, cold weather was reported.  Due to de-icing delays in Pittsburgh, US Airways Flight 1549 left LaGuardia Airport at 3:25 p.m. bound for Charlotte.  Less than 2 minutes after takeoff, at an altitude of 2,900 feet, a flock of Canadian geese struck the aircraft knocking-out both engines and sending the 150,000 pound Airbus A320 into a glide.  The plane was descending over the Bronx at 1,000 feet per minute and the plane’s Captain made a decision never before performed – ditching in the Hudson River. Captain Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger and First Officer Jeff Skiles safely off-loaded their passengers in 35 degrees and a wind chill value of 11.  


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Pat Shingleton: "Molasses and Plan Icing..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-molasses-and-plan-icing-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-molasses-and-plan-icing-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 11 Jan 2018 9:52:40 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Today marks the anniversary of “America’s most fascinating and surreal disaster.”  On January 11, 1919, Boston’s Daily Globe reported that “a cold air mass settled in.” The following morning, the mercury tumbled from 36 degrees to 20 at 2:00 p.m to 7 degrees at 10:00 PM to just 2 degrees.  Crews from the ship Miliero pumped a half million gallons of molasses from its warm hold into tanks holding existing cold molasses causing a bubbling churn that vibrated the tank’s walls.  Workers reported the walls were groaning. This process activated fermentation, aided by a temperature rise to 50. Then the top of the 58 foot tank blew and a 50 foot wave of 2 million gallons rushed over the streets killing 21, injuring 150. It was termed "America's most fascinating and surreal disaster...In closing, years ago, plane de-icing was randomly performed and is now a regimented, regulated procedure.  On this date in 1982, Air Florida Flight 90 crashed into the icy Potomac River, thirty seconds after takeoff from National Airport in Arlington, Virginia.  The casualty count noted 78 deaths, including four who were in cars on the 14th Street Bridge.  Weatherwise magazine noted that the National Transportation Safety Board determined the cause of the crash was the failure of pilots to abort the takeoff and for not activating anti-icing equipment. Ice on wings is dangerous because of additional weight and the loss of lift for the aircraft, causing drag on the aircraft’s body.  A wing can lose 30% of lift with a small accumulation of ice.


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Pat Shingleton: "Crazy Weather Occurrances..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-crazy-weather-occurrances-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-crazy-weather-occurrances-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 10 Jan 2018 11:04:33 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Louisiana has had its share of unusual weather occurrences along with others around the world. In 1865 a hailstorm hit France with iceballs dropping in such quantities that it didn't disappear for four days, covering an area of 21,000,000 cubic feet. Hurricane John in 1994 lasted 29 days and traveled more than 5,000 miles. Cape Disappointment, Washington has recorded 2,552 hours or more than 106 days of fog in the course of one year.  In 1998, Hurricane Mitch killed 11,000 people in Central America making it one of the deadliest hurricanes to hit the Caribbean since the Great Hurricane of 1780. In 1907, 12 tons of fish dropped from the sky in Switzerland transported from a lake 20 kilometers away The longest lightning flash occurred on October 13, 2001. It originated near Waco, Texas and moved north to Dallas covering 118 miles. One of the world's worst droughts caused a massive famine in northern and central China from 1876 to 1878 with a death toll of 13 million people. Eight percent of all cattle in Kansas died in a blizzard on January 13, 1886. The worst hailstorm occurred on June 11, 1990 with $625 million in damage on Colorado's front range. The record for the fastest speed of movement for a tornado and the longest tornado path is the Tri-State tornado of March 18, 1925. It maintained a heading for 183 of its 219 miles at a speed of 62 mph. Super-Typhoon Tip recorded a central pressure of 870 millibars with surface winds of 190 mph. 


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Pat Shingleton: "Snow Plows, Car Hopping and Skitchin'" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-snow-plows-car-hopping-and-skitchin-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-snow-plows-car-hopping-and-skitchin-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 9 Jan 2018 9:59:43 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Preparations for freezing weather in South Louisiana and the excitement from the December 8th snow event replicate our preparation prior to a hurricane including generators and food stuffs.  I've posted a couple of winter stories for your review. In our younger years, there was excitement at the approach of a snow storm.  Our dog, Pooch, was an outside dog but when the temperature dropped and the snow was flyin’ he went from the dog house to our basement for the night, next to Uncle Emery – there for other reasons.  Another treat were the North Sewickley Township snowplows.  The eight foot embankment in front of our house, at a 45 degree angle, was where you got the best blast.  We would await the snow plow, settle into the snow covered embankment and once the plow scrapped the road, we were covered – with three feet of snow. Weather like this was also perfect for "hopping cars" as we referred to it. Pete Pavlovic’s store was the high point of Brighton Road and also provided a hiding place to hop the cars.  As the vehicles spun and chugged up-the-hill on an ice-slicked road, we timed our “hitch-up” to go for the ride.  Hooking onto the bumper, like down-hill skiers, we’d glide like a bunch of kids on skate boards – without the boards.  A dry spot on the street was the danger zone.  Once your boots went from slick to dry, your head went into the trunk or bumper. When school resumed, many a neighborhood kid was identified as a “knot-head.” Pat Quigley did the same growing up in New Jersey and says it was called “skitchin.”


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Pat Shingleton: Smog and The Brass Monkey Warning... http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-smog-and-the-brass-monkey-warning-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-smog-and-the-brass-monkey-warning-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 9 Jan 2018 4:51:48 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton: Smog and The Brass Monkey Warning...

In 1948, smog filled the Monongahahela Valley in western Pennsylvania. Damaging oxides of nitrogen, halogen acids, zinc and lead claimed 20 lives with 2,000 afflicted with respiratory disorders.  Fog and industrial pollution created the worst episode of smog in London from January 5th through the 9th in 1952.  Stagnant air over the four day period found sulfur dioxide and particulate concentrations reaching deadly levels.  The smog was so thick that Londoners couldn't see their hands with outstretched arms, traffic stopped and only the blind could navigate. Close to 100,000 residents became sick as deaths from bronchitis and influenza increased ten times leaving 4,000 dead. Four years later, Parliament enacted the British Clean Air Bill as the burning of bituminous coal was banned.  Here's another tidbit...Early war ships were equipped with iron cannon balls, stacked next to the cannons. A method was devised to stack 30 cannon balls in a squared “pyramid” configuration with 16 balls on the bottom to one on top. The design saved space however the movement of the ship sent the balls rolling all over the deck and sometimes overboard. The solution was a metal plate called a “Monkey” that included 16 round indentations. To prevent the iron balls from rusting, the “Monkey” was unfortunately made of brass and brass contracts faster than iron in cold weather. When below freezing conditions occurred, the brass indentations shrunk and the iron cannonballs would lift off the “Monkey.” Thus the expression, ”its cold enough to freeze the (expletive deleted) off the Brass Monkey.”


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Pat Shingleton: "Bed Warmers, A Coal Delivery and Katie's Birthday" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bed-warmers-a-coal-delivery-and-katie-s-birthday-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-bed-warmers-a-coal-delivery-and-katie-s-birthday-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 5 Jan 2018 9:53:44 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The arrival of the coal truck was a treat for me and my older brother Kevin.  With faces pressed against the living room window, the coal-man positioned his dump truck adjacent to the basement “coal” window.” His metal chute was attached to the exterior and once the truck bed was elevated, here came the coal.  For us it was the excitement of watching a dump truck dump and the sound of the coal funneling down the chute then rumbling below us into the coal cellar. It sounded like bowling balls hitting a tin roof.  The only way the coal-man made his delivery was “if” the ground was frozen. A stuck truck was even more exciting. Homes built in the 1900s had limited insulation.  Even though the coal furnace was stoked for the overnight it did not provide adequate heat when the temperature dipped to -5.  Beds were kept warm with a brick, heated near the fireplace and wrapped in a towel while some used a traditional “bed warmer.”  This device looked like a giant skillet with a long handle and lid.  Coals, placed in the container, warmed the bed by passing the device between the sheets and the outer blankets.  As an early-morning paperboy, it wasn’t unusual to “hit-the-sack,” fully dressed, to avoid the morning chill at 6:00 AM. Finally, the first days of 1988 were "gnarly."  The daytime high for New Year's Day was 59 with chilly wind blown rain. On January 3, 1988, we hit 81 degrees, breaking a record high for the date of 80, logged in 1943.  Another front zipped through on January 4 sending the temperatures down 28 degrees from the previous day to a high of 52 and a freeze warning. The blustery weather lasted into the next day with an overnight low just shy of the freeze mark. By January 6 a major snowstorm was brewing in the Midwest while Baton Rouge experienced rain and 44 degrees. On January 7, 1988 two events occurred. A freeze warning was issued for the area with just 40 degrees for the high and Katie Shingleton was born. The following day,  Katie was transported home with some snow on the ground. Happy birthday Katie with great forecasts for you in the future.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Freeze Damages Your Course..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-freeze-damages-your-course-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-freeze-damages-your-course-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 4 Jan 2018 10:32:35 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Golf Professional, Bobby Jacks, diligently monitors weather situations, alerting members as to course conditions.  If its too soggy, the carts are "on the path" and if its too cold - the course will open when its warmer. Grass becomes brittle when frozen as a result of crystallized dew.  A blade of grass contains 90% water and soon as the temperature drops, the freezing of the blade is accelerated. Stepping on a frosty tee box causes the plant to break as the cell walls rupture. This causes the greens and putting surface to become too thin, due to the weakening of the plant. Damaged grass blades also become more susceptible to disease. Reduced mowing heights can really damage greens that are covered with frost. So when the pro asks you to wait until the frost is gone, grab a cup of coffee before you tee-it-up as you're helping the course. 


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Pat Shingleton: " Origination of "Blizzard" and The Florentine Codex" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-origination-of-blizzard-and-the-florentine-codex-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-origination-of-blizzard-and-the-florentine-codex-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 3 Jan 2018 10:31:24 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

They are inferring that the system rolling up the Atlantic this weekend is a "Bomb..." It will create blizzard conditions in New England.  “Blizzard” originally meant “a stunning blow,” often referred to a boxer’s knockout punch.  Davy Crockett, no relation to Jennifer, used the word in reference to a barrage of rifle shot at a deer and to “taking a blizzard” to his prey.  On March 24, 1870 the editor of the Iowa newspaper, the Easterville Vindicator, described a massive wind-driven snow event as a blizzard. He compared the event to a severe snowstorm that K.O.’ed the city.  The following Spring, an Iowa baseball team changed its name to the Blizzards and within ten years numerous newspapers from New York to Canada were referencing their winter storms as blizzards. In closing, the Florentine Codex is an account of the Spanish conquest of Mexico in the mid-sixteenth century.  It was an almanac and journal of virtually every aspect of the campaign including weather events. The Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society reported that the Codex identified the earliest documented tornado in the Americas in August, 1521. In Book XII, prior to the fall of Mexico-Tenochtitlan, a heavy storm was accompanied by a whirlwind that struck the Basin of Mexico.  The whirlwind hovered above Tlatelolco, Tenochtitlan’s twin city, before moving to a nearby lake and disappearing.  Researchers have compared this account with contemporary European descriptions of tornadoes and waterspouts, verifying the tornado. It also predates the Cambridge, MA tornado of 1680, representing the earliest documented twister in the Americas.


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Pat Shingleton: "A Purga and a Buran..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-purga-and-a-buran-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-a-purga-and-a-buran-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 2 Jan 2018 10:42:03 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Erie, Pennsylvania recorded their largest snowfall amount on December 26th and this weekend most of New England will experience the same. One of the fiercest blizzards of the world is the purga or poorga that barrels across northern Siberia. With below zero temperatures, it is filled with wind-driven snow that causes disorientation that prevents humans from opening their eyes and are also unable to breath. In years past many have frozen them to death within a few yards of their home.  A buran is a violent snowstorm that occurs over southern Russia and Siberia. With warmer air temperatures, it too fills the air with blinding snow.


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Pat Shingleton: "Weather Sayings..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-weather-sayings-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-weather-sayings-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 1 Jan 2018 10:37:49 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

If you are a firewood distributor you may have suffered through sales the last few years, making up for it possibly in 2018. We registered five freezes in 2017 and by the end of this week we will quickly register six freezes to start the year. Welcome to a new year and this story. On a reservation in South Dakota, Native Americans asked their chief if the winter was going to be cold?  Unaware of ancient forecasting secrets he visited the National Weather Service. The meteorologist verified it was going to be cold and the chief ordered his tribe to collect wood. A week later he called the local N.W.S. office asking again if the winter would be cold?  Another meteorologist responded that it would. He ordered the collection of more wood and two weeks later questioned the N.W.S. folks to be sure it would be a cold winter. “Absolutely,” the meteorologist replied, “the coldest ever!” The chief asked, “How can you be sure?”  The meteorologist replied (here it comes)…”The Native Americans are collecting a lot of firewood.” Adding to that one,I archived another from my favorite brother-in-law, Frank Kean, and an interesting historical trivia expression that is also timely, concerning the levels of the Mississippi River.  In Frank’s e-mail, the “saying” was discovered by Benny Lopoo. You may have recognize the expression, “God willing the creeks don’t rise;” referring to an episode of flooding. Benjamin Hawkins was a politician and diplomat who handled “Indian Affairs.” His encounters with a particular tribe of Native Americans, is the basis for this expression.  When the President of the United States abruptly ordered Hawkins to Washington, during an Indian rebellion, Hawkins relayed the saying to his wife and expecting safe passage through hostile territory he capitalized the word “Creek.” Hawkins was referring to the Creek Indian tribe not a possible episode of rising water and flooding.


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Pat Shingleton: "New Year's Traditions..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-new-year-s-traditions-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-new-year-s-traditions-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 29 Dec 2017 10:30:29 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

 

Whether you plan watching a ball or a red stick drop, traditions continue. On  January 1, 1907, The New York Times moved its offices to a building on a square that now bears its name. To commemorate the paper's new home, Publisher Alfred Ochs provided a lavish New Year's celebration intended to attract parishioners from Trinity Church in lower Manhattan. The church was traditionally the gathering place on New Year's Eve as 200,000 people celebrated New Year's Eve for the first time, 106 years ago, in the newly-named Times Square. That same year, Ochs added a 700-pound ball, five feet in diameter that was made of iron and wood, covered with lights. Weather for the first event was 52 degrees with light rain. In 1917 it was minus 13 degrees with snow. New Year's Day traditions to ensure health and prosperity in 2016 include the consumption of pork, knackwurst, bratwurst, kielbasa, sauerkraut, applesauce or black eyed peas. To avoid getting hit by lightning this year, burn the Yule log. Traditional beliefs found that lightning would never hit a house with a smoldering block of oak.  Roman generals wore laurel wreaths and sealskin coats during episodes of thunder. French peasants would carry "pierres de tonnerre" or thunderstones in their pockets to ward off lightning. And finally you may want to ring a bell. Church bells in medieval Europe have the inscription: "Fulgura Frango" meaning "I break up lightning strokes." Finally, my brother Kevin and Dave Moore are hosting the tenth year of a tradition that Kevin remembers from our years in Pittsburgh. Back then, Gus Brickner would crack the ice and  jump or dive into the Monongahela River to usher in the New Year. Kevin and Dave did the same this morning on the rapidly rising Mississippi River in Baton Rouge.  Dave and Kevin have been assisted by the Moore Family, Pat Flanagan, Boots Garland and other Baton Rouge dignitaries in raising money for this event. Ice was provided by Baton Rouge Water and proceeds from the event will benefit the Pat Shingleton Retirement Fund.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Avalanche and... the Blizzard Hall of Fame..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-avalanche-and-the-blizzard-hall-of-fame-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-avalanche-and-the-blizzard-hall-of-fame-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 28 Dec 2017 10:29:10 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Ski resorts from British Columbia to Utah and Colorado are currently monitoring avalanche consequences.  There are two classifications of avalanches: loose snow and slab.  Loose snow avalanches are fairly minor and form when powder snow falls on mountain peaks and cascades down the slopes. This type of avalanche rarely causes casualties however slab avalanches are deadly.  Slab avalanches can transport trees, rocks and other debris on their journey down the slope.  Temperature changes alternate the sequences of freezing and thawing within the snow pack. This process also strengthens the snow pack during these periods of melting. Avalanches can occur at any time and are more numerous in spring when the entire structure releases from the slab. Acts of God, The Old Farmer’s Almanac, compiled a list of events that were placed into The Blizzard Hall of Fame. On December 26, 1778, nine German mercenaries froze at their posts in Newport, Rhode Island that later became known as the Hessian Storm.  As it struck southern New England, fifty people died in subzero temperatures that included an 18-inch snowfall. Offshore gales, associated with the storm, beached 28 vessels on Staten Island. The Blizzard Hall of Fame also recognized an event on December 26, 1947, when one of New York’s deepest snowfalls put 27 inches of new snow on the ground in Central Park in 24 hours. Twenty seven people died from the storm and snow removal costs rocketed to $8 million.



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Pat Shingleton: "Chester Greenwood and Ear Muffs" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-chester-greenwood-and-ear-muffs-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-chester-greenwood-and-ear-muffs-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 27 Dec 2017 10:29:04 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Many of you may be donning hoods and ear muffs today.  Appropriately we'll repeat a story about Chester Greenwood. He was cursed with ears that throbbed and ached anytime he was cold. His ears would change color when the temperature dipped below freezing, first turning pale white, then vivid red and finally blue. Chester had no trouble doing chores when the weather was above freezing, but once the mercury dropped, he dropped inside to get next to the fire. Chester would wear a heavy towel around his head to protect his ears and when ice skating he tied a scarf around his head, resulting in an unbearable itch. Allergic to wool, his ears either ached or were itchy. Every year, Farmington, Maine honors their favorite son. His doctor determined that his ears were allergic to wool and very sensitive to cold weather.  With some assistance from his grandmother, Chester solved the problem by looping two pieces of wire with fur sewn to the ends.  According to the United States Patent Office, he patented a device that included a steel band that secured the fur pads, and called it Greenwood's Champion Ear Protectors. He later formed the Greenwood Ear Protector Factory.  For 159 years they’ve been known as "ear muffs" and Chester's hometown of Farmington is recognized as the Earmuff Capital of the World.  The first Saturday in December celebrates his birthday, including an Ear Muff Parade.


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Pat Shingleton: "Sledding and Erie, PA." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-sledding-and-erie-pa-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-sledding-and-erie-pa-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 26 Dec 2017 10:29:47 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The day after Christmas was a time to visit your buddies to see what they got. Weather permitting, we also tested out the Flexible Flyers. It was rare if we didn't get a good dumping of snow around Christmas. The Sudano brothers were smoking cigarettes at the age of 8 and were also in charge of the bonfire, at the bottom of the sledding trail. The night before, "the hill" was watered down and as the temps dropped - ice formed. By morning, cars couldn't get up the icy mound but the sleds sure went down. The trail cut across Longview Drive, just to the left of Aunt Mae's house and ended in the woods with a series of homemade "jumps", putting us airborne. It ended not far from Nick and Tom's fire. In the fire was lunch that consisted of baked potatoes and apples, wrapped in "aluminum foil." In closing, Erie, Pennsylvania recorded its largest 24 to 36 inch snow episode ever... Acts of God, The Old Farmer’s Almanac compiled a list of events that were placed into The Blizzard Hall of Fame. On December 26, 1778, nine German mercenaries froze at their posts in Newport, Rhode Island that later became known as the Hessian Storm.  As it struck southern New England, fifty people died in subzero temperatures that included an 18-inch snowfall. Offshore gales, associated with the storm, beached 28 vessels on Staten Island. The Blizzard Hall of Fame also recognized an event on December 26, 1947, when one of New York’s deepest snowfalls put 27 inches of new snow on the ground in Central Park in 24 hours. Twenty seven people died from the storm and snow removal costs rocketed to $8 million.


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Pat Shingleton: "Kev, the Puppy and Snow Load..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-kev-the-puppy-and-snow-load-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-kev-the-puppy-and-snow-load-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 15 Dec 2017 9:56:05 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

To complete the Christmas assignments, Mom got the kids “out of the house.”  Sled riding and snow-football were options however a freezing rain-snow-mix meant indoor boredom. When I was eight-years-old and my little brother Kevin was five, we found plenty of things-to-do.  Playing “cars,” Lincoln logs or the Erector Set were options. Looking out the window sometimes found a fight or an arrest across the street at the Kennard’s house.  Circular streamers were used to decorate the Christmas trees. Today they resemble a “crepe paper lei” and noticing a garland streamer, dangling from the tree, I tied it to Kevin’s ankle. From an adjacent room I yelled, “Yo, Kev, Santa brought us an early gift, a puppy!”  He barreled after me dragging a decorated ten foot tree.... In closing, on this date in 1973, Central Connecticut received a crippling storm causing more damage than the famous New England Hurricane of 1938.  Power outages were the worst in New England history as lines snapped, putting thousands of homes without electricity.  In year’s past, we experienced power outages from snow and its weight on trees and roofs. The worst ice storm in U.S. history struck the south from January 28 through February 1, 1951.  The load of ice carried on the sides of an average evergreen tree 50 feet high and 20 feet wide would be five tons. 


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Pat Shingleton: "Falling Snakes and Earthquakes..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-falling-snakes-and-earthquakes-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-falling-snakes-and-earthquakes-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 14 Dec 2017 10:31:42 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

During the morning hours of December 15, 1876, in Memphis, TN, light rain turned to torrential downpours lasting about 15 minutes.  Acts of God, The Old Farmer’s Almanac reports that dark brown snakes measuring 12 to 18 inches long were crawling all over Vance Street. The snakes took over the sidewalks, streets, yards, and street gutters.  There were no witnesses that the snakes fell from the sky and there were no snakes on higher places such as rooftops. Many believed it was a hoax and no plausible evidence resolved the mystery.  On October 23, 1947 thousands of fish fell on Main and Monroe streets in Marksville, Louisiana. Finally, Scottish naturalist John Bradbury explored the Mississippi River on a flatboat for the Botanical Society of Liverpool.  On the evening of December 15, 1811, he and his crew moored at a small island on the horseshoe bend of the river for the night.  In the early morning they were awakened and Bradbury’s journal notes that multiple earthquakes rumbled through the area known as New Madrid.  The shocks continued until daybreak with extensive damage along the shore as Bradbury and his crew noted that the river was covered with foam as empty boats floated by with no cargo or crew.  In the first series of shocks, witnesses noted that acres of riverbank crashed into the channel in huge columns creating eight foot swells. It is known today as the New Madrid Shocks.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Sliding Lady and A Head Thump..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-sliding-lady-and-a-head-thump-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-sliding-lady-and-a-head-thump-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 13 Dec 2017 10:29:27 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:


Pennsylvania, New York and Ohio are experiencing a heavy hit of snow today and here's a snow story from my past that noted the effects of weather and the disciplinary actions of my father.  After mass at St. Agatha’s Church in Ellwood City, PA, our Dad would routinely purchase either the Youngstown Vindicator or the Pittsburgh Press at a news cart always parked outside the church.  This particular Sunday was snowy as sheets of ice coated the sidewalks and church steps.  Standing outside the church, visiting with friends, a robust lady proceeded down the steps, lost her balance, slipped on the ice and went airborne. Spinning and swirling across the icy sidewalk in the midst of ohhhhs and ahhhs she landed at the feet of my brother Mike and me. For every action there’s an equal and opposite reaction…Our Dad was a butcher and had huge hands. Whenever a disciplinary action was initiated a curled middle finger protruding from the fist created the “thump;” directed at the back of the head. So, as the lady slid to our feet, I imitated an umpire and yelled, “Safe!” Thinking Mike made fun of the sliding lady, Dad gave him the “thump” while I got the laughs.


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Pat Shingleton: "Stages of Snow and Weather Songs..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-stages-of-snow-and-weather-songs-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-stages-of-snow-and-weather-songs-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 12 Dec 2017 9:59:07 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:


On December 11, 2008, snowfall depths ranged from three to eight inches in the Baton Rouge area.  Of course last Friday's snow event found depths ranging from 2 to 3 inches in Baton Rouge and higher coverage northwest of the city. Stages of snow begin eight miles above the earth where water vapor condenses and becomes liquid.  As the droplets grow, ice crystals form around tiny particles floating in the atmosphere. The third stage identifies snow crystals depicting a six-sided molecular structure and depending upon the atmospheric temperature they take on different forms as plates, needles, dendrites and hollow columns and additional water vapor condenses onto the crystals and they enlarge. Increased weight causes the crystals to fall into warmer air forming larger flakes. In closing, the Bob Dylan classic "Blowin' in the Wind" wasn't referring to dust, snow or rain but the answer. Let's jog your memory with these weather songs and symphonies. Name this Rolling Stones hit?: A. "Cry Like a Rainstorm" B. "Lighting Strikes" C. "Have You Ever Seen the Rain" or D. "Get Off of My Cloud."  "Get Off of My Cloud" was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, Linda Ronstadt wrote "Cry Like a Rainstorm," Lou Christie wrote "Lightning Strikes" and Creedance Clearwater Revival wrote, "Have You Ever Seen Rain." Which of the following symphonies portrays a quiet countryside and thunderstorms? A. Haydn's 100th. B. Beethoven's 6th. C. Mozart's 40th or D. Dvorak's 9th. The answer to that one is "B." "Through early morning fog I see, visions of things to be, the pains that are withheld for me, I realize and I can see" comes from a popular television series - "M.A.S.H."


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Pat Shingleton: "Coats and Peanuts..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-coats-and-peanuts-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-coats-and-peanuts-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 8 Dec 2017 8:35:00 AM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

In December, 2008 we were preparing for our "Pat's Coats for Kids" distribution.  Traditionally, the school counselors arrive at the back parking lot of WBRZ and secure the needed coats for their kids. Similar to 2008, closed schools and tricky travel prevented the distribution and will be completed on Monday. The comic strip “Peanuts” would regularly depict a variety of weather scenes that included Snoopy sunbathing atop his box, Lucy carrying an umbrella, and Charlie Brown shoveling snow. The Little Blue Book notes that on December 9, 1965, “A Charlie Brown Christmas” premiered on television and was based on the Infancy Narrative of St. Luke as Charlie tries to find the true meaning of Christmas.  The program won an Emmy and a Peabody Award that resulted in 30 additional Peanuts shows.  Peanuts creator, Charles Schultz’s first job was a cartoonist at the Catholic magazine, Timeless Topix. His cartoon strip was retired in January, 2000 and when the final “Peanuts” cartoon appeared in the Sunday papers, he died in his sleep on February 12, 2000.


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Pat Shingleton: "12/7/'41 and Snow Sheds" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-12-7-41-and-snow-sheds-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-12-7-41-and-snow-sheds-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 6 Dec 2017 10:37:53 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Weather forecasting was in its infancy before the attack on Pearl Harbor on this date in 1941.  Weather served as a convenient coding for covert messages that Japan sent to overseas officials leading up to the attack. When Japanese-Soviet relations were broken the message would read, KITA NO KAZE KUMORI or “north wind, cloudy.” If Japanese-British ties were to be cut, the message would read NISHI NO KAZE HARE or “West wind, clear” and if Japan was severing relations with the United States, the message would read HIGASHI NO KAZE AME, or “East wind, rain.” The message would appear at the end of shortwave radio reports alerting officials to destroy all sensitive documents. Also, one of the many hazards included in the construction of the transcontinental railroad was snow.  Massive amounts of snow from the Sierras eastward to Sacramento created avalanches that often wiped out newly constructed stretches of rail. In 1887 engineers utilized heavy beams from local timber to construct a sturdy device that not only furthered construction but keep the trains rolling, even today. They're called snow sheds and initially were placed over several miles of exposed track to funnel the sliding snow over the top of the tracks. Today the snow sheds remain a common method for combating the destructive force of avalanches on railroad and highway routes throughout the world.  Instead of wood they are constructed with reinforced concrete and steel.  On steep slopes, dangerous snow conditions are lessened by installing snow fences that anchor the snow packs.


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