WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2018, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Sat, 22 Sep 2018 HH:09:ss GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "The Dyerville Giant and a Cleansing..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-dyerville-giant-and-a-cleansing-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-dyerville-giant-and-a-cleansing-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 19 Sep 2018 9:50:44 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

In 1980 a significant drought was evident within the southern tier of states and Baton Rouge.  The ever-present afternoon-evening convective showers we also comprised.  I remember numerous areas of brown grass along the interstate systems in addition to multiple episodes of grass fires throughout the viewing area. Possibly this sets-the-stage for the following, borrowed from “Mission 2000.”  “The 1,500-year-old Dyerville Giant was the world’s third-tallest redwood.  Measuring 17 feet in diameter and 360 feet tall, it was the pride of California’s Humbold Redwoods State Park. Torrential rain felled it in May 1991.  The park’s superintendent, Don Hoyle, explained that redwood trees depend on each other for support. He said, “It’s like a domino effect, with their roots intertwined. Redwoods have relatively shallow roots and they don’t have a tap root.  Their roots are like a mat and they help each other to stand up. In borrowing previous postings here is another replicating the consequences in the Carolinas.  "Until the end of the year, experts will determine the amount of damage to the oyster beds  in the Gulf from Katrina. Hurricane Fran in 1996 and Hurricanes Dennis, Floyd and Irene in 1999 battered Pamlico Sound and the Neuse River and Estuary in eastern North Carolina. Following the storms, researchers from North Caroliana State University reported that most species of fish eventually regained their health and population levels. Water quality dropped immediately after these storms but the study indicated that 21 water sampling locations  returned to normal.  The research suggests that the storms may have cleansed the waterway of a micro-organisms, harmful to fish in a large area prior to the storms. The Pfiesteria piscicida micro-organism that was blamed for fish kills and human illness in the 90s was washed into areas where it was unable to prosper. What didn't bounce back is the blue crab population due to the hurricanes and over fishing."

 


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Pat Shingleton: "Smog and Gramps" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-smog-and-gramps-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-smog-and-gramps-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 18 Sep 2018 10:59:01 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

There are ninety-eight areas in the United States, including the Baton Rouge area, that do not meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ground-level ozone. Ground level ozone is a primary constituent of smog. The term smog was first coined by a British meteorologist in 1905 to describe the combination of smoke and fog.The Big Smog of Donora lasted for nearly a week from October 25 through October 31, 1948. It settled over a section of the Monongahela Valley near Donora in southwestern Pennsylvania and was caused by emissions from factories and automobile exhausts. Smog, now referred to as Ozone, is composed of damaging chemicals such as oxides of nitrogen, halogen acids, zinc, lead, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. After the Donora Smog blew away, 20 people died with 2,000 afflicted with respiratory and circulatory disorders. Hundreds experienced nausea and eye and throat irritations. In closing, our grandfather, Bert Price, lived with us. A man of simple means, intrigued with farm equipment, he never obtained a driver’s license and did the majority of his transportation on foot. After his retirement as a railroad switchman, he provided a variety of services throughout the neighborhood. When weeds needed clearing from a steep embankment, Bert got the call.  The embankment angle was too steep for lawn mowers, so he used a sickle and scythe. The scythe had a four foot curved cutting blade, attached to a long handle, held with both hands. Long slow swipes cleared the weeds. For narrow areas, the hand-held sickle was effective. Both were kept sharp with a wet-stone. When Briggs and Stratton mowers were compromised by rain, Bert stayed on the job without consequence.


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Pat Shingleton: "Damage to the Rivers and Canning" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-damage-to-the-rivers-and-canning-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-damage-to-the-rivers-and-canning-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 14 Sep 2018 5:00:14 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On September 16, 2005, Ophelia scraped the Carolina coast with winds at 85 m.p.h. Carolinians remember 1999 and Hurricanes Dennis, Floyd and Irene. Recovery operations from those storms lasted through the end of 1999. The nation's largest lagoonal estuary at Pamlico Sound in North Carolina was also altered. For six weeks, the entire water content of Pamlico Sound was replaced by flooding. The University of North Carolina's Institute of Marine Sciences released its research on the effects of the storms. Pamlico Sound has only four small inlets that restrict water exchange to the sea. What occurred over the six-week period normally would take a year, displacing three-fourths of the sound's volume. Salinity declined by two-thirds and the sound's annual intake of nitrogen increased more than 50 percent. Pamlico Sound is a valuable mid-Atlantic fish nursery. Numerous marine organisms died then, because of the storms, and it is expected to be replicated because of Florence. In closing, it’s nearly harvest time in south Louisiana, especially for the sugar cane crop. In our "younger days," the purchase of the “deep-freezer” by my dad in the 1960s became a storage locker for the fruits and vegetables from our property in Ellwood City, PA.  Fruit trees included: apple, pear, peach, plum and a grape arbor; producing enough fruit for jams and jellies and an apple pie throughout the year.  Our garden provided an abundance of tomatoes, beans, potatoes, carrots, lettuce and rhubarb. In September, tomatoes were “pureed” into juice, a recipe my brother Kevin still uses in his famous spaghetti sauce. I remember the sweet corn harvest and the assembly-line process of ears being blanched, cut from the cob, packed and loaded into the deep freeze.


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Pat Shingleton: "Floyd, the Carolinas and Candles..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-floyd-the-carolinas-and-candles-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-floyd-the-carolinas-and-candles-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 13 Sep 2018 10:27:37 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Seven years ago, Hurricanes Igor and Julia reached Category 4 status, marking the first time since September 16, 1926 that two Category 4 hurricanes existed in the Atlantic at the same time for only 6 hours. September 16, 1999, was a day of unprecedented devastation for North Carolina.  Hurricane Floyd unloaded 20 inches of rain, causing flooding never before experienced in the Carolina’s. Sewage flowing down Cape Fear River stretched 50 miles past Wilmington and 20 miles into the Atlantic.  Municipal treatment plants overflowed with fears of environmental disasters from gas station chemicals, factories spewing chromium along with mercury, hog and chicken waste. Since 1999, nature has intervened as eco-systems were surprisingly flushed free. In closing, the candle still plays a symbolic and significant role in our lives. Whether it is the positioning of candles on the birthday cake or candles on the dinner table, they provide an ongoing source of light.  Candles also enhance marriage and religious ceremonies. During our episodes of power outages the candle assists the flashlight in providing some light in the dark of the night and scented candles are very popular. At area churches, assistants provide a valuable service of replacing used candles.  It seems that when storms threaten the Louisiana coast, sometimes bound for Baton Rouge, Lafayette or New Orleans, parishioners will “borrow” candles from the church. The “borrowing” of the votive candles is apparently a time-honored tradition all along the Gulf Coast against threatening storms.


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Pat Shingleton: "September Storms" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-september-storms--112547/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-september-storms--112547/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 12 Sep 2018 9:52:44 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Statistics note that 37% of all named storms, 47% of all named hurricanes and 55% of all major hurricanes occur in September. Before the “naming” of hurricanes, Louisiana storms making landfall in September include: The September 22, 1909 Storm, The September 22, 1926 Storm, The September 21, 1947 Storm and The September 6, 1948 Storm. All landed within close proximity of Baton Rouge and New Orleans. Others include Flossy on September 25, 1956, Fern on September 13, 1971, Carmen on September 9, 1974, Babe on September 9, 1977, Elena on September 2, 1985 and Florence on September 9, 1988.  Most notably to our readers is Betsy, hitting New Orleans on this date in 1965 and Rita in 2005. The worst September storm for Baton Rouge?  Gustav. In closing here is a column written on September 12, 2008. The name Gustav will never be placed on another tropical storm or hurricane.  Similar to Katrina, Andrew and Betsy, it will be retired. On September 12, 2002, another Gustav scraped the Carolina coast and as we remember previous storms, Carolinians remember the year 1999.  Hurricanes Dennis, Floyd and Irene pummeled the Carolina coast and the nation's largest lagoonal estuary at Pamlico Sound was altered. Pamlico Sound has only four small inlets that restrict water exchange to the sea and for six weeks, its entire water content was replaced by flooding. Three-fourths of the sound's volume was displaced, salinity declined by two-thirds, nitrogen intake increased more than 50 percent and marine organisms died and became ill because of the storms."


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Pat Shingleton: "Love Bugs, Whooly Worms and Galveston" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-love-bugs-whooly-worms-and-galveston-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-love-bugs-whooly-worms-and-galveston-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 7 Sep 2018 10:59:58 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The seasonal "Love Bugs" are returning offering another hint at the end of summer and the early beginnings of autumn. We when were kids, we'd collect what we called "locust" shells from a variety of tree trunks. These insects weren't locusts but Cicadas and the sound they make comes only from the male. Tymbals, attached to the stomach muscles of the Cicada vibrate to create the sound. This begins the process of exiting its shell. Once we would hear the sound we'd look to areas of the tree to watch it fly out and away. Kids do goofy things and many of us would collect and attach the shells to a shirt or sweatshirt to aggravate the neighborhood girls as "Eeks" were common. In the upcoming weeks the Whooly worm's stripe could be a Winter predictor. In closing,
"Sunday, September 9, 1900 revealed one of the most horrible sights that ever a civilized people looked upon."  It was the end of five days of devastation. Never before or since have more Americans died in any single natural disaster.  Nearly 7,000 lives were lost because of a hurricane that leveled Galveston. When bodies were weighted and taken deep into the Gulf of Mexico for burial, they washed back onto the Galveston Beach.  The greatest death toll from any single hurricane occurred along the coast of Bangladesh on Nov. 12 1970. A gigantic cyclone bombarded the Bay of Bengal spreading a wall of water 20 feet high over the islands and settlements in the Ganges Delta where estimates of 300,000 people drowned.


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Pat Shingleton: "Camp Sumter and a Thunderstorm." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-camp-sumter-and-a-thunderstorm-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-camp-sumter-and-a-thunderstorm-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 5 Sep 2018 9:48:57 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:


Camp Sumter was opened by the Confederacy in Andersonville, Georgia, in March 1864. A 17-foot high stockade was built on 16.5 acres, sandwiched between two hillsides. The "Stockade Branch" stream wound through the hillsides and provided water for the inmates. Prisoners would scoop water from the stream with tin cups attached to poles. They were ordered to dip the water while remaining behind a "deadline." Crossing the line meant death. The stockade's pilings cramped the water flow, turning 5 acres of the space into inhabitable marsh forcing the prisoners to trudge through waist-high mud to access the water. The water became contaminated from human waste, laundered clothes and grease from the cook house. Sixty percent of the prisoners died at Camp Sumter in the summer of 1864. With additional inmates, the prison reached its peak population of 32,000 or one person per 25 square feet and 13,000 prisoners died at Camp Sumter during the Civil War. Almanacs reflect that on August 9, 1864 the afternoon temperature approached 93 degrees as a severe thunderstorm hit the camp. The torrential rain rolled across the hillside, Stockade Branch overflowed, broke the stockade's pilings and created a flash flood. Sentries contained the prisoners by firing cannons as guards, stood in the storm, preventing escapes while scrambling to repair the stockade. The next morning the filth was washed away and prisoners noticed that a single lightning bolt struck a pine stump inside the prison camp. That bolt of lightning also penetrated an underground spring that spewed fresh water to prisoners inside the stockade. A few weeks later, the prisoners were relocated as Union General William Sherman burned Atlanta, located 125 miles from the camp.


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Pat Shingleton: "Good Morning... Glories..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-good-morning-glories-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-good-morning-glories-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 30 Aug 2018 10:05:25 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The best place in the world to witness the Morning Glory is in the small village of Burketown in Australia's northern Queensland. In September and October thousands visit it to see a huge white cloud that rolls like meringue and stretches 600 miles at speeds of 35 m.p.h. Burketown lies between the northern wetlands and the southern grasslands of Queensland's Gulf region and the Morning Glory forms through a unique combination of sea breeze, moisture and high pressure. The locals call them upside-down clouds as it stirs the dust followed by dead calm. They also know it's on the way when the beer fridge's glass doors frost up and the corners of the cheap tables bend upwards.


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Pat Shingleton: "Gustav and The Quake..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gustav-and-the-quake-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-gustav-and-the-quake-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 29 Aug 2018 11:17:34 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Here's a column submitted the day before the worst hurricane in the history of Baton Rouge landed... Gustav was a timber remover for our city. Here is what I wrote..."A battle is underway between a high pressure ridge sliding into Tennessee and Hurricane Gustav, moving into the Gulf. What comes into play, in this scenario, is the exact point of landfall from this storm and the intensity of the storm when it hits.  Hurricane Gustav, on its current course and speed, should enter the Gulf after Midnight tonight. By Noon on Sunday the model runs will come into agreement, verifying landfall and strength. The battle will set-up between the high and whether it drifts south and if Gustav outruns the high.  Should the two interact, the storm slows parks offshore and creates a possible rain event that could mirror a combination of Andrew and Tropical Storm Allison."  Finally, in 1886 Charleston, South Carolina had a population of 53,000. The Ashley and Cooper Rivers create a peninsula where Charleston sits. The Old Farmer’s Almanac-Acts of God reports that at 9:51 PM on August 31, 1866, a shudder passed through the city followed by an unusual rolling sound that increased to a deafening roar.  Every person, building and the earth was in jarring motion for 40 seconds. Residents of nearby Summerville reported booms that sounded like artillery fire. Panic enveloped Charleston and The Great Charleston Earthquake recorded 17 major shocks, destroying more than 100 buildings with total damage estimated at $6 million. The same quake was felt from Canada to Cuba and from Iowa to Bermuda.


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Pat Shingleton: "An Unfortunate Prediction." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-unfortunate-prediction-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-unfortunate-prediction-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 28 Aug 2018 9:58:00 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

New Orleans' former Mayor, Ray Nagin ordered the evacuation of New Orleans,  13 years ago, on August 28th.  This is an excerpt of a Weather News column,  following the landfall of Katrina.  “After 48 hours of coverage of this devastating, catastrophic and unfortunate storm, some comments.  In every hurricane conference attended, the New Orleans scenario has been displayed. The worst-case scenario Monday morning played-out expectations of the Hurricane Center in Miami.  Numerous storms have skirted and hit New Orleans including: the October 10, 1837 Hurricane, the September 22, 1909 Hurricane, the October 2, 1915 Hurricane and the September 6, 1948 Hurricane. Named storms include Hilda in October of 1964, Betsy on September 12, 1965, Fern in September of 1971, Bob on July 12, 1979, Elena on September 2, 1965, Juan on October 29, 1985 and Florence on September 9,1988." During those conferences the experts identified two scenarios:  The "cereal bowl" effect whereby the Mississippi River, Lake Pont chartrain and the Gulf of Mexico would contribute to the flooding of a below-sea level city - New Orleans. The second scenario found Baton Rougeans opening their homes to those left homeless.  Those same experts predicted that 400,000 would pass through our town to stay or to other destinations. At WBRZ-TV, Channel 2 we opened our doors to those from the ABC affiliate, WGNO. They too, stayed in our station and at he homes of our employees while continuing our round-the-clock coverage.


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Pat Shingleton: "Storms and Birds..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-storms-and-birds-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-storms-and-birds-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 27 Aug 2018 10:03:22 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

When my daughter, Katie, was a baby girl, we would visit University Lakes for a "duck feeding." We'd go through a loaf or two of stale bread during our visits. Our trips down River Road also brought mixed reviews from those in the car when I would "Mooooo" at the cows, grazing on the levee.  Katie asked, "Where do the birds go when they die?" It was an interesting question whereby I asked friends that were avid hunters if they had every experienced areas of bird cemeteries... Years ago, The International Business Times prepared an explanation detailing a flock of songbirds that flew 1,500 miles to their nesting grounds in the Appalachians.  The tagged birds then added another 932 miles to their journey due to an approaching storm. The golden-winged warblers apparently detected tornado producing storms and diverted their flight. Researchers verified that it's the first documented event that birds departed their nesting grounds due to an approaching storm. Swooping birds often experience rumbling, created by tornadoes. Noise from tornadoes can travel thousands of miles and is in the "infra-sound" range that is outside the range of human hearing. For that episode, the birds made the right move as storms spawned 84 destructive tornadoes in the Appalachians. Once the storm passed the warblers returned to their nesting site.


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Pat Shingleton: "Record Cold and Record Andrew..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-record-cold-and-record-andrew-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-record-cold-and-record-andrew-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 22 Aug 2018 9:53:08 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Even though the dew point slid from "uncomfortable" to "sticky" the cold front that bridged through the area last night didn't knock down the temperature but dropped the humidity a "bit."  Here's  one you may remember - August 23, 2009 when Baton Rouge slipped to 63 degrees, tying a record set in 1997.  The following morning we dipped to 63, shattering a record dating back to 1957.  In 2004 we enjoyed an August spoiler with a stretch of six consecutive days of record cold.  It started on Friday, August 13 when our 61 degree overnight low broke the 65, set in 1931. The next day we set another one with 59, breaking the record in 1931 at 65 degrees.  The coldest days of the stretch occurred on Sunday, August 15 with a low of 58, whacking the previous 65 in 1967. August 16,17, 18 broke records going back seventeen years. Here's another anniversary that wasn't as popular as the previous. Prior to Harvey and Katrina, Hurricane Andrew in 1992 was the costliest hurricane in United States history. It was 26 years ago this weekend remembered as a busy time in the weather center.We were "working the storm" as Andrew roared across Florida leaving massive destruction and was now back into the Gulf of Mexico, gaining momentum.  After landfall and when the tornado warnings came down, I left the station to grab a few hour's sleep and check on the family. Similar to Gustav, the "Old Goodwood" section of Baton Rouge looked like loggers had paid a visit. Oak trees were strewn like pick-up sticks, intermingled with transformers and power poles. We experienced the effects of a single hurricane, the first of the season - in August. The storm was noted as the eighth costliest with $27.3 Billion in damage and claiming 65 lives.


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Pat Shingleton: "Wiffle Ball..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wiffle-ball-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-wiffle-ball-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 21 Aug 2018 9:58:50 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

During my younger years, the backyard was the playground as our house was situated on almost an acre of land. Adjacent yards were just as spacious, providing additional length to a football field or baseball diamond. There were no fences, only an occasional grape arbor on the edge of the property along with pear, peach, apple, walnut and butternut trees. Back then, it was a real treat to play fast-pitch "wiffle ball" underneath the outdoor spotlights in Tom Minett's backyard. The clear, western Pennsylvania summer evenings also provided another advantage - star shows. Using the lawn chair, chase lounge, a blanket or even on top of the picnic table, we would view the stars and constellations, far away from the illuminating lights of Pittsburgh. The conversation on those August evenings would revolve around the Pittsburgh Pirates, the make and model of car heading down Brighton Road and the unfortunate start of school.


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Pat Shingleton: http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--111739/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton--111739/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 20 Aug 2018 10:29:58 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Once our late afternoon thunderstorms end, our “weather-watchers” forward spectacular pictures of sunsets that we share with our viewers. Research indicates that there are physical benefits to sunsets. Scientists have discovered that during complete darkness, a body produces the hormone melatonin.  Melatonin fights diseases, including breast and prostate cancer.  Small amounts of light around your bed at night switch off the production of melatonin and a dark night may keep certain cancers under control. Light during the evening hours, emanating from your bedroom television, activates other “daytime” immune system hormones. If these are compromised, illnesses are more likely.  Scientists contend nature also needs darkness, as animals' immune systems grow weak if there's artificial light at night. Stay in the dark, when you can.


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Pat Shingleton: "The 3 Stooges and The Charter Oak..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-3-stooges-and-the-charter-oak-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-3-stooges-and-the-charter-oak-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 17 Aug 2018 9:48:18 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Years ago my brothers and I would settle in to enjoy episodes of the “Three Stooges” on rainy summer afternoons.  However the respite was short-lived when the soggy weather pattern advanced to the next day.  The early morning began with the traditional hearty breakfast and with baseball games cancelled Mom directed us to seasonal chores of cleaning the basement, attic and garage.  A large compliment of tools and lawn equipment were moved as the garage floor was swept. The basement was swept down, hosed down and straightened. Those were the chores then and except for the basement, it may be a chore for some this weekend. In closing, Dutch explorer, Adrian Block, described in his journal an unusually large white oak tree growing in a clearing on what is now Hartford, Connecticut. In the 1630s, a delegation of Native Americans approached the property’s owner where the tree was located.  Intending to remove the tree, Samuel Wyllys preserved it because it was planted ceremonially for the sake of peace when their tribe first settled the area. Local legend states that in 1687 the cavity of the tree was cored to hide the Constitution Charter from King James II.  At that moment it was renamed the “Charter Oak.” August 19th marked the 162nd year anniversary of the tree and on August 21, 1856 it was severely damaged by a fierce wind storm.


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Pat Shingleton: "Cardboard Boxes and Up, Up, and Away...." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-cardboard-boxes-and-up-up-and-away-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-cardboard-boxes-and-up-up-and-away-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 15 Aug 2018 10:47:28 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

In May of 2012, Gary Connery donned a wing suit and performed a 3,000 foot base jump onto 24,000 cardboard boxes in Henley upon Thames for a world record. On July 25th, 2012, Felix Baumgartner freefell for four minutes at 536 mph, opening his chute for the worlds highest skydive. On this date in 1960, Air Force Captain Joseph Kittenger donned four layers of clothing and left New Mexico in a gondola attached to a helium balloon.  Kittenger went skyward for 19 miles and a never before attempted jump back to earth.  As temperatures dipped to 100 degrees below zero he soared to 102,800 feet and parachuted. He fell for four minutes and 37 seconds and at 14,000 feet his parachute opened, landing safely on the desert floor.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Bolt and Earthshine..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-bolt-and-earthshine-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-bolt-and-earthshine-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 14 Aug 2018 9:53:59 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

I recently visited with Fred Gwyn and the lightning that accompanied a thunderstorm last Sunday evening. The average lightning bolt is five times hotter than the surface of the sun, lasting less than 200 milliseconds. Cloud to ground lightning forms when a bolt of energy ejects from the storm cloud, meeting another bolt rising from the ground.  The flash occurs when those two bolts collide and return to the cloud. Tim Samaras has been studying lightning for many years and is obsessed with capturing the earliest images of a lightning strike and does so with an incredibly large camera.  Samaras believes that lightning and tornadoes are the final links of meteorological understanding and his 1600-pound-high-resolution, high-speed camera captures lightning photos that provide answers and save lives. Known as Kahuna, it’s the highest resolution and speed-camera in the world, resting inside Samaras’ mobile laboratory. From one flash to another... "Earthshine" is visible to the eye during a crescent moon.  Leonardo da Vinci first explained the phenomenon whereby the moon acts like a giant mirror, showing the sunlight reflected from Earth.  The brightness of the "Earthshine" measures the reflectance of the Earth.  Scientists verify the Earth's climate is driven by the net sunlight it absorbs.  They report that up to 20 percent of the reflectance has seasonal variations and have also verified a 2.5 percent decrease has occurred during the last ten years.  If the Earth reflected 1 percent less light, the effect would be significant enough to be a concern for global warming.  In the early 1900s. French astronomer Andre'-Louis Danjon began the first quantitative observations of "Earthshine."  This method was dormant until 1991. The intensity of the "Earthshine" is measured at the Big Bear Solar Observatory in California.


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Pat Shingleton: "Hiroshima and Pythons..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hiroshima-and-pythons-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-hiroshima-and-pythons-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 8 Aug 2018 10:29:09 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Following the bombing of Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, which resulted in 140,000 deaths, the Makurazaki Typhoon hit the city one month later killing 1,200.  The second bombing of Japan was scheduled on August 11 but  was moved up two days due to expected bad weather and the originally  selected city of Kokura was later changed to Nagasaki.  On this date in 1945, a B-29 bomber, nicknamed Bockscar, after its commander, Frederick Bock, took-off from the island of Tinian carrying a 9,000 pound plutonium bomb named Fat Man with a blast equivalent of 21 kilotons of TNT.  Two weather observation planes scouted conditions over both target areas.  At 11:02 a.m. on August 9, 1945 the nuclear inferno was unleashed 500 meters above the surface. For many years the Florida Everglades has been invaded by nonnative species such as Burmese and African pythons, iguanas, and invasive fish.  The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission notes that the invasion occurs due to pet owners discarding the animals into the wild.  Pet shops and stores that experience devastation from storms and hurricanes also lose animals into the wild were they quickly multiply.  Burmese pythons consume just about anything and are harmful to the environment because of their voracious appetites which includes eating other endangered species.  Wildlife officials have been diligent about removing the pythons.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Siesta and THE Birthday!" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-siesta-and-the-birthday-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-siesta-and-the-birthday-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 7 Aug 2018 10:31:29 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Hot weather makes us tired and sluggish and what is common in Mexico and Spain to combat these symptoms should be considered here.  The siesta originates from the Latin, hora sexta or “the sixth hour.”  It’s a short nap, taken in the early afternoon typically after the midday meal. Weather and a heavy intake of food seem to be the determining factor and the reason for the siesta.  To fully enjoy it, pajamas, a bed or a sofa are recommended and the siesta should last between 15 and 30 minutes without any distractions. I subscribe to this activity with what I refer to as a "power-nap." With just 25 minutes of rest, I awake and feel as though I've slept hours. The best way to wake-up from the siesta is to hear a delicate human voice followed by a glass of water and a piece of chocolate. Inclosing, on August 8, 1993, record-setting floods in Des Moines, Iowa finally ended marking the first time since July 11 that the city's tap water was safe to drink. On the same date in 1999, an F-2 tornado cut a 300 yard path in Mattituck, Long Island. A stone fireplace's chimney saved one resident from an approaching wall of water. On August 8, 2004, lightning struck two teenage boys corralling cattle in Wauneta, NE, knocked unconscious, they survived. August 9, 2001 found the artificial turf at a Philadelphia Phillies baseball game reaching 149 degrees as 24 fans were treated for heat exhaustion.  Finally, on this date in 1985, baby-boy Michael Shingleton arrived at 1:00 am and Tropical Storm Beryl was 50 miles west of New Orleans, with 40 M.P.H. winds.


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Pat Shingleton: "Coastal Lights and Coastal Smells..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-coastal-lights-and-coastal-smells-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-coastal-lights-and-coastal-smells-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 6 Aug 2018 11:00:07 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The First Congress federalized existing lighthouses, built by the colonies, on August 7, 1789.  On that date, they also appropriated funds for lighthouses, beacons and buoys. The lighthouse directed ships safely through episodes of fog, storms and other weather events.  Sound was also used to guide ships and in colonial times cannons fired from shore warned ships away from fog shrouded coastlines.  A fog bell was first used in 1852 with a mechanical bell in 1869, a fog trumpet in 1872 and an air siren in 1887.  Those that serviced these devices were members of the Lighthouse Service, often performing their duties in extreme hardship.  On August 7, 1939, the administration of the lighthouses was transferred to the Coast Guard. With the "coast" previously referenced, on your trips to the coast you know your close when you smell the salt air. Science Magazine reported that the fishy, tangy smell is actually a bacteria gas.  Andrew Johnson of the University of East Anglia posted a study suggesting that sea smell emanates from a pungent gas called dimethyl sulfide, originating in the emission of sulfur from the ocean.  DMS is produced when bacteria feast on dying sea plants and plankton. He also believes that humans aren’t the only ones acclimated to the smell.  Some seabirds use the odor to locate coastal food sources. During the experiment a scientific team opened a bottle containing DMS-producing bacteria, after the opening, the team was bombarded by hungry seabirds.


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