WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ WBRZ Pat Shingleton Column Pat Shingleton Column en-us Copyright 2018, WBRZ. All Rights Reserved. Feed content is not avaialble for commercial use. () () Wed, 20 Jun 2018 HH:06:ss GMT Synapse CMS 10 WBRZ http://www.wbrz.com/ 144 25 Pat Shingleton: "An Odd Moon and An Odd Umbrella..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-odd-moon-and-an-odd-umbrella-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-an-odd-moon-and-an-odd-umbrella-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 18 Jun 2018 10:59:07 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On June 18, 1178, five monks in Canterbury, England, witnessed an astronomical event on the Sunday before the feast of St. John the Baptist. Historian Juanita Rose Violini, reported that their diaries note “an east-facing crescent moon” split in two. In addition to the “split,” a blaze of hot coals and fire surrounded the moon. They also noted that the moon began to “throb like a wounded snake,” and the scenario repeated a dozen times. This event was documented by the famous medieval chronicler, Gervase of Canterbury. Space scientist Dr. Jack Hartung of the State University of New York, reviewed the testimony 800 years later. He calculated the impact point and size of the moon crater, believing it was caused by a nine mile wide meteor. In closing, our umbrellas are getting a workout this month. Umbrella comes from the Latin word umbra meaning shade and was used in Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, and Ancient Rome. The oldest reference to the umbrella in China dates to the year 21 CE and the King of Siam in 1687 gifted them to his subjects. Years ago, Ambient Devices marketed an umbrella that alerts the user when rain is expected. It’s called the Forecasting Umbrella and if it rains in the next 12 hours, the umbrella’s handle will flash. Data from AccuWeather.com activates the umbrella’s sensors and can differentiate between storms, with fast flashes to slow flashes for sprinkles. Similar to current umbrellas, you’ll still need to manually raise this battery operated umbrella.


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Pat Shingleton: "Chris's Sightings..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-chris-s-sightings-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-chris-s-sightings-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 14 Jun 2018 11:11:30 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On this date in 1608, navigator Henry Hudson sighted a mermaid while sailing through the arctic waters of Russia. “The Almanac of the Infamous, Incredible and Ignored” notes that Christopher Columbus reportedly spotted three mermaids in the Caribbean in 1493 and later logged additional sightings off the coast of Guinea.  In 1614, explorer John Smith spied a young woman in the West Indies. Other sightings date back to 1610 in Newfoundland waters where Captain Whitbourne described a sea creature with the face of a woman. In 1917, the Leonidas, sailing from America to France, was accompanied by a mermaid for six hours. Finally, a “merman” wiggled from a fisherman’s net in India in 1937.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Yunan - Ah Choo" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-yunan-ah-choo-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-yunan-ah-choo-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 13 Jun 2018 11:11:47 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

A species of monkey, discovered a few years ago in Northern Myanmar - formerly Burma, would have difficulties adapting to Baton Rouge. The Yunnan snub-nosed monkey remains new to scientific discoveries but residents of Myanmar report they are easy to find, especially when it’s raining.  Wiley-Blackwell reported that because of their wide upturned noses, rainwater gets into their nostrils and causes them to sneeze.  During episodes of extended rainy days the monkeys will place their heads between their knees so that rainwater will roll off their head and not in their nose.  During the summer months and extended periods of wet weather, the snub-nosed creatures migrate to higher elevations where snowfall prevents the “ah-choo” moments. They then return closer to the villages because snowfall shuts off their food sources.


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Pat Shingleton: "Ben and the Turkey..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ben-and-the-turkey-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-ben-and-the-turkey-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 12 Jun 2018 11:02:00 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:


Louisiana ranks second to the number of lightning hits on a yearly basis with Florida leading the list. The Old Farmer’s Almanac-Acts of God notes an excerpt from one of Benjamin Franklin’s journals which may have placed the famed statesman and inventor as one of the first to execute resuscitation. “A pullet (turkey) was struck dead by the lightning shock directed through its head.”  Franklin furthered in his journal that he attempted to revive the turkey by repeatedly “blowing into its lungs.”  His attempts with this procedure met with success and apparently the bird recovered.  However, once it was “set down”, the confused and delirious turkey ran headlong against a wall. Historians believe this was one of the first cases of artificial respiration being used as a treatment of electric shock.


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Pat Shingleton: "Microbaroms and Hemingway's Hurricane..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-microbaroms-and-hemingway-s-hurricane-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-microbaroms-and-hemingway-s-hurricane-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 11 Jun 2018 10:47:16 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Microbaroms are infrasound signals created by certain kinds of ocean waves that are captured thousands of miles away. The Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans reported that these signals, delivered during tropical cyclones, can be distinguished from other wave activity.  Microbaroms are an asset in monitoring and predicting wave hazards during hurricanes.  In 2009, researchers monitored two Pacific tropical cyclones, Niki and Felicia that moved over an infrasound sensor in Hawaii.  They determined that the microbaroms from the hurricane activity overwhelmed weaker signals from similar ocean activity. It represented the first step in using infrasound measurements to determine storm strength. Recently,  additional experimentation examined world-wide storms for comparative large-scale weather patterns. In closing, Hurricanes Katrina, Andrew, Gustav, Rita, Camille and Betsy often become the comparative storms. Another storm was chronicled in an interesting book entitled, “Hemingway’s’ Hurricane: The Great Florida Keys Storm of 1935” by Phil Scott.  It’s called Hemingway’s Hurricane because the famous author lived 80 miles southwest of Key West where he rode out the storm and journaled his experiences from August 30 to September 4, 1935.  Scott’s angle on the book includes the lives of 700 World War I veterans who relocated to Florida in 1935 under the Federal Emergency Relief Organization to assist in public works projects. The storm hit three veteran’s camps causing more than 400 deaths when early evacuations could have saved their lives. 


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Pat Shingleton: "Thermals and Surfing..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-thermals-and-surfing-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-thermals-and-surfing-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 5 Jun 2018 5:27:08 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

"Thermals" are sections of air, heated by the sun, that ride from the ground to heights of 40,000 feet. Once a glider pilot locks into a thermal they call it "soaring."  They may also interact with a "wave" which is common in the western states.  This rare phenomenon occurs when a layer of compressed air slides over the Sierras, and bumps across the Mojave desert. This is about the only place in the United States where these waves occur and provides glider pilots with a real treat.  In 1986 the world record for glider altitude was captured near California City at a height of 49,000 feet.  The Federal Aviation Administration has placed a cap on glider heights at 18,000 feet, unless there is special permission from the FAA. Even though the principles are the same, folks were flying gliders before the Wright Brothers and in the United States there are 39,000 hooks sail planers with glider ratings. Finally, five days into Hurricane Season 2018 and a "rewind" to the effects of Tropical Storm Allison that caused $5 billion in damage and became a real treat for surfers on the Texas coast.  Allison's landfall created extraordinary large and well-shaped waves along the upper and middle Texas coast.  Winds offshore spun along the coast and met a strong swell radiating east across the open gulf.  A continual north-northwest wind flattened the storm's tidal surge blowing straight into the approaching waves.  This wind sculpted waves that resembled waves with Pacific coast quality.  During the morning of June 5, 2001, Buoy Station 42035, located 22 miles east of Galveston recorded six-foot seas. At 2:00 P.M. the same station reported 12-foot seas. The best surf in several years occurred that afternoon inside the Freeport Ship Channel jetties, 60 miles south of Houston.  As word got out, the outbound lanes of Texas Highway 288 were packed with inbound surfers.


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Pat Shingleton: "Past Seasons" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-past-seasons-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-past-seasons-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 1 Jun 2018 10:27:59 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Last year it was Harvey and Maria. On the rewind and the 21st Century whereby numerous, memorable hurricanes were recorded.  The nation's deadliest disaster happened in 1900 when a hurricane struck Galveston, Texas.  Storm surge caused 8,000 deaths with estimates as high as 12,000.  The "Atlantic-Gulf Hurricane of 1919" hit Corpus  Christi on September 14 with a 12-foot storm surge and 900 deaths while 1,836 died September 13, 1928 from a lake surge following the Okeechobee hurricane.  The "Florida Keys-Labor Day Hurricane of 1935" moved through the Florida Keys and the Southeast killing 408. The "Long Island Express of 1938" battered southern New England and in 1944 the "Great Atlantic Hurricane" sank a Navy destroyer, minesweeper, two Coast Guard cutters and a light vessel.  Hurricane Carol caused $461 million in damage on August 31, 1954.  A few days later Hurricane Edna blasted Cape Cod killing 20. Closing now with a column filed years ago..."Last September, Hurricane Gustav caused more tree damage in Baton Rouge than any hurricane or tropical storm in our history.  We quickly experienced the power of  70 mile-per-hour winds lasting more than ten hours that toppled the water oaks and pine trees in our neighborhoods.  The Associated Press reports that a tree that was planted by Marie Antoinette was recently destroyed. It wasn’t a sharp saw, but similar to Gustav, unusually high wind gusts that toppled this historic tree.  The 223-year-old purple beech was 82 feet tall and crashed to the ground during a severe winter storm last January.  The storm also caused extensive damage not only in France but parts of Spain.  It was cut up and sold to make paper."


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Pat Shingleton: "Naturally..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-naturally-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-naturally-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 30 May 2018 10:56:40 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Thundershowers are loaded with nitrogen and provides an ingredient that keeps our vegetation green.  Carlo Carretto became a monk at age 44 and lived a life of prayer in the Arabian desert. His book, “Letters from the Desert” tells how he rediscovered God’s glory in the starry skies of Arabia.  One excerpt notes: ”How dear the stars are to me, I know them by their names, I distinguish their color, size, position and beauty. I know my way around them and from them I calculate the time without a watch.” Recently we protected a mother Cardinal and her eggs in an Boganvilla plant, hanging from our back porch.  With the nest protected by the thorns on the plant I was able to water then plant in between the "sittings" and the hatching. The research was accurate that after 11 days of incubation the peeps were in need of nourishment.  George Washington Carver wrote: “I love to think of nature as an unlimited broadcasting system through which God speaks to us every hour, if we only tune in.”


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Pat Shingleton: "Black Carbon is for the Birds..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-black-carbon-is-for-the-birds-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-black-carbon-is-for-the-birds-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 29 May 2018 5:52:16 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Black carbon is also known as "soot" and was the most prolific pollutant in the 1900's. Two University of Chicago graduate students, Shane DuBay and Carl Fuldner, advanced their research on industrial-era  air pollution by studying birds. A collection of fowl in Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History helped clarify the record on black carbon emissions. The team studied more than 1,300 birds in the museum that were collected and displayed between 1880 and 2015. The bird examples were contributed from midwestern states. DuBay and Fuldner were able to identify black carbon that accumulated on the birds and by matching date and location information on the specimens, they were able to trace soot levels to the nineteenth century.  They were also able to verify their methodology by recognizing a decline in the levels during the Great Depression and an increase during World War II.  Soot levels between 1880 and 1910 were higher than previously targeted by model comparisons. 


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Pat Shingleton: "183 Days..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-183-days-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-183-days-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 28 May 2018 6:36:15 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

For the last 41 years, I've advanced the date - June 1st - and the start of Hurricane Season. For many of these years, the beginning of the season is also marked with a "Hurricane Special."  Traditionally this hour special constitutes a variety of tropical storm and hurricane related subjects and items sandwiched into a time slot for the benefit of our viewers and in preparation for and with the next six months. "Taking it out of the box," your Weather Team, in conjunction with our News Team, will provide a week's worth of valuable information, segmented into our evening broadcasts at 6 and 10 PM. We began the week with a report from the Hurricane Hunters.  Our weather casts have included and will include the following:  Tropical Storm History, Storm Names Storm Categories, Knowing the Cone, Costliest Storms, Tornadoes, Storm Surge, Inland Flooding, Hurricane Winds, Saffir-Simpson, What We Provide, Seasonal Forecasts, Forecast Models, Wind Shear and Tropical Frequency.  We will replicate valuable information on all of our broadcast and social media platforms. One message certainly "rings true," preparation and planning.  We continue to prepare for a season that historically reminds us that it is NOT the number of predicted storms as identified by the National Hurricane Center or the speculators from Colorado State University but a single storm that has caused consternation for us.  The worst tropical storm to impact us was Tropical Storm Allison.  The worst storm to displace the population of New Orleans was Katrina and the worst hurricane to hit Baton Rouge was Gustav. We will obviously monitor any and all tropical developments from now through November 20th.


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Pat Shingleton: "Solar Armour and... our Marching Band..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-solar-armour-and-our-marching-band-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-solar-armour-and-our-marching-band-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 25 May 2018 10:28:17 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Bogus stories lace the colorful history of Death Valley, CA. Here's a good one.  In 1874, the editor of the Virginia Territorial Enterprise needed some space to fill.  He concocted a story about a scientist who invented a suit called, "solar armor."  The scientist covered himself with a sponge-like material, saturated himself with water and set across the desert.  According to the newspaper article, they discovered the inventor perched on a rock, frozen solid.  The rapid evaporation of water had supposedly turned the sponge into ice.  The scientist's beard was covered with frost and a foot-long icicle hung from the end of his nose.  Back then, the story had the trappings of scientific fact. In closing, Dave Brooks was our band director at Riverside High School. Under his tutelage we became one of the best marching bands in western Pennsylvania.  Memorial Day began the summer band marching season. Competitions with other high school bands and drum and bugle corps continued through September.  Included in our summer schedules were baseball practices and games. Even when the baseball game was “rained-out,” that wasn’t the case with our rain or shine band competitions. The drum-line consisted of Del Wiley, Jim Zeigler, Jimmy Wilds, Tom Minett and others. With a snare drum strapped to your leg sometimes it was everything we could do to “side-step” what the horses ahead of us left on the parade route. 


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Pat Shingleton: "Tapping Water..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-tapping-water-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-tapping-water-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 24 May 2018 10:28:47 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Most television and radio personalities have been asked to "judge" everything from beauty contests, dance contests and science projects, to name a few. One of the more interesting requests for me was being asked to assist in taste testing water. I vividly remember myself, the late Fran Spain and others determining the best tasting water for the region and the country as samples were collected from numerous locations around the United States. Every judge selected our Baton Rouge "tap" water as the best in taste and smell. A few years ago, Baton Rouge water was judged the second best water in the country. Many companies along the chemical corridor have now switched from tapping our aquifers to tapping the Mississippi River for industrial water needs. There remain a few plants that haven't conformed. Under the leadership of California's Governor, Jerry Brown, drastic measures were enacted in 2015 to conserve water there. Researchers determined that an easy solution is in their backyard. According to the Sacramento Bee, over a billion gallons of treated wastewater from 250 water recycling facilities, are unloaded into the Pacific Ocean each year. The treated wastewater is currently being recycled for irrigation, toilet flushing, and groundwater replenishment. The state's goal last year was to recycle 2.5 million acre feet of water by 2030. We may suffer through the heat, steam and pesky afternoon thundershowers but the fresh water we enjoy now, from our aquifers , is 2000 years old.


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Pat Shingleton: "Auto A.C. and Slats..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-auto-a-c-and-slats-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-auto-a-c-and-slats-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 22 May 2018 10:30:24 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Open vehicle windows will cool the occupants through evaporation and closed windows reduce automobile drag and possibly less fuel consumption. In 1933, conditioned air was introduced for luxury cars and limousines and Packard’s were the first manufacturers to install them in their 1940 models. Twelve years later, air conditioning became a standard feature in the Chrysler Imperial. Since then, virtually all vehicles have air conditioning and around here it is certainly welcome. Experts suggest opening  the windows before activating the AC controls.  Research indicates that the car dashboard, seats and even air fresheners emit a cancer causing carcinogen called Benzene and a vehicle in direct sunlight at 60 degrees increases Benzene levels by 40 times over acceptable levels. These directives are also identified in your vehicle owner’s manual. Year's ago, it was our responsibility to secure transportation in all types of weather. My brother Kevin and I would sit on “the wishing wall,” at the base of Brighton Road, hoping that anyone going up-the-hill would take us with them. Slats Kotuby had a ’44 Ford pickup and if there wasn’t room in the cab, you got in the back. Leaving Riverside High School in a snowstorm, we piled into his truck. Slats wore very thick glasses, and when the wipers went out, Slats stuck his head out the window, driving the truck like Casey Jones in a driving snowstorm and a temperature of 24 degrees. Everything was frozen on Slats’ head as he was then known as Admiral Byrd.


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Pat Shingleton: "Lightning Hits and the Weather-Stick" http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lightning-hits-and-the-weather-stick-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-lightning-hits-and-the-weather-stick-/ Pat Shingleton Column Mon, 21 May 2018 10:47:18 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

On your "WBRZ Ap," you may hear... "Lightning has been detected in your area..." We’ve presented numerous columns on human lightning rods. On September 21, 1946, in Kenton, Ohio, Charles Brown was bonked by a lightning bolt for the tenth time while visiting the public library.  The Almanac of the Infamous, Incredible and Ignored reports that Roy Cleveland Sullivan, a forest ranger from Waynesboro, Virginia, was zapped seven times within a 36-year-period.  This included episodes while on duty in a fire lookout tower when he was popped in his toenail while other times included scorched eyebrows, shoulder burns and hair fire. Carl “Sparky” Mize was hit four times when the first occasion occurred while riding a bull in the rodeo circuit. He was also “bolted” when lightning ricocheted into the handle of his pick-up truck. A “weatherstick” is made from a branch that was once attached to a portion of a tree trunk. Traditionally the balsam fir tree was used with the bark stripped from the stick allowing it to bend.  If the stick bent skyward, fair, dry weather was expected and should it bend toward the ground, foul, wet weather could be expected.  The stick was usually fifteen inches long and pencil thin and surprisingly displayed some assemblance of accuracy.  As in previous articles the reason the stick bent was due to relative humidity. Coniferous and other softwood trees such as pine or spruce were composed of two different kinds of wood. Similar to the Rittenhouse Hygrometer, the top contains plain wood while the bottom is compressed wood. The stick moves because the wood on the bottom contracts lengthwise more than the top and it bends down.  The opposite occurs when relative humidity rises towards its original position.


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Pat Shingleton: "No Noise and No Light..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-no-noise-and-no-light-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-no-noise-and-no-light-/ Pat Shingleton Column Thu, 17 May 2018 10:30:45 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

The tiny town of Green Bank, nestled in the middle of the Allegheny Mountain Range, could be one of the quietest places on Earth. It’s the home of the Green Bank Telescope, operating under the auspices of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. In 1958, the Federal Communications Commission created a 13,000-square-mile quiet zone to shield Green Bank’s radio telescopes from man-made interference.  The entire National Radio Quiet Zone borders Virginia and West Virginia and permissible noises include daytime car engines, wind, and thunder.  Cellphones, other mobile devies and designated electronics are regulated by Chuck Naday who patrols and protects the largest steer-able radio telescope. About half the size of the Statue of Liberty, the radio telescope listens into space, gathering signals originating 14 billion years ago. Also of interest, we're fortunate in south Louisiana to have the atmospheric characteristics to enjoy marvelous sunrises and sunsets.  Research indicates that after sunset there are physical benefits. Scientists have discovered that only when it's really dark can your body produce the hormone, melatonin.  Melatonin fights diseases, including breast and prostate cancer.  Small amounts of light around your bed at night switch off the production of melatonin. A dark night may keep certain cancers under control. Light during the evening hours, even emanating from your bedroom television, turns on other immune system hormones that should be activated only in daytime.  If these hormones are depleted, you could be more likely to catch a cold.  Scientists believe nature also needs darkness, as animals' immune systems grow weak if there's artificial light at night.  So turn off everything, enjoy your rest and wake up with dawn's early light. 


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Pat Shingleton: "Rittenhouse and... the Divining Rod..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rittenhouse-and-the-divining-rod-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-rittenhouse-and-the-divining-rod-/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 16 May 2018 5:49:54 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

As wood swells and shrinks it gains or loses water once it is at or below a 30% saturation point.  In the "deep south," elevated measures of humidity cause the shrinking and changing shapes of indoor wood.  Examples include gaps between floorboards, creaking stairs, trim joints opening up, piano sound boards changing tunes and doors and drawers that once stuck, opening easily.  Of course the process reverses when higher levels of relative humidity restores moisture content to its original levels. David Rittenhouse made mathematical instruments for surveying and astronomy and in the 1700s invented the Rittenhouse Hygrometer. This weather instrument registers the relative humidity of the air by using wood as its sensor. Wood swells and shrinks about 80 times as much around the growth rings and 40 times as much across the rings.  Rittenhouse took two identically sized strips of mahogany, glued them together to complete a single slat and attached one end to a base while placing a tipped pointer on the other end.  When the humidity rose, the strip swelled, forcing the slat to bend and when it dropped the strip shrank and bent.  Rittenhouse’s invention is used today by designers of plywood, laminated floors and layered wood to ensure that these products remain flat as they adjust to the power of relative humidity. The weather stick was invented in the late 1700s and is still used to forecast the weather. Referencing "sticks," attempts to locate water were called dowsing and a dowsing rod, divining rod or witching rod was used.  The rod was a Y shaped twig that supposedly jumped when above ground contact with a water source occurred. My grandfather embraced this process and would whittle the rod to educate us as to its benefits. Not that interested, we would use the rods as “apple launchers.”  Jamming an apple on the rod and whipping it like a fishing rod would propel the apple.  My brother Kevin holds the record for hitting two heads with one apple from a “launcher.”  Kevin first hit Pumpkin Head Hulick and the apple ricocheted into Bob “Head” Krestel.


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Pat Shingleton: "The Belt and The Dam..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-belt-and-the-dam-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-the-belt-and-the-dam-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 15 May 2018 10:29:41 PM Pat Shingleton Pat Shingleton:

The area that safeguards orbiting satellites in Middle Earth Orbits is referred to as the Van Allen Belt.  This is a reduced radiation zone around the earth and the cause of this zone has been discussed by scientists for many years. For four decades it was believed that the zone was safe due to radio waves from space that cleared the area of harmful radiation. A few year ago, NASA scientists identified the cause as lightning.  Researchers believe that the cleansing radio waves are caused by lightning to create the protective zone.  The radio waves interact with particles within the radiation belt, zap some of the energy, change the energy direction and prevent the radiation particles to bounce back into space.  Without the cleansing aspect of the lightning, a large, damaging radiation belt would occur, preventing satellites to orbit in the Van Allen Belt. In the future, scientists may be able to remove other damaging belts from around the earth. Another item recognizes this date in 1874 and a dam break in Williamsburg, MA that killed 13. Floods have resulted in the failure of dams and the stress on these structures caused by heavy or prolonged downpours. On February, 26, 1972, two coal slag dams along Buffalo Creek in southern West Virginia broke, unloading two miles of backed-up water into a lower dam that exploded.  In the hollow below, 4,000 homes were washed away and 125 people died. On June 5, 1976, the 305-foot Teton Dam in Idaho collapsed releasing 80 billion gallons of water into adjoining farmland.


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Pat Shingleton: "Today and Mom..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-today-and-mom-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-today-and-mom-/ Pat Shingleton Column Fri, 11 May 2018 9:45:18 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Recent readings of 90 degree daytime highs are not unusual for the first week's in May. So far we've logged four days in the 90s - May 2nd, 7th, 8th and 9th. All were within a few degrees of record highs. Other May stats note that on May 13, 1989, 95 m.p.h. thunderstorm winds at Fort Hood, Texas damaging 200 helicopters. May 13, 1883 found two tornadoes in Kansas City, MO that destroyed homes on 13th and Cherry Street which today it’s the location of their Federal Building and formerly the location of the National Severe Storms Forecast Center. On May 15, 1834, a snowstorm placed a half foot of snow on Erie, PA with “sleighs on the roads” in Rutland, VT. And in recognition of a special day and realixzing the left us in November of 2016. She lived in the house where she was born and refused to relocate to where her children reside. Her oldest, Denis, was born in the Spring, Mike in the Summer, Patrick and Kevin in Winter, Maureen and Mark in the Fall. Whether a snowstorm or thunderstorm, she referred to them by saying, “It’s getting bad out there…” Summertime chores were a discipline followed by sports-related activities or swimming. Leaves were raked and piled on the garden. The snowy winters found us clad in snow-pants, boots, hoods, gloves, and home-made stocking hats as we could hardly move.  I escorted Sue Welsh to our school prom as she requested violets for her corsage.  Mom and her friend, Loraine Blinn, picked hundreds of them and took them to the florist where Sue’s corsage was constructed. Realizing you too will share a moment with your Mom whether it be your prayers at a quiet time, a card, a flower, a hug or a kiss.  Thanks to all the moms, where would we be without you...


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Pat Shingleton: 'Heat Bursts..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-heat-bursts--108203/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-heat-bursts--108203/ Pat Shingleton Column Wed, 9 May 2018 10:48:07 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton: 'Heat Bursts...


Higher humidity and temperatures heading to the upper 80s occasionally activate afternoon thundershowers. We may experience some "convective showers" Saturday. We're not expecting any "heat bursts" this month however when they occur, 100 m.p.h. hot air blasts are possible. In Portugal on July 6, 1949 meteorological observers reported a temperature increase from 100 to 158 degrees F in two minutes.  In the early evening of June 15, 1960 at Lake Whitney, Texas, the temperature rose to 140 degrees F in a few minutes with winds of 80 to 100 miles per hour. A nearby cotton field was completely scorched and car radiators boiled over.  A heat burst traditionally forms after sunset as warm, moist air that feeds a thunderstorm cuts off and the storm collapses.  The rain in the top of the thunderhead drops into cool, dry air, becomes compressed and hits the ground as a hot dry wind. What makes the heat burst so unusual is the high rate of speed at which the down draft travels.


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Pat Shingleton: "Balloons, Kites and... the Bomb..." http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-balloons-kites-and-the-bomb-/ http://www.wbrz.com/news/pat-shingleton-balloons-kites-and-the-bomb-/ Pat Shingleton Column Tue, 8 May 2018 11:08:02 PM Pat Shingleton: Pat Shingleton:

Pilot or pibal balloons were one of the first methods of determining the condition of winds-aloft. These balloon observations were useful to early aviators and were extensively used during World War I. Today it's the National Weather Service but back then it was called the Meteorological Service of the U.S. Signal Corps. In 1923 nearly 5000 pilot balloon observations were taken and were kept in sight at a distance of 60 miles and sometimes to heights of 20 miles. Before balloons, the first reliable observations of upper air winds came from instrumented kites. Benjamin Franklin initiated the use of kites for weather experiments and by the 1890s observations of the atmosphere were common place due to the development of steel piano wire. The wire supported the weight of the kite and the attached instrument packages. However, without the wind, the kite didn't soar and the balloon replaced it. Also...following the bombing of Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, which resulted in 140,000 deaths, the Makurazaki Typhoon hit the city one month later killing 1,200. The second bombing of Japan was scheduled on August 11 but was moved up two days due to expected bad weather and the originally selected city of Kokura was later changed to Nagasaki.  On August 9, 1945, a B-29 bomber, nicknamed Bockscar, after its commander, Frederick Bock, took-off from the island of Tinian carrying a 9,000 pound plutonium bomb named Fat Man with a blast equivalent of 21 kilotons of TNT.  Two weather observation planes scouted conditions over both target areas.  At 11:02 a.m. on August 9, 1945 the nuclear inferno was unleashed 500 meters above the surface.


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